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NRSKarenRN, BSN, RN Moderator 130,154 Views

Joined Oct 10, '00 - from 'RN Spirit from Philly Burb'. NRSKarenRN is a PI Compliance Specialist, prior Central Intake Mgr Home Care Agency. She has '35+' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Home Care, VentsTelemetry, Home infusion'. Posts: 27,395 (22% Liked) Likes: 13,538

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  • Jun 21

    Found at ABC News
    Nurses honor tiny 'graduates' leaving the NICU

    A North Carolina hospital is celebrating babies who are ending their stay in the neonatal intensive care unit.
    The staff at CaroMont Health in Gastonia, North Carolina, honor their tiny patients with a special photo shoot and a graduation cap.
    About six months ago, Nurse Melissa Jordan began the "graduation ceremonies" after she helped care for an infant who spent 62 days in the NICU.
    On the day he was leaving, the baby's parents dressed him up in a "NICU Grad" onesie, which inspired Jordan to continue the tradition.
    "It's an emotional roller coaster for a preemie," Jordan, 28, told ABC News. "One day could be really happy and then another day there can be several setbacks. You have to be there emotionally for the parents and celebrate every single, teeny milestone."






    http://abcnews.go.com/video/embed?id=48037630

  • Jun 21

    Guidelines for Safety in the Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit - NCBI - NIH
    Guidelines for Safety in the Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit

    Olympus:

    Cleaning and Disinfection of Endoscopes Policy and Procedures


    I'd focus on PATIENT SAFETY aspect of checking equipment prior to use.... avoid procedure delay, sedation time etc.

  • Jun 19

    In most states, the Department of Health regulates Skilled Nursing Facilities, not board of nursing. Have you notified SNF administrator of these issues.... if they have not been concerned, there should be a corporate DON you should notify. It's not unusual for cash strapped corporations to be late paying bills, especially if reimbursement from Medicare/Medicaid late. If these persons appear unconcerned or hushing up issue, you can file a whistleblower complaint with Dept of Health or state Inspector General hotlines.

    Excellent advice here:
    Preparing to Blow the Whistle: A Survival Guide for Nurses - Medscape requires free registration

  • Jun 19

    In most states, the Department of Health regulates Skilled Nursing Facilities, not board of nursing. Have you notified SNF administrator of these issues.... if they have not been concerned, there should be a corporate DON you should notify. It's not unusual for cash strapped corporations to be late paying bills, especially if reimbursement from Medicare/Medicaid late. If these persons appear unconcerned or hushing up issue, you can file a whistleblower complaint with Dept of Health or state Inspector General hotlines.

    Excellent advice here:
    Preparing to Blow the Whistle: A Survival Guide for Nurses - Medscape requires free registration

  • Jun 19

    In most states, the Department of Health regulates Skilled Nursing Facilities, not board of nursing. Have you notified SNF administrator of these issues.... if they have not been concerned, there should be a corporate DON you should notify. It's not unusual for cash strapped corporations to be late paying bills, especially if reimbursement from Medicare/Medicaid late. If these persons appear unconcerned or hushing up issue, you can file a whistleblower complaint with Dept of Health or state Inspector General hotlines.

    Excellent advice here:
    Preparing to Blow the Whistle: A Survival Guide for Nurses - Medscape requires free registration

  • Jun 19

    Check your areas Office of Aging (AAA) program or Department of Health (DOH) for rules and regulations on long term care (LTC) facilities. They regulate homes where groups of unrelated persons may live together. PA medical assistance (MA) will pay operators of Long Term care facilites to care for persons who are unable to live alone and meet MA criteria. As an Ombudsman in my County, I visited all LTC facilities in an area assigned to make sure resident's rights maintained, so am familiar with PA regs...many states are similar due to medical assistance having both federal and state funding.

    In PA there are 3 levels:
    1. Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNF).
    2. Personal Care Homes (PCH).
    3. Domicilary Care Homes (DCH).

    SNF you are probably familar with. Highlighting PA regs.

    Personal Care Homes:
    1. Don't need skilled medical attention on 24hr basis.
    2. Clients problems: Limits on ADL's such as eating, bathing, grooming, or cognition
    making it impossible for elderly to live on their own.
    3. They may receive medical treatment or Homecare services: SN, PT, OT etc. from an outside provider.
    4. Need to be licensed and inspected by Dept. of Welfare.
    5. No federal regs of these homes.
    6. Most assisted living facilities fall under this category, ? limit on # beds.


    Domiciliary Care Homes
    1. Don't need skilled medical attention on 24hr basis.
    2. No major impairment of ADL's
    3. Residents receive room and board and some Limited help in ADL's like dressing, getting in and out of bed, laundry.
    4. Limited to three beds.
    5. Residents must be mobile or semi-mobile adults with no relatives or persons willing to are for them, have difficulties in some ADL's, difficulties in personal or social adjustment or difficulties resulting from disability.
    6. Dom homes are certified by AAA who perform inspections--not licensed.

