Latest Comments by lululucy

lululucy 2,930 Views

Joined Aug 10, '11. Posts: 28 (18% Liked) Likes: 12

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    Quote from aet111
    Hi, I'm a RN, BSN, living in the NY Metro Area. I am considering applying to Frontier for their WHNP or FNP program. Are there any Frontier grads from NY among us? I would love to hear about your experience and how you were able to secure clinicals, etc. THANKS in advance!
    You had asked the same exact question I was considering of asking. I'm also from NY and would love to hear from anyone who's a New Yorker and goes to Frontier. Btw, since you posted this thread a year ago, did you apply there eventually? and yes, how did you like it?

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    I'm currently enrolled in NYU's APN program, however, I'm reconsidering if I should apply to Frontier's FNP program. Season being, NYU doesn't offer part time FNP(for now), and it is more flexible. I'm still debating and wondering if this is a smart move. Your advice is greatly appreciated! What are pros and cons if I switch program? please reach out to me if you are from NYC and also applying to Frontier.

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    To mom2michael: hi, I also have a question about the preceptorship at Frontier. I'm interested in the FNP program, how many preceptors do I need to locate in order to complete the program? Can I stay with one? Do you know if it is easy to locate fnps in NYC? Thank you in IAdvance

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    Hello, I got accepted to the NYU adult primary program back when I was in my undergraduate and just recently found out that if I decide to transfer to their new FNP program, I have to do full time. I'm strongly considering applying to FNU now, not only because I've heard so many positive comments, but also because I can do part time online. I don't know if this is a smart move. And how easy is it to find a preceptor in NYC? Also, seeking to talk to anyone from NYC who is applying or is already in the program. Thank you!

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    Hi Siri,

    I'm currently debating whether to go into midwifery or FNP. I know I want to do something related to OB but didn't know if FNP will offer that opportunity for me to work with OB patients. You mentioned in your post that you worked as an OB-GYN NP, can you tell me what role you took as an NP on a daily basis, and if it was in a clinic or hospital setting? Any other tips and advice will be helpful and greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance!

    Lululucy

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    Hi ladies! I'm a fellow NYU student. Currently I'm enrolled in the duo degree program and going back to school to get my masters in nursing. I'm having a very hard time deciding whether to follow my passion for Midwifery or do Fnp since it's a safer route. I don't know where in the progress you guys are in this program, but would like to hear from you about this program at NYU. I just have a few questions, if you can kindly answer for me.

    1) Is it a rigorous program? What is the program composed of in terms of clinicals and classes?
    2) Does it have both online and in-class courses? I signed up for research this summer and it has both.
    3) Did you do full time or part time work while attending school?
    4) How's the job market currently? Were you able to find a mentor or an internship?
    5) Did NYU offer clinical settings or do you have to go find one yourself?
    6) How's the liability and malpractice insurance for midwifery?
    7) where are you intend to work after graduation? at a hospital setting? private clinic? birthing center?

    I'm excited about this journey ahead, but just need a little push on the way. Any tips and information would be helpful and appreciated!

    Thanks in advance!

    Lululucy

  • 2
    Meriwhen and fiveofpeep like this.

    Quote from ruby vee
    despite the op's many complaints about her preceptor, i'm not sure that there was any actual bullying going on. perhaps the op's high expectations for her preceptor weren't met. a lot of support, patience and "a hand of guidance" are all nice ideals, but they're also very subjective. what looks like support and guidance to one person may look like hovering and second guessing to another, and if there wasn't any real communication going on between preceptor and orientee, expectations are going to remain unmet.

    i'm struck by the op's fixation on exchanging greetings and her idea that the preceptor was not enthusiastic enough in doing so. that and the complaint about "gossiping with another co-worker." one thing that new nurses frequently do not understand is that it is the preceptors job to communicate with co-workers about their orientee's progress (or lack thereof). if the preceptor was discussing the orientee with a charge nurse, an assistant nurse manager, a staff educator on the unit level, a member of the unit's education or orientation committees or another preceptor who might possibly be working with the orientee at some future date it isn't "gossiping". it's necessary communication.

    if the orientee's greetings were truly being rebuffed (as opposed to not being answered as enthusiastically as she might wish), that might be interpreted as being rude, but it's hardly bullying. the preceptor's response to the orientee's attempts to give report might also be rude but is hardly bullying. one other interpretation might be that the preceptor had tried to teach the orientee the accepted format for report and the orientee wasn't following that format and/or was giving the impression that she wasn't interesting in learning or following the accepted format. the op's noting that the preceptor was "closed off to her" because, in the preceptor's words, the op was resistant to learning makes me wonder if the op was having difficulty in learning the norms of the unit.

