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NRSKarenRN, BSN, RN Moderator 151,704 Views

Joined: Oct 10, '00; Posts: 27,437 (22% Liked) ; Likes: 13,651
Utilization Review, prior Intake Mgr Home Care; from PA , US
Specialty: 40 year(s) of experience in Home Care, Vents, Telemetry, Home infusion

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  • May 14

    Delaware County CC hands down ---well regarded in the nursing community and college credits easily transfer if you desire further degrees.

  • May 12

    Nurse Week tribute from a mother who's son died due to rare form of Leukemia April 19th, 2018 to RN's at CHOP: Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia....thanks for taking the time to write in your sorrow.

    Found Philadelphia Inquirer
    May 10th, 2018

    Mom writes touching tribute to CHOP nurses who cared for son with cancer - Philly

    I want to talk a bit about the night Colin passed away. It is by no means easy, it hurts a lot. But this week is National Nurse's Week and I don't think people think enough about what this group of men and woman do for us, for our children on our worst days....

    ...Please say a silent word of thanks that these nurses have what it takes to do what they do, just in case you need them for your child. And if you do, they will be there for you, by your side every, single second. That, I can guarantee.

  • May 11

    Nurse Week tribute from a mother who's son died due to rare form of Leukemia April 19th, 2018 to RN's at CHOP: Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia....thanks for taking the time to write in your sorrow.

    Found Philadelphia Inquirer
    May 10th, 2018

    Mom writes touching tribute to CHOP nurses who cared for son with cancer - Philly

    I want to talk a bit about the night Colin passed away. It is by no means easy, it hurts a lot. But this week is National Nurse's Week and I don't think people think enough about what this group of men and woman do for us, for our children on our worst days....

    ...Please say a silent word of thanks that these nurses have what it takes to do what they do, just in case you need them for your child. And if you do, they will be there for you, by your side every, single second. That, I can guarantee.

  • May 11

    The sky's your limit when your heart is in it.

  • May 9

    Lack of clinical sites, shrinking nurse educators due to retirement, RN's not choosing MSN in Education/PHD due to low salary compared to Nurse Practitioners, decreased educator to student ratio's all affect ability of nursing programs to expand... while some areas have oversaturation like in Philadelphia. Karen



    Found at CNN Money
    by Parija Kavilanz
    April 30, 2018

    Nursing schools are rejecting thousands of applicants -- in the middle of a nursing shortage

    There's an acute nursing shortage in the United States, but schools are turning away thousands of qualified applicants as they struggle to expand class size and hire more teachers for nursing programs....

    ... There are currently about three million nurses in the United States. The country will need to produce more than one million new registered nurses by 2022 to fulfill its health care needs, according to the American Nurses Association estimates.

    That's a problem.

    In 2017, nursing schools turned away more than 56,000 qualified applicants from undergraduate nursing programs. Going back a decade, nursing schools have annually rejected around 30,000 applicants who met admissions requirements, according to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. ..

    ...For one thing, nursing schools are struggling to hire more qualified teachers. "The annual national faculty vacancy rate in nursing programs is over 7%. That's pretty high," saidRosseter. "It's about two teachers per nursing school or a shortage of 1,565 teachers."
    Better pay for working nurses is luring current and potential nurse educators away from teaching. The average salary of a nurse practitioner is $97,000 compared to an average salary of $78,575 for a nursing school assistant professor, according to the American Association of Nurse Practitioners. ....
    180424190105-chart-applicants-

  • May 8

    Found at CNN.com
    May 2, 2018
    By Elizabeth Cohen, CNN Senior Medical Correspondent

    In #MeToo era, a call for more scrutiny of doctors who get arrested


    A Miami hospital's decision not to suspend a pediatric surgeon who was arrested on felony charges is renewing questions about whether hospitals are doing enough to keep patients safe from doctors who may have committed crimes.The doctor was arrested in December and accused of "cybersnooping" on his now-ex-girlfriend. Prosecutors accuse him of logging into her home security cameras almost daily -- sometimes several times a day -- without her permission or knowledge, according to an arrest warrant....

    ...Hospitals have long been criticized for being too easy on doctors who are accused of questionable behavior, and those concerns have escalated in the #MeToo era.
    Hospital disciplinary programs for doctors are mostly "a sham," according to Dr. Robert Wachter, chairman of the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. "It is undeniable that hospitals do have a tendency to protect their own, sometimes at the expense of patients," Wachter wrote in his 2005 book, "Internal Bleeding: The Truth Behind America's Terrifying Epidemic of Medical Mistakes."

    The pressure on hospitals to be tougher on doctors has increased in the past few months, with The Washington Post, NBC News and others publishing investigations of doctors' behavior.
    "The old-school view is don't take surgeons offline; they're valuable. But in the era of #MeToo, we've got to protect patients first," said Art Caplan, director of the Division of Medical Ethics at New York University Langone Medical Center.

    'Red flags'
    Protecting patients means paying attention to signs that a doctor's behavior might be troubling, said Caplan and other experts who've dealt directly with doctor discipline issues.
    These experts said that at their hospitals, the Miami surgeon, would have been suspended while the hospital undertook a full investigation. They said doctors should be suspended and investigated even if the concerns have nothing to do with their technical skills....

  • May 7

    Quote from Ptrcthllh
    If anyone know what the online service that are used by insurance companies and facilities to give guidelines base on age, service, and co- mobidities could you post it . I want to increase my knowledge in this area of nursing.
    Interqual criteria or Miliman criteria are the two programs used in Case Management/UR.

  • May 4

    The sky's your limit when your heart is in it.

  • May 3

    Hi... Thanks for offering to share your knowledge. AN members find it helpful if you start by posting a few items about this specific nursing program to get the conversation flowing.

