Latest Likes For uRNmyway

Latest Likes For uRNmyway

uRNmyway 17,308 Views

Joined Jan 28, '12 - from 'Somewhere'. uRNmyway is a Registered Nurse. She has 'Roughly 5 years.' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Med-surg, mother-baby'. Posts: 1,163 (59% Liked) Likes: 2,264

Sorted By Last Like Received (Max 500)
  • Apr 26

    Quote from Suninmyheart
    I am with you on this one scampi - I hope I never become so jaded that I would snicker at this. I don't care how many people tell me to "get over myself" or that it is how nurses deal with stress. It is tragic and this girl needs help if not a compassionate direct answer at the least.

    Signed student, ...with rose colored glasses?
    Oh for Gods sakes guys...given some of the utter geniuses we have been made aware of, did you consider that maybe she was responsible for this bestiality? Teenager becoming aware of her body? Peanut butter episode gone too far or something? I mean, maybe the dog is the real victim here! :P

    The only intervention I can think of is another round of sex ed along with some counseling...

  • Apr 16

    Yea, H1b is extremely difficult. Last I heard, waiting list was like, 4 years or some such.

    You have to keep in mind the employment situation in the US right now. There are AMERICAN nurses galore who cannot find work. Why in the world would an employer spend all the time and money necessary to hire a foreign nurse when they can save all the trouble and cost by hiring their own?
    I was told that part of the H1b application involved the employer needing to prove their TRIED to hire an American nurse, but no one qualified. With this economy and frantic, unemployed nurses, I don't think this is realistic.

  • Mar 31

    Quote from kathynurse46
    I had pt with g-tube who somnvitedo iut whe how got off unit glad i wasnt working that day !!!!! but invited some of the other residence to bar when staff showed up they were all drunk pt on bar waving her depends

    Um, can I buy a vowel?

  • Mar 9

    Quote from Alisonisayoshi
    I just want to mention there are side effects and consequences to pot. Sorry to burst a smokers bubble, but there are. Currently pot is decriminalized. In some states it's even "legal" for medical use (where I live the Feds are suing our county to put an end to reckless medical use and growth but its currently legal).
    Here's my b@$ch about pot: hey did you know your casual use is a blight on MY community? Yup it is. My cute, picturesque, small town is now overrun by MS13. We have murders, assaults, and skyrocketing crime rates all relating to pot. Pot is big business. So that joint you are smoking, that one joint? Yeah just know somebody might have been murdered for that. Seems crazy just for pot, but this cash crop is poisoning the land and water, it's inciting violence, and it's doing it in SOMEONE'S back yard.
    Please don't act like its some victimless crime to smoke. It's not.

    Well, you realize that is one of the biggest arguments FOR decriminalizing and/or legalizing right? If something is legal, you don't need to resort to criminals and gangs to get it for you. Jus' sayin'.

  • Mar 5

    Quote from rita359
    You'd be surprised at some of the things new nurses come out of school and have never done.

    My advise is , whenever in clinicals, be sure nurses know you want to at least watch anything interesting even if you can't talk your instructor into letting you do it.
    I did that in all the clinical settings I went to. I told the nurses if they had something they thought I should see and learn, to please let me know! My teachers were also aware that I wanted to see as much as I could.
    I later used that when I was an RN and knew students would be coming around that day. I worked until 8am, they came in at 7am. So I made sure to keep blood work until they came around and asked them if any of them wanted to do it. The teachers loved it, and the students loved even more that I volunteered to go with them instead of their teacher, since I knew how much it would stress me out to have them breathing down my neck doing new skills...

  • Jan 26

    Had a patient come in for abdominal pain. Our on-call GI doc wrote after a very detailed assessment note: "I have NO CLUE what is going on!"

  • Jan 9

    Had a patient come in for abdominal pain. Our on-call GI doc wrote after a very detailed assessment note: "I have NO CLUE what is going on!"

  • Jan 6

    Quote from kathynurse46
    I had pt with g-tube who somnvitedo iut whe how got off unit glad i wasnt working that day !!!!! but invited some of the other residence to bar when staff showed up they were all drunk pt on bar waving her depends

    Um, can I buy a vowel?

  • Jan 1

    Forget working a shift with the foley...sometimes I just wish I could take it home with me. That way I can get sleep uninterrupted with bathroom breaks!

  • Dec 27 '15

    Had a patient come in for abdominal pain. Our on-call GI doc wrote after a very detailed assessment note: "I have NO CLUE what is going on!"

  • Nov 14 '15

    Ok, seriously, how many of these most embarrassing stories involve patient genitals lol?!

