Content That 100kids Likes

100kids, BSN, RN 9,309 Views

Joined Dec 7, '11. Posts: 801 (56% Liked) Likes: 1,148

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  • Sep 25

    Quote from 100kids
    I love salt water gargles for sore throat. It also helps determine who is faking. No one really likes a salt water gargle BUT if they are really suffering I find most kids will try it.
    Same as the kids who "threw up in the bathroom". When they decline the offer a little mouthwash, I find it highly suspicious that they infact truly vomitted!

  • Sep 25

    i tend to call for things that will leave a mark or need follow up or for "those parents"

  • Sep 21

    Quote from SullyRN
    It takes a village. And sadly a lot of people don't have that village.
    But those people still need to have a plan and then back ups to that plan. My closet family member is 300+ miles away. It's just me, Mr Wine and the baby. We literally have 4 different pick up plans JUST IN CASE.

  • Sep 21

    I'm not trying to get all up in the middle of this but I think the point is being missed here; the school nurse's role is getting confused and parents need to understand that it does not matter where you work, if you are a parent you have responsibilities. If your child is too sick to be in school (per policy and the school nurse's nursing judgement), you need to remove them from the school. A fever indicates an illness that might not even warrant a doctor's visit BUT WARRANTS ABSENCE FROM SCHOOL. I don't care who you are or what kind of job you have, take care of your parental responsibilities. If your job isn't great for leaving suddenly for a sick kid, find another way to get your kid home or get another job.

    Yes, I have worked in hospital settings. I left those settings because my kids were starting school and I knew leaving work for them might be an issue. I work a job that earns less money so I can take care of my responsibilities as a parent.

    No, you cannot just leave your sick child in my office all day because you "can't leave work". The school is not a daycare and the nurse's office is not a hospital room.

  • Sep 21

    Quote from WineRN
    This is why someone asked if you were a school nurse. It's protocol in nearly all districts to send home for a fever, because as you know a fever is just a symptom of else in the body, and most of the time that something else in contagious. We have immunocompromised kids in a lot of our schools that we need to watch out for too and tons of daily meds and treatments and it's not fair to those kids to get exposed to someone else who is sick and in the office simply because their parent doesn't think they are "sick enough" to go home.
    This.

    Also, I ask people to pause for a moment and remember how one can feel when your temp hits 100. I got slammed by a bug at the start of school and had a temp of 101. I rarely run temps. I was a miserable mess. The fever broke a few hours later, but man, it was not fun, even after acetaminophen dosing. And I had the luxury of being able to curl up in my bed.

    My office cot is lumpy. I don't have a separate room for it, so it is the far corner of my office. The student with a fever is welcome to occupy it, but they will also be privy to my harsh overheard light I can't just shut off because I need it on to properly access other students. This student with a fever could be home in their own bed. Plus, imagine a bus ride home feeling miserable. Sure, we all suffer through it as adults, but even I've called my husband for a ride when I'm sick.

    Now do I call CPS for this? Of course not, unless it is repeat thing (and by repeat, I mean happens several times with no response, etc). I'm also not calling an ambulance unless fever progresses to dangerous levels and I still cannot get in touch with a parent or get a parent to pick up their child. But I do use above 100.4 as my absolute for pickup, because I've yet to see a student with a temp of that or above not look miserable.

    And the OP had a student with a temp of 103. That is not an insignificant borderline temp.

  • Sep 21

    Quote from LM NY
    No, I am not a school nurse. I do not think that is relevant.
    And that is the point. If you do not live and work in our shoes. You can't possibly understand our point. I don't want to sound short. I am merely stating simple truth. Is making a Hotline call the first thing any of us would do for a kid with a fever? Nope. Do we look at the whole situation, history, etc. Well Yes, We. Do. If our gut tells us this needs more intervention than we have at hand. A Hotline call could very well be in order. There is nothing "one size fits all" in our practice of School Nursing.

  • Sep 21

    Thank you everyone!! Cheers to all the school nurses

  • Sep 20

    No student deaths or injuries causing permanent damage. An excellent goal. Anything else is unreasonable.

  • Sep 19

    Quote from NutmeggeRN
    Oh, I dunno...maybe a current Medication Permission form signed by parent AND prescriber, a current asthma action plan, or diabetic care plan, or Epi pen plan or EMERGENCY TREATMENT PERMISSION!!!!!!

    I know, I am very needy today
    I knew, silly. I just wanted to crank you up.

  • Sep 19

    Quote from Farawyn
    Yes. What paperwork?
    Oh, I dunno...maybe a current Medication Permission form signed by parent AND prescriber, a current asthma action plan, or diabetic care plan, or Epi pen plan or EMERGENCY TREATMENT PERMISSION!!!!!!

    I know, I am very needy today

  • Sep 19

    Quote from GdBSN
    ^^^Yes!^^^ If this student has had this condition since 1st grade, why did Mom not have the proper paper work completed in the clinic. Parents get lazy and don't do what they are supposed to, and then want to blame someone when something happens.
    This is why I have NO regrets sending emails explaining EMS is a ten minute response and brain death occurs in four. Do not put me in a position where I know what to do but do not have the tools to do it. I never want to replay the what ifs because the inactions of a parent.

  • Sep 19

    I can't tell you how many times a kid has come up with something like hydrocortisone cream, or calamine lotion asking me to put it on. I'm like "UGH!! If only you would've sneaked into the bathroom like any other kid and put it on without me knowing! Now I gotta call yer Momma."

  • Sep 19

    Quote from NutmeggeRN
    And it seems that when they get to HS, all bets are off for paperwork....I am chasing paper ALL. DAY. LONG!!!!
    That said, I would much rather they have the inhaler than the paperwork, but one can only hope the inhaler is the one prescribed to them and that it is not expired!
    This is the issue I have in HS also. I have told my teachers to never deny a student use of their inhaler if they need it in class. Then send them to the clinic if they don't have a self-carry form on file.

  • Sep 19

    And it seems that when they get to HS, all bets are off for paperwork....I am chasing paper ALL. DAY. LONG!!!!
    That said, I would much rather they have the inhaler than the paperwork, but one can only hope the inhaler is the one prescribed to them and that it is not expired!

  • Sep 19

    ^^^Yes!^^^ If this student has had this condition since 1st grade, why did Mom not have the proper paper work completed in the clinic. Parents get lazy and don't do what they are supposed to, and then want to blame someone when something happens. Our policy clearly states, that a student is not to have an inhaler at school unless proper documentation has been submitted. Not to say, I would not let them use there inhaler if they were having an asthma attack and address the paperwork issue with parents when they came to pick them up. Technically, I could probably lose my job for letting them use the inhaler, but I guess I would take that chance if the attack was severe enough.


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