Latest Comments by 100kids

Latest Comments by 100kids

100kids, BSN, RN 6,568 Views

Joined Dec 7, '11. Posts: 741 (55% Liked) Likes: 1,035

Sorted By Last Comment (Past 5 Years)
  • 1
    Farawyn likes this.

    I send a letter home with each child in April/May spelling out exactly what they will need for the start of the next school year. Once school starts I send my own letter first for the ones I am missing and then one signed by the principal for the ones still missing even with a warning. I mother my own children I don't want to mother every kid in the building! Is that really too much to ask? Some days these parents really get to me...

  • 0

    Quote from Jen-Elizabeth
    Yep, but I also wish they would change the orders. Anyone gave give an Epi-pen. It is so easy to use.

    I tell my teachers that they will never regret giving it; they may regret not giving it.
    I tell my teachers if you have any concerns/doubts give the epi.

  • 0

    Quote from C.MackeyRN
    Also, I kind of feel the student is old enough to carry her own epi on her person. Unless its just against NY policy for them to carry it with them. I feel she should keep it in her purse or back pack. I have several students on my campus who have epipens that they keep with them as well as those with inhalers. Naturally, we have a medication form on file with their doctor signature signing off on whether they've been educated on it. I follow up on it as well and once they show they can administer it correctly, they keep it with them. But 15....I think she should be allowed to start taking ownership of her allergy and carry her epi on her. But this is just my opinion.
    NY law allows for students to self carry with physician and parental permission. The School Nurse also assesses whether the student is fully able to understand the When, Why and How of their medication before allowing them to self-carry. I have Elementary School kids who carry their own epi pens so now sure why this was not done with this student. Again we don't have the full story so we are all just guessing.

  • 1
    GdBSN likes this.

    If kids are hungry I feed them. I ask the staff for food donations throughout the year and use them for forgotten snacks, lunch or didn't eat. I know some of these kids don't have a lot of resources at home and if I feed them something they are able to be more productive in class and learn. There are a few kids I take right from the bus and feed almost every day just to give them a good start to the day because I know breakfast is often not offered at home. Are your free lunch students eligible for free breakfast? I know some schools do that. We have no cafeteria food service so it's me or no one so I make it happen if I can. My students are younger so it's less about their choices and more about their parents and home situation.

  • 3

    It's a big list here, as is often the case in small schools. I am in charge of attendance, dismissal and any changes, teaching Health classes, missing/forgotten lunches and anything else, database administration, graduation, community outreach, social work, there's more I'm just blocking out right now. LOL This is why each day I leave here wondering where the day went. Wearing all these hats really helps me to know all of the students and their families and I love that! My first priority is the health and safety of the kids and everyone knows it, the other stuff has to wait if I have an emergency. Somehow we have made it work.

  • 2

    Quote from coughdrop.2.go
    I think this has to do more with education to the providers. Most of the allergist I speak to prefer Epi to Benadryl. I even went to a school nursing training last year and we had a pretty predominate allergist specialist speak to us about allergies and why Epinephrine is always the first line and how Benadryl can mostly fail to delay anaphylaxis. It was a great speech and changed a lot of people's mind about treating allergies.
    I agree and would love to see more physicians write their orders for school this way.

  • 1
    BCgradnurse likes this.

    Quote from Flare
    But if a student came to be saying that they ingested their allergen and felt they needed their epipen i would not debate it with them - i'd just give it to them. .
    ABSOLUTELY!!!

  • 0

    in NY we do it for all new entrants plus in certain grades but not every year.

  • 6

    Quote from coughdrop.2.go
    I'm appalled the Nurse delayed the Epi-Pen and emergency services. Epi is always the first line for an allergic reaction. Benadryl is putting a band-aid on it. Our anaphylaxis procedure:
    1) Epi-Pen
    2) Call 911
    3) Hook up to nebulizer if student in Health Center
    4) Benadryl via liquid or IM.

    Epinephrine is always the first line treatment. I don't care if you aren't sure if it's an allergic reaction or not. Give it.
    Unfortunately I bet many of us have Doctor's orders for our students that say otherwise. Very few of my students with allergies have Epinephrine as the first line of treatment per their physician/allergist. I wish we knew more of the story but am so glad the girl survived!

  • 0

    I haven't had this in my district but have been contacted by other local districts seeing if I wanted to work after school as a 1:1 Nurse for an athlete with diabetes or epilepsy. By law the school cannot exclude the child from school activities or require a parent to be there so if they need a Nurse onsite per their IEP or 504, the school pays an RN to sit at practice and go to games when a parent in unable. I have a friend who went o basketball practice everyday for 2 months last year for 1 student. Mom and Dad could go to games but not practices so the school hired her to be the student's nurse for sports.

  • 1
    Farawyn likes this.

    Quote from Jen-Elizabeth
    I'm back and late to the party! I'm here after two weeks of drowning in paperwork. Now I'm sending out MORE paperwork to get all the MISSING paperwork.

    And launching my teaching load (6 classes a week this quarter). But I am so glad to be back with you guys!
    The missing paperwork is the worst! I have 4 classes I'm teaching each week so I am busy, busy planning. Somehow things never seem to go exactly as I plan... but it's all good.

  • 1
    MrNurse(x2) likes this.

    I call if I need clothes or if it happens regularly. Otherwise they get a note home with their clothes for washing. The note says to please return any clothing that was borrowed (except for the underwear) and asks them to please keep a bag with an extra set of clothes for their child in their backpack for future use if needed. Remember there are some parents you will never be able to keep happy and that's ok. You didn't leave this child in wet or soiled clothes all day-in my book that's what really matters. Some parents who send in notes about how irate they are about feeding their child lunch when they forgot(we have no food service) or giving them a jacket to wear when it's cold out, etc. I just want to send their nasty note back with a big "You're welcome" on it. Some people are just ungrateful and it makes me crazy!

  • 0
  • 4
    BeckyESRN, SnugglePuggle, Farawyn, and 1 other like this.

    I gave my children, nieces and nephews a canvas paint about 5 years ago and let them paint whatever they wanted on it. They have made great artwork for my Nurse's Office. They are bright and cheerful and perfect for an elementary school and it was an inexpensive way to decorate. Everyone comments on them.

  • 2
    NutmeggeRN and MrNurse(x2) like this.

    The kids call me Mrs. Last Name (or Aunt First Name as I have 3 in the building with me that I am their Aunt and some of their friends think they should be able to call me that too. It all works for me). Almost all of the staff calls me by my first name unless we are in front on students.


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