    My most embarrassing I described in another thread recently (gel disinfectant, in my eye, first day of my first nursing job).
    To follow with others and their genital stories, and describe my most RECENT embarrassing story, I recently was doing a skin check on a new patient. Pt was a young male. You guessed it, under his underwear, clear as day, you could make out his very obvious erection. He just has this look on his face that begged not to pull away his underwear. Normally I couldn't care less about that kind of thing, but his embarrassment made me embarrassed. I checked everything except what was under his underwear, asked if his skin was intact there too, and walked out. I don't know who was more relieved not to continue that awkward encounter.

    ETA. To clarify, I don't care about pts having weird physical um, reactions. Doesn't phase me. I do care about patients feeling bad or embarrassed about something.

  • Sep 20 '15

    Quote from Pudnluv
    Had a woman come in for "seizures". She had a long list of meds including po morphine. On her allergies, morphine was listed. When I asked her about it, she told me she was allergic to IV morphine and had to have dilaudid instead. She then told me she was due for her pain meds and ativan and needed them immediately. I explained that she would have to wait to be seen by the MD prior to getting any meds. A few minutes later, she proceeded to have a "seizure". Another nurse and I went in and did the Oklahoma seizure test on her, which she passed with flying colors. To do the Oklahoma seizure test, have two nurses at the bedside, on next to the patient and the other at the foot of the bed. The nurse at the side of the bed asks the other nurse how to perform the test. The nurse at the foot of the bed explains (out loud) to rub the inside of the left foot (all while actually performing said task) and the right arm will twitch. Yep, my patient's right arm definitely started twitching when her left foot was rubbed. We were laughing so hard, we had to leave the room. Consequently, she received no meds during her stay.
    I've been told about a stiff arm test too. Hold the patients arm over their head and let it drop. See if it hits them in the face or if they move it.

    Recently really annoyed a patient lol. She was insisting that her IV dilaudid caused intense pruritis(wow, my phone auto-corrected that to prostitutes!), of course not relieved by P.O. benadryl, had to be IV. Then the dosage wasn't enough. So I got the order changed to tramadol (which was way more appropriate for her pain type anyways). When she asked for pain meds and I brought her tramadol, she flipped. I explained that her increasing pruritis was concerning to me, that it might be an allergic reaction building up, and I didn't want to end up with an anaphylactic reaction.
    All of a sudden, the itching wasn't really all that bad, it was tolerable, really. 'I was just a bit itchy, the benadryl wasn't helping, but I need my IV dilaudid back. That really did help my pain a whole lot'
    Insert eye roll RIGHT here.

  • Sep 3 '15

    Quote from Pudnluv
    Had a woman come in for "seizures". She had a long list of meds including po morphine. On her allergies, morphine was listed. When I asked her about it, she told me she was allergic to IV morphine and had to have dilaudid instead. She then told me she was due for her pain meds and ativan and needed them immediately. I explained that she would have to wait to be seen by the MD prior to getting any meds. A few minutes later, she proceeded to have a "seizure". Another nurse and I went in and did the Oklahoma seizure test on her, which she passed with flying colors. To do the Oklahoma seizure test, have two nurses at the bedside, on next to the patient and the other at the foot of the bed. The nurse at the side of the bed asks the other nurse how to perform the test. The nurse at the foot of the bed explains (out loud) to rub the inside of the left foot (all while actually performing said task) and the right arm will twitch. Yep, my patient's right arm definitely started twitching when her left foot was rubbed. We were laughing so hard, we had to leave the room. Consequently, she received no meds during her stay.
    I've been told about a stiff arm test too. Hold the patients arm over their head and let it drop. See if it hits them in the face or if they move it.

    Recently really annoyed a patient lol. She was insisting that her IV dilaudid caused intense pruritis(wow, my phone auto-corrected that to prostitutes!), of course not relieved by P.O. benadryl, had to be IV. Then the dosage wasn't enough. So I got the order changed to tramadol (which was way more appropriate for her pain type anyways). When she asked for pain meds and I brought her tramadol, she flipped. I explained that her increasing pruritis was concerning to me, that it might be an allergic reaction building up, and I didn't want to end up with an anaphylactic reaction.
    All of a sudden, the itching wasn't really all that bad, it was tolerable, really. 'I was just a bit itchy, the benadryl wasn't helping, but I need my IV dilaudid back. That really did help my pain a whole lot'
    Insert eye roll RIGHT here.

  • Aug 25 '15

    Had a patient come in for abdominal pain. Our on-call GI doc wrote after a very detailed assessment note: "I have NO CLUE what is going on!"

  • Aug 23 '15

    Had a patient come in for abdominal pain. Our on-call GI doc wrote after a very detailed assessment note: "I have NO CLUE what is going on!"


close
close