    i'm sure we're not getting the whole story here, just the original poster's rather emotional side of things. i hope the op can step back enough from the situation to consider some of the advice she's been given and hopefully learn from it.

    thank you for your sincere third person perspective. it was nice to see it from another person's interpretation of this event. in reference to "gossiping with another co-worker", i realized this is very common on the floor, and the co-worker she's talking to isn't the charge nurse of my night shift, she was just a co-worker (she wasn't my preceptor at the time of this incident, rather a former preceptor). i would appreciate if she discuss my mistakes with me, instead of talking to a third party, whom has no business to intervene. it would be a different story if she was communicating to a nursing educator or another preceptor of my progress to enhance my work performance, rather they were merely talking about that "i should have known to do that".

    some co-workers have told me to be on her best side. i really tried. i can't change her perception of me.

    nonetheless, i don't want to prove who's right or wrong at this moment. my only desire is to learn from people who have overcome such unfortunate experience and learn from them. i really thought a lot since that day, and have decided to really tackle and thrive in this obstacle, and to learn to build my inner self.

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    Quote from whitey_fisk
    I respectfully disagree. Making the OP walk down to pharmacy and having pharmacy explain the procedure? Isn't that what preceptors are supposed to do?

    From the sound of it, the OP didn't "tattle" but ran into someone who realized she was visibly upset.

    I do agree with the other posters that you will have to develop a "thicker skin." You have to use your assessment skills on co-workers and realize who you can trust and ask questions openly, and ironically, sometimes it's not those who should be helping you.

    Personally, I have found that standing your ground with "bullies" stops the behavior, i.e. being direct with them, not involving management. Running away is not the answer. Just remain confident and focus on the patients.
    Thanks for your encouragement and clarification of my entry. =]

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    Quote from loriangel14
    You need to grow a thick skin.If you are going to analyze things such as saying hi and bye you are going to be very unhappy.You can't take everything personally.Gossip? get used to it.There is always some.Just do your job and ignore the rest.Nurse managers are not teachers on the play ground and you can't run to them whining that the other kids aren't playing nice.
    Thank you for your honest opinions. I think these are some emotional issues that I have to learn to overcome for future encounter.

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    Quote from mazy
    I think that you went into this with the wrong expectations. It's not the job of the preceptor to offer you a lot of support, guidance and patience when it comes to you working with patients.

    The preceptor's job is to help you learn, but the patient always takes priority over your needs.

    Your job is to learn how to do patient care without demanding extra attention from your preceptor that will pull her away from her patient responsibilities.

    Having you follow up on the IV issue with pharmacy was a good example of them trying to take advantage of a "teachable moment" and I think they did great in taking the time to do that.

    It was something you needed to learn that will serve you well in the future; I can't imagine why you would be upset about that.

    A lot of people might have just rolled their eyes at your ineptness, done it themselves, and given up on you.

    If the nurse isn't paying attention to your reports, perhaps she is frustrated with the way you are giving report.

    I can understand crying in frustration but the fact that tattled on them for being mean to you is astounding. And now you want to go even further up the chain of command?

    This is not an example of "nurses eating their young," whatever that means.

    You need to adjust your expectations or you will continue to be frustrated in you job.

    Hi, I appreciate your comment. You might have misread some of the content in this entry. She was my former preceptor, and at the moment of incident she was a nurse who took the reports from me. As a former preceptor, and under the circumstance that she knew how to handle the IV bag, instead of showing me the correct way (we never encounter this IV bag issue during our preceptor-ship, so I wouldn't know how to correct myself), she walked away from me. Left me hanging.

    I was upset because I felt I didn't get the support that I wanted from those senior nurses. As a new grad, working my very first job, and being thrown into a very unfamiliar working environment, the last request that I ask of her is to be supportive and not making me feel incompetent about myself.

    Of course, I have to improve my own emotional control over things as such. After careful consideration, it is no one to be blamed but my lack of experience of the real world and people in general. There's always so much to learn on every day basis.

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    not.done.yet and MassED like this.

    Thank you for your honest opinions. I think these are some emotional issues that I have to learn to overcome for future encounter.

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    Hi, I appreciate your comment. You might have misread some of the content in this entry. She was my former preceptor, and at the moment of incident she was a nurse who took the reports from me. As a former preceptor, and under the circumstance that she knew how to handle the IV bag, instead of showing me the correct way (we never encounter this IV bag issue during our preceptor-ship, so I wouldn't know how to correct myself), she walked away from me. Left me hanging.

    I was upset because I felt I didn't get the support that I wanted from those senior nurses. As a new grad, working my very first job, and being thrown into a very unfamiliar working environment, the last request that I ask of her is to be supportive and not making me feel incompetent about myself.