    ---------------
    National Eldercare Locator
    800-677-1116 (nationwide)

    Eldercare Locator offers toll-free assistance in identifying community resources for seniors and their families. This is a public service of the Administration on Aging. It is administered by the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging and the National Association of State Units on Aging. Established in 1991, the service links you with information and referral networks of state and local area agencies on aging.

    Anyone can call the Eldercare Locator on the toll-free number, 1-800-677-1116, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., (EST).

    Please have the following information ready:

    1. County and City Name, or Zip Code.
    2. Brief description of the problem
    ----------------

    Check out: Because We Care: A Guide for People Who Care
    An online resource guide for the growing number of Americans who are caring for an older family member, adult child with disabilities, or older friend. This Guide provides information and a range of suggestions to make caregiving easier and more successful--whether you are the caregiver or the person who ensures that your family member or friend receives the best possible care from others.
    http://www.aoa.gov/wecare/

  • Jun 18

    In most states, the Department of Health regulates Skilled Nursing Facilities, not board of nursing. Have you notified SNF administrator of these issues.... if they have not been concerned, there should be a corporate DON you should notify. It's not unusual for cash strapped corporations to be late paying bills, especially if reimbursement from Medicare/Medicaid late. If these persons appear unconcerned or hushing up issue, you can file a whistleblower complaint with Dept of Health or state Inspector General hotlines.

    Excellent advice here:
    Preparing to Blow the Whistle: A Survival Guide for Nurses - Medscape requires free registration

  • Jun 17

    Found at ABC News
    Nurses honor tiny 'graduates' leaving the NICU

    A North Carolina hospital is celebrating babies who are ending their stay in the neonatal intensive care unit.
    The staff at CaroMont Health in Gastonia, North Carolina, honor their tiny patients with a special photo shoot and a graduation cap.
    About six months ago, Nurse Melissa Jordan began the "graduation ceremonies" after she helped care for an infant who spent 62 days in the NICU.
    On the day he was leaving, the baby's parents dressed him up in a "NICU Grad" onesie, which inspired Jordan to continue the tradition.
    "It's an emotional roller coaster for a preemie," Jordan, 28, told ABC News. "One day could be really happy and then another day there can be several setbacks. You have to be there emotionally for the parents and celebrate every single, teeny milestone."






    http://abcnews.go.com/video/embed?id=48037630

  • Jun 17

    Great article in May 2012 issue of American Nurse Today:
    Launching yourself in nursing leadership


    This lead me to thinking about Ways to Develop Nursing Leadership Skills:

    Participate in Workplace Committees

    Participating workplace committees allows you to learn how and why decisions are made within your institution and healthcare politics involved in decision making. Observe how committee lead and members identify issues, problem solve, and resolve (or place on back burner) issues.

    After being on the committee awhile, you will soon realize who follows through on assignments, who's ideas usually work and who's opinions are respected. Consider asking one of the leaders to mentor you.

    Attend Nursing Conferences

    Learning new skills or reinforcing ones you have instills confidence. This allows YOU to take charge of your practice in areas of interest and often rekindles that initial passion you had for the career.

    It also allows one to network, share ideas and often discover you are not alone in having issues with particular device, newest healthcare craze or that you really have it better that some other work settings. BEST destressor too!

    Join a Professional Association, Meetings and Conventions

    Nursing Associations & Organizations (National & International)

    Participate in committee work. Become a presenter at event. Serve as delegate at national conventions--- exposes you to the best minds in the nursing world. Subscribe to a Nursing Journal

    Read each issue to keep abreast of evidenced based practices and emerging trends. Discuss info with colleagues at work.

    Meet Periodically with Nurse Educators

    Request training in areas of weakness or desire to learn more in-depth knowledge.

    Float to Other Units

    Floating to other units helps you to learn how others perform work -- can be better (or worse) than home unit. Helps to learn what NOT to do and learn to spread your wings.

    Read books on Leadership

    Read books beyond healthcare leadership. Look online for book reviews re leadership. Many hospitals have medical libraries which loan out books.

    Time and Experience

    Learning occurs over time and living through the shared healthcare experiences your patients have: unheard of diseases, code or rapid response situations, death and dying, difficult patients, "your the best nurse" moments, wrangling with physicians and other staff learning to be assertive for patients needs.

    Additional education

    Consider improving your education to move to the next level in nursing.

    Keep posting away at AN

    As I reflect back on my career, these are tips that I unconsciously utilized to prepare me to become a charge nurse and later Department Manager.

