Latest Comments by TheCommuter

TheCommuter, BSN, RN Moderator 294,460 Views

You reached my profile page! I'm a case management RN as well as a rehabilitation nurse with CRRN certification. I accrued four years of experience as a licensed vocational nurse (LVN) prior to becoming an RN in 2010. I take pleasure in learning new tidbits regularly. Please read my assortment of blog posts and articles and feel free to comment if any content I've posted has sparked your interest.

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    sevensonnets likes this.

    Moved to the Emergency Nursing forum for more replies.

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    I will keep my comment short and to the point: prudent nurses will question and/or clarify physicians' orders instead of following them blindly and unquestioningly.

    There's an order for 80MEQ of potassium chloride via IV push, so would you give it? Would you question it? I'd give it only if I was employed at a prison and my patient was a confirmed death row inmate scheduled to die via lethal injection that day.

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    Irka likes this.

    I was an LPN before becoming an RN. I've completed three different programs: an LPN program, an LPN to ASN transition program, and an online BSN program.

    Out of the three, the LPN program was the most difficult for me. The LPN to ASN program was not as difficult, and the online BSN program was ridiculously easy.

    Therefore, do not assume that LPN programs are easier.

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    Roasted.Peanuts likes this.

    I am not one who candy-coats reality. You need to honestly assess why you have been unable to earn 'A' or 'B' grades in your anatomy coursework.

    If your performance in these courses was the result of life's distractions (e.g., grieving the death of a loved one, working too many hours, abusive situation), go ahead and retake them. Strive for better grades.

    If your performance was due partly to poor study skills, buckle down and adopt better study skills before retaking. Figure out what type of learner you are. Conjure up a study plan that meshes with your personal learning style.

    Meanwhile, if your performance was due to difficulty understanding the material, I do not see the point of retaking these courses. Some Pollyannish respondents will say, "Never give up!"

    However, some people have the academic horsepower to pull it off and others simply do not. Being passionate alone will not cut it in a course that expects students to know the structure of a nephron and/or describe the phases of the cardiac cycle from start to end.

    Only you know which category you fall into. Good luck to you!

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    vintagemother and poppycat like this.

    Quote from GGertie
    I was offered a job in insurance, but sitting at a desk all day sounds even more dreadful.
    I am employed by an insurance company. The flexibility is undeniably awesome and I feel so very fortunate to have this job.

    However, I work from a home-based office. I would be less satisfied if I had to join the rat race to commute to an office park every morning. These days, my commute consists of a few steps from the master bedroom to a spare bedroom that serves as my office space.
    Quote from GGertie
    I've considered going back for my RN, but I'm not entirely sure this will bring me anymore job satisfaction and I may actually take a pay cut the first few years.
    I was once an LPN. Earning my RN licensure has opened up a host of opportunities in addition to increased salary for less strenuous work.

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    Moved to our Student NP forum for more feedback and suggestions.

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    Moved to our Canadian Nursing forum for more feedback.

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    Many people who hated working as CNAs actually enjoy the licensed nursing role.

    With regards to the invisible healthcare hierarchical structure, CNAs and patient care techs have mountains of backbreaking work and responsibilities for low pay, but no authority. It is a tough predicament that few would envy.

    As a nurse, at least you have a small semblance of authority and earn higher pay for the sheer number of duties for which you are responsible.

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    You are located in either California or Texas if you are using the 'LVN' title.

    If you are in CA, your employment options will be severely limited without the BSN degree. Most employment markets in CA are saturated with new grad RNs, so the BSN degree is used to effectively weed out more than half of the job applicant pool.

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    NurseSpeedy likes this.

    In my experience, many of the smaller employers that are owned by sole proprietors or partnerships do not always require drug testing prior to employment.

    I am referring to family-owned nursing homes as well as privately owned hospices, home health companies, personal care group homes, etc.

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    Your thread has been moved to our Ohio University forum:

    http://allnurses.com/ohio-university-online/

  • 0

    We moved your thread to our Nursing Programs forum: http://allnurses.com/online-nursing-schools/

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  • 0

    We moved your thread to our Nursing Programs forum: http://allnurses.com/online-nursing-schools/


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