    Of course, I have to improve my own emotional control over things as such. After careful consideration, it is no one to be blamed but my lack of experience of the real world and people in general. There's always so much to learn on every day basis.

  • 5
    Juniper248, hope3456, Joe V, and 2 others like this.

    Dear readers,

    I'm a new grad, and have been working as a new nurse for early 5 months. I've heard a lot regarding "nurses eat their young" before I stepped a foot into this profession, however, I didn't quite comprehend the significant meaning behind it until I have personally experienced it at my work place.

    She's one of my preceptors when I initially started working there. As a new grad, I anticipated a lot of support, a hand of guidance, and patience, however, after a period of time spending with her, sadly to say, she had successfully made my life miserable, and made me feel extremely unwelcome. At a point I even contemplated whether this is what nursing is about. I lost my eager passion for nursing. Initially, I would greet her with a hi and bye whenever I see, and her reaction to my greetings were very indifferent and sometimes she would just look at me and turned away. Ultimately, It made me feel very embarrassed in front of everyone, several times, I thought to myself, why am I so persistent with her? why am I so desperate to get her approval? Why am I let her put me down again, and again? For what?

    So yesterday was the climax of this bullying business, or perhaps, put an end to my misery. First, I walked in on her gossiping about me with another co-worker in the nursing station. At that moment, I just looked at them both in disbelief. Secondly, what really ignited my untold emotions was with a patient's IV antibiotic. Another co-worker, let's name her B, whom I gave report to, also a close friend to hers, and her (A) were discussing that she discovered that there's very fluid backed up, about 5ml, in a 3g Unasyn bottle which was attached to the 100ml 0.9% sodium Chloride. Be mindful, I gave all my reports already, had to stay to hang another bag because another co-worker (C) was complaining that I should have done that during my shift, of course, I willingly agreed to change the IV bag. It was close to 8am in the morning, I was preparing to head back to the locker room, when I heard my name, I looked up it was nurse A calling for me to go to nurse B. They knew exactly what to do with the bag, but had me call the Pharmacy and bring it down to the Pharmacy department to have them show me how.

    On my way down, I was so upset, tears were inevitably rolling down my cheeks. My nursing educator saw me. She told me that she heard a calling from God and saw me standing in a corner crying. I thank God that she saw me. After hearing what had happened, she furiously took me upstairs and called in each person for confrontation. My manager was there at the time of event. My former preceptor, nurse A, admitted that she was closed off to me, and it all started when she first precepted and perceived my attitude and action as not receptive to her teachings. I stood there shaking my head while listening to her complains. So my manager inquired when all of this was going on, how come as a senior nurse, especially a preceptor, she didn't express it to her when they had meetings together. In addition, she fabricated more lies about me not giving her full reports in the morning. I voiced myself and said it loud and clear in front of everyone that every time we sat down to give her reports, she's either not listening attentively and in the middle of giving reports, she would turn away to start conversing with another nurse, or snatching reports from my hand and telling me she knows the patient and need no more reports from me.

    I've been thinking a lot. I don't know if I can still work on that unit anymore. I don't know if I should transfer to another unit, or apply to another hospital. I know distinctively that these nasty people are everywhere, but especially, since the confrontation and mediation took place, I'm not anticipating my work life to be any more easier or comfortable on that unit. Words will spread like feathers throughout the whole unit. I don't know how people will view me after this incident. Perhaps, using higher authority to report the "bullies"?

    I feel lonelier than ever. It makes me dread going to work everyday. Please help!

    Sincerely,
    Your desperate fellow nurse

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    Quote from Rodoon
    LuLu,

    I wasn't being snarky and I'm sorry if I offended. I don't understand why you think you've only got 2-3 days to mail one. Brides and new grads think they have over two months (for an example).

    Personally, I felt if you hand delivered the Thank-you note and the NM hasn't hired you or completed the job interviews then it would be akward. That's why I suggested taking it to the hospital mail room and asking them to put it in her box. Also, I hired RN's for over six years and my decision never once hinged on a Thank-you note.
    I think I will take your advice and take it to the hospital's mailroom to avoid any unwanted awkwardness. Thank you =]

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    Quote from SweetseRN
    I don't think 2-3 days is that long at all. Send a real, heartfelt note out in the mail today or through the hospital mail room if at all possible. A lot of people totally forget or just don't even realize that a thank you note is a really nice thing to do, so the fact that you are even sending one likely puts you leaps and bounds ahead of many other people. I am a HUGE fan of the thank you note, but a few days delay will not tarnish the sentiment of what you are doing. Good luck on the new job!
    Thank you! I think I'm going to deliver it in person and make sure that she gets it. =]


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