  • May 3

    This is the best conference I've ever attended on critical care nursing-has varied topics for beginners to experts long with exibitors giving out tons free items.

  • May 2

    Found at CNN.com
    May 2, 2018
    By Elizabeth Cohen, CNN Senior Medical Correspondent

    In #MeToo era, a call for more scrutiny of doctors who get arrested


    A Miami hospital's decision not to suspend a pediatric surgeon who was arrested on felony charges is renewing questions about whether hospitals are doing enough to keep patients safe from doctors who may have committed crimes.The doctor was arrested in December and accused of "cybersnooping" on his now-ex-girlfriend. Prosecutors accuse him of logging into her home security cameras almost daily -- sometimes several times a day -- without her permission or knowledge, according to an arrest warrant....

    ...Hospitals have long been criticized for being too easy on doctors who are accused of questionable behavior, and those concerns have escalated in the #MeToo era.
    Hospital disciplinary programs for doctors are mostly "a sham," according to Dr. Robert Wachter, chairman of the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. "It is undeniable that hospitals do have a tendency to protect their own, sometimes at the expense of patients," Wachter wrote in his 2005 book, "Internal Bleeding: The Truth Behind America's Terrifying Epidemic of Medical Mistakes."

    The pressure on hospitals to be tougher on doctors has increased in the past few months, with The Washington Post, NBC News and others publishing investigations of doctors' behavior.
    "The old-school view is don't take surgeons offline; they're valuable. But in the era of #MeToo, we've got to protect patients first," said Art Caplan, director of the Division of Medical Ethics at New York University Langone Medical Center.

    'Red flags'
    Protecting patients means paying attention to signs that a doctor's behavior might be troubling, said Caplan and other experts who've dealt directly with doctor discipline issues.
    These experts said that at their hospitals, the Miami surgeon, would have been suspended while the hospital undertook a full investigation. They said doctors should be suspended and investigated even if the concerns have nothing to do with their technical skills....

  • May 1

    From Philadelphia Inquirer

    2013: A new frontier in ICU research: Postintensive care syndrome

    ...Doctors used to think patients returned to normal after the delusions and hallucinations of ICU delirium stopped. They're learning instead that some leave the hospital with terrifying false memories, often of being assaulted or imprisoned. The horrible visions help explain why a recent Johns Hopkins study found that one in four patients had post-traumatic stress symptoms two years after going home.

    Now that ICU doctors have gotten better at saving patients' lives, they are asking what comes next. The answers are disturbing.
    Researchers are finding that months - even years - after patients leave the hospital, many struggle with physical weakness, thinking problems, anxiety, depression, and PTSD. Even younger patients often cannot return to work.

    Last year, the Society of Critical Care Medicine gave the constellation of problems a name - postintensive care syndrome - and ICU doctors around the country are revamping care in hopes that the lives they save will be less troubled.

    Many of the changes - less sedation, more exercise, 24-hour visitation, dark rooms at night to encourage more normal sleep - are meant to reduce delirium. About 75 percent of ICU patients develop delirium, which is associated with poorer survival and more long-term problems....

    April 20, 2018: Words that heal: ICU journals at Penn help patients and staff

    ..... The 53-year-old Chester County man, already depleted by cancer treatments and a December bout with pneumonia, was unconscious and hooked to a breathing machine. His family was told he might not make it through the night.

    They also were given a small spiral notebook labeled ICU Healing Journal. The family could fill it with words that could help hospital staff understand who Nappi is. Doctors, nurses, and therapists would add entries offering support and explaining what Nappi was going through. The journal could help him adjust to life after the ICU - if he survived....

    ...The power of human connection

    After years of planning, Penn Presbyterian began offering the journals in January to help prevent post-intensive care syndrome, or PICS, a set of physical and emotional problems gaining attention as more people survive an ICU stay but struggle afterward.
    The journals have proven powerful for patients, as well as families and staff, said Mark Mikkelsen, a critical care doctor, who, along with Julie Rogan, an ICU clinical nurse specialist, helped start the project...

  • May 1

    The sky's your limit when your heart is in it.

  • May 1

    Found at CNN

    Hospitals offer big bonuses, free housing and tuition to recruit nurses

    "America is undergoing a massive nursing shortage. Not only are experienced nurses retiring at a rapid clip, but there aren't enough new nursing graduates to replenish the workforce, said Ross.
    The nation's aging population is exacerbating the problem. The American Nurses Association estimates the U.S. will need to produce more than one million new registered nurses by 2022 to fulfill the country's health care needs.

    UCHealth, which operates nine acute-care hospitals and more than 100 clinics across Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska, currently has 330 openings for registered nurses. Since the nonprofit health system can't find all the nurses it needs locally, it has been seeking out candidates from other states -- and sometimes other countries. ...

    ..."During economic downturns, nurses stay put in their jobs and attrition dips," she said. "When the economy is booming, attrition goes up. Nurses feel more comfortable pulling back on their hours or moving ahead with their retirement decision."

    In two-income households, if their partner is doing well financially, some nurses feel comfortable dropping out of the workforce to take a break from a grueling job, said Salka.

    The American Nurses Association's Ross worries that rich bonuses and creative perks may not go far enough to retain nurses in the long run.

    "What's to stop nurses from accepting a job because of the perks and then hop to another hospital after two years because of their perks," she said.

    A better approach would be to invest in improving the work environment for nurses and offering better pay, career development and hours to help make sure they don't burn out, she said....

  • May 1

    I've been recommending website Notes on ICU Nursing for years. Developed by 2 MICU RN's, it contains clickable list of FAQ files that they wrote for new RN's written in easy everyday nursey language with a humorous tone.


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