    Start out small and add these into your career mix over the coming months and years and you will soon evolve into the unit leader.

  • Jun 16

    Found at ABC News
    Nurses honor tiny 'graduates' leaving the NICU

    A North Carolina hospital is celebrating babies who are ending their stay in the neonatal intensive care unit.
    The staff at CaroMont Health in Gastonia, North Carolina, honor their tiny patients with a special photo shoot and a graduation cap.
    About six months ago, Nurse Melissa Jordan began the "graduation ceremonies" after she helped care for an infant who spent 62 days in the NICU.
    On the day he was leaving, the baby's parents dressed him up in a "NICU Grad" onesie, which inspired Jordan to continue the tradition.
    "It's an emotional roller coaster for a preemie," Jordan, 28, told ABC News. "One day could be really happy and then another day there can be several setbacks. You have to be there emotionally for the parents and celebrate every single, teeny milestone."






    http://abcnews.go.com/video/embed?id=48037630

  • Jun 16

    Found at ABC News
    Nurses honor tiny 'graduates' leaving the NICU

    A North Carolina hospital is celebrating babies who are ending their stay in the neonatal intensive care unit.
    The staff at CaroMont Health in Gastonia, North Carolina, honor their tiny patients with a special photo shoot and a graduation cap.
    About six months ago, Nurse Melissa Jordan began the "graduation ceremonies" after she helped care for an infant who spent 62 days in the NICU.
    On the day he was leaving, the baby's parents dressed him up in a "NICU Grad" onesie, which inspired Jordan to continue the tradition.
    "It's an emotional roller coaster for a preemie," Jordan, 28, told ABC News. "One day could be really happy and then another day there can be several setbacks. You have to be there emotionally for the parents and celebrate every single, teeny milestone."






    http://abcnews.go.com/video/embed?id=48037630

  • Jun 16

    Found PR Newswire:
    News provided by American Association of Nurse Practitioners
    06 Jun, 2017,

    More than 234,000 licensed nurse practitioners in the United States


    More than 234,000 nurse practitioners (NPs) are licensed in the United States, according to the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP), which today released its latest count. The workforce has nearly doubled since 2007 when there were an estimated 120,000 NPs....

    ...The NP workforce is growing at a fast rate. An additional 23,000 new NPs graduated from programs in the 2015 – 2016 academic year, up 3,000 graduates, or 15.5%, from the 2014 – 2015 academic year. An estimated 85.5% of new graduates have been trained in primary care. Nearly two out of three new graduates will graduate from family NP programs. By 2024, the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that the NP profession will have grown by 35% compared to 30% for physician assistants and 13% for physicians (this excludes anesthesiologists and surgeons).

  • Jun 14

    Found at ABC News
    Nurses honor tiny 'graduates' leaving the NICU

    A North Carolina hospital is celebrating babies who are ending their stay in the neonatal intensive care unit.
    The staff at CaroMont Health in Gastonia, North Carolina, honor their tiny patients with a special photo shoot and a graduation cap.
    About six months ago, Nurse Melissa Jordan began the "graduation ceremonies" after she helped care for an infant who spent 62 days in the NICU.
    On the day he was leaving, the baby's parents dressed him up in a "NICU Grad" onesie, which inspired Jordan to continue the tradition.
    "It's an emotional roller coaster for a preemie," Jordan, 28, told ABC News. "One day could be really happy and then another day there can be several setbacks. You have to be there emotionally for the parents and celebrate every single, teeny milestone."






    http://abcnews.go.com/video/embed?id=48037630

  • Jun 13

    Found PR Newswire:
    News provided by American Association of Nurse Practitioners
    06 Jun, 2017,

    More than 234,000 licensed nurse practitioners in the United States


    More than 234,000 nurse practitioners (NPs) are licensed in the United States, according to the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP), which today released its latest count. The workforce has nearly doubled since 2007 when there were an estimated 120,000 NPs....

    ...The NP workforce is growing at a fast rate. An additional 23,000 new NPs graduated from programs in the 2015 – 2016 academic year, up 3,000 graduates, or 15.5%, from the 2014 – 2015 academic year. An estimated 85.5% of new graduates have been trained in primary care. Nearly two out of three new graduates will graduate from family NP programs. By 2024, the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that the NP profession will have grown by 35% compared to 30% for physician assistants and 13% for physicians (this excludes anesthesiologists and surgeons).

  • May 30

    Guidelines for Safety in the Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit - NCBI - NIH
    Guidelines for Safety in the Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit

    Olympus:

    Cleaning and Disinfection of Endoscopes Policy and Procedures


    I'd focus on PATIENT SAFETY aspect of checking equipment prior to use.... avoid procedure delay, sedation time etc.


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