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Palliative Care, DNP 14,169 Views

Joined Jun 28, '11 - from 'Virginia'. Palliative Care, DNP is a DNP, FNP. She has 'Since 2009' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Family Nurse Practitioner'. Posts: 762 (56% Liked) Likes: 1,890

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  • Oct 16

    I am about two years into bedside nursing. I work twelve hour shifts. And I bust my a** during every single shift. I get home sweaty, hungry, exhausted, etc. This is unfortunately not something I want to do for the next 38 years, even though I love interacting and taking care of patients when they are so sick. It is just too much. But right now, I need my skills. I am learning how to become a good nurse. I applaud those who have done bedside nursing for their entire careers! I don't know where I will end up....more school, or an office job...but I don't see myself being a bedside nurse when I am 58 years old.

  • Oct 14

    In my experience, nursing in the '80s was about the same as it is now, only the workload was less demanding. Yes, nurses questioned orders if they felt that was necessary. We advocated for clients. We were probably respected more by colleagues and families than we are now.

  • Oct 14

    As someone who has worked in OB/Women's Health my entire career, I am in favor of men working in OB if that's where their passion lies. Women choose male OB physicians all the time, there's no reason why a male couldn't work successfully as an OB nurse.

    If a male nurse applied to my department because that's the area of nursing where he feels most interested/passionate, then I would have no issue hiring him.

  • Oct 14

    Other than the fact you will be a RN and not an OB physician, what's the difference? Two of the best OB nurses I ever knew were men. Go for it and the best of luck!

  • Oct 12

    I'm a Direct Entry graduate who worked for many years in a non-nursing health care profession before I went back to school. I have not worked bedside as a RN. I graduated 8 years ago and had no trouble finding a job at that time...No one cared about my lack of RN experience; employers were more concerned about my lack of NP experience. I don't think not having bedside RN experience has hindered me at all. I use very little of what I learned in the RN portion of my program.

    If you choose to go this route, select a reputable school with a competitive program. You don't want to go to a school that has low admission standards. Be willing to go over and above the minimum clinical requirements, as the more clinical time you can get, the better. Sadly, also be prepared to hear a lot of negativity from nurses who cannot see how DE grads can be successful NPs. Work hard, do your absolute best, and let your performance speak for itself.

  • Oct 12

    Quote from Wuzzie
    What I think is the absolute truth here is that a large percentage of nurses are satisfied with fulfilling minimal ce requirements to keep their license and nothing more. It does not mean they aren't capable of learning. They, for whatever reason, do not see advancing their education as necessary and that is truly sad. Maybe I am an outlier but the fact that I was able to learn and apply, in depth, the exact same research principles that my BSN colleagues had as part of their coursework is enough proof for me that a BSN is absolutely not necessary to practice on the same level. The onus was on me to take responsibility for my own continuing education.
    I wholeheartedly agree, and in essence, this is the reason behind the BSN push (along with the almighty $$$). Outliers take it upon themselves to be lifetime learners, the rest, do what is required of them and not much more.

    Again, you are misrepresenting the statistics: BSN is not absolutely necessary but it is relatively necessary. You made that argument yourself.

  • Oct 12

    Quote from MunoRN
    This is why ASN to BSN programs do not include any sort of remedial content, they are better described as post-Bac programs where the bachelor's is granted at the end of the post-Bac program.
    Ok that's understandable, but if the curriculum is the same then what credits/courses are taken? And how is it a post-bac program if there was no bac?


    Quote from MunoRN
    But as someone who's job includes implementing evidence into practice I can say that this (formerly) additional 3-5 credits taken by BSNs don't reliably translate into a better understanding of utilization of research.
    It might not be sufficient, but that's an argument for more not less isn't it? Do you feel that nurses are better off without any?

  • Oct 12

    Quote from MurseJJ
    Do you need a degree to be able to understand apply...anything?
    No but you need the coursework and the experience!

