Content That Palliative Care, DNP Likes

Palliative Care, DNP, DNP 11,282 Views

Joined Jun 28, '11 - from 'Virginia'. Palliative Care, DNP is a DNP, FNP. She has 'Since 2009' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Family Nurse Practitioner'. Posts: 682 (53% Liked) Likes: 1,597

Sorted By Last Like Given (Max 500)
  • Dec 2

    I am in my last year of nursing school, so not a nurse quite yet, but... No. I do not feel "called" to be a nurse. My ultimate goal is to be a stay at home mother, and to homeschool our future children. But the world operates via money, and my husband is going to be in graduate school for chemistry for the next six or so years. I need to have the capability to earn money to save for a house down payment. To be honest? If I were actually looking at a lifelong career, I would have pursued something other than nursing.

    All that said: I intend to be the best nurse I can possibly be. I am a hardworking, compassionate person, and my patients will receive quality care. You don't have to be called or inspired to be a good nurse. You don't have to go home each night and let your heart break over your patients. My life outside of nursing is such a bigger part of me - nursing is a job. It can be a challenging and rewarding job, but it is just a job. But I can guarantee to you that when I am in a patient's room, they will receive my respect, my kindness, and my quality medical care - and I can provide those without feeling noble or inspired or called.

  • Nov 29

    Did the IRB approve this method of data collection? How can you validate respondents?

  • Nov 29

    Uh........sorry?

    Since you have so much free time, maybe you can use it to identify things to do that can improve your work environment? If you've already identified those things and still have free time remaining, I guess all I can say is, either find a different job after your golden 1 year of experience is in or work on your side gigs while you're there.

    Signed,
    A New Grad Who is Absolutely Getting Her Butt Kicked in Acute Care on a Regular Basis

  • Nov 29

    You probably will feel under appreciated a lot of the time, unfortunately.

    I have witnessed RNs at my facility who wouldn't answer a call light if the patient's room was on fire and they were holding the hose. Our CNAs work their butts off (and they are awesome!) and our floor is pretty good at remembering that CNAs are there to assist the RN with the RNs patients. Ultimately they are OUR patients. It bugs the crap out of me when nurses pawn stuff off on CNAs---and I mean when the nurse is not otherwise occupied by charting or patient care.

    We we had a nurse a while back who would bark orders at the CNAs. I said something to the nurse, it was driving me crazy. I believe in a very simbiotic relationship with the CNAs...they can make our jobs easier or they can make them very, very difficult. Many of our CNAs are also in nursing school and will be working in that capacity in a few years...how welcoming to a new position if you've been crapped on for the years you worked as a CNA

    Bottom line is be the kind of employee that you'd want to work with. Appreciated or not, do your thing and do it well. At the end of your shift you can leave those people there and thank the universe that you don't have to live with them

    Good luck to you!!

  • Nov 29

    OP, when I use my phone at work, it's because I'm looking up a medication. Don't assume.

  • Nov 29

    Welcome to being an aide.

    Edit: for clarification. All these things that people are asking you to do are your job.

  • Nov 29

    So, your saying all the nurses do is sit there and play on their phones, while you run around doing everything? Who's assessing, passing meds, getting lab results, calling report, and discharging? Oh and let's not forget the massive amount of charting that has to be done on each patient.

    Yes, you are a paramedic, which applies outside the hospital walls. When you are employed inside the hospital walls, you re a tech. That is your scope of practice, which includes all of the job duties you just described.

    You are new. You are already complaining. I think you need to look at things from another perspective. I just think you don't understand what all a nurse does.

  • Nov 29

    You may be a paramedic, but your position in the hospital is defined by your hiring job description.
    You have 12 weeks experience in the hospital ... way too soon to judge the actions of professional nurses.

    Keep your head down, watch and learn, pay your dues.. and earn respect as a CNA/paramedic.

  • Nov 29

    Quote from dspkfm
    Hard to believe you can call yourself an atheist and still be a nurse.
    Are you ******** me? *Looks around for candid cameras*. I guess god never got that memo because I've been getting away with this mortal sin for 25 years now. Relgion is not the only way and I feel far healthier without religion in my life. As soon as god pays my paycheck maybe I'll reconsider.

  • Nov 29

    Quote from dspkfm
    Hard to believe you can call yourself an atheist and still be a nurse.
    Believe it, because we exist. Your beliefs are your own but please don't discredit us for not subscribing to them. Kindness, compassion, love, living in the service of others... all values I hold dear that are not mutually exclusive to belief in a deity.

  • Nov 26

    My bank account was the one calling out for it. I do like helping people, always wanted to be a medic, saw the ridiculous pay they don't get and went into nursing instead.

  • Nov 26

    Quote from dspkfm
    Hard to believe you can call yourself an atheist and still be a nurse. I have been a nurse for 33 years and witnessed beyond a doubt there is a God in heaven who created the living and the dying. I vowed to be a nurse at age 16 when my boyfriend's