  • Oct 12

    There was a lot of what I considered BS and busywork in my BSN curriculum, but I never considered getting anything other than a bachelor's degree. I was the only BSN in the hospital in which I first worked, and my manager was a diploma nurse. Later on, I worked in a surgeon's clinic, and was the only BSN in the office. The surgeon and I had a conversation about our experiences in education, and he said he could tell a difference in the way I practiced in comparison to my co-workers. I don't know. School was quite a long time ago for me, but I do remember being very frustrated by the lack of real world nursing to which I was exposed. My first job was a complete shock and I felt completely unprepared.

  • Oct 12

    I am a nurse at a major hospital where I have worked over a year after gaining my ASN. I have returned to get my BSN. What I'm not understanding is why there is such an ENORMOUS disconnect between what I do at work and the class work I need to do. It doesn'y apply at all. I have to take family care classes and informatics with very little practical application. I have to memorize all the rules of APA. My patients don't care if I can wrote a wonderful APA formatted paper. They just don't. It's like there is no appreciation in BSN education for what nursing is really about. At no time will I EVER do a CFIM on my patient or a PEEK readiness assessment. Get real. Where is the disconnect? Everyone I talk to say's the same thing about their BSN program, that it is completely useless. Who decided that nurses needed extensive training in social work and paper formatting?!?! I don't deal with social work. I have a team of social workers for that. At no time will I ever be in a patients home trying to improve the communication between family members ect. There are family counselors ect for that. It isn't my job! Yet here I am getting trained in areas I have no interest in, and will never ever use in my career. And for what? So I can say I have 3 letters behind my name and the school and hospital can make more money? Its a joke. I'm learning nothing of value. I would drop out and find a new school, but everyone I talk to has the same opinion about where ever they went. Basically healthcare has become obsessed with accolades, but forgot that those accolades were supposed to represent a level of expertise.

    Why is there such an enormous disconnect between real life nursing and nursing education??!?!?

  • Oct 12

    Quote from Mini2544
    There is plenty of opportunity in this country for everyone.
    Would that this were true. Unfortunately, the steady increase in income inequality over the last several decades in this country demonstrates that it isn't.

  • Oct 12

    Seattle area here, living in the world of the $15 minimum wage. I make about 60% more than my previous job in another state. Jobs are definitely not scarce here which I feel shows that argument does not fly. My electric bill? $17. Food? Same cost. Gas? About $3/gallon. The housing is more expensive but not due to gouging. The demand is so high and the supply low because they can't build fast enough and there is one housing unit for every 3 jobs available. 85,000 people didn't move here last year because it sucks here. Transit is awesome. Crime not bad. Climate wonderful. Not enough people to fill all of the jobs of any type. Much happier workers in general.

  • Oct 12

    I would love to read research studies about the dangers of raising minimum wage.

  • Oct 12

    Here is the thing about the economy when the minimum wage increases.....If people make more money, they SPEND MORE MONEY! So all those fast food places and ice cream shops have MORE business, therefore make more money.
    Productivity and profits have increased exponentially over the last 30 years but the minimum wage has laid stagnant. All the money that should have been going toward raises has gone to the owners, making them richer and richer. Want someone to be angry at, be angry at the owners of corporations, not the people doing the hard work every day. They deserve a living wage.

  • Oct 12

    Quote from TriathleteRN
    Mini2544 Sounds like you are just fine with the massive inequality and division that continues to grow. It's ok for the 1% to continue to get richer while the poorer get poorer and the middle class disappears? This is really working out right now.
    Usually the people throwing around terms like "socialism" and "communism" actually have very little knowledge about what either actually are. These are usually the same people who bleat about "welfare queens", "trickle down economics", "Obama phones" and "hand-outs", with nothing but the most superficial notion of the reality of economics, poverty, segregation, institutionalized and structural racism etc., which belies their claims to be interested in investing in schemes to "help people better themselves." Let's start by getting everyone on an equal playing field and ensuring a living wage. All the doomsday predications about cities which have already instituted the $15 min. wage have been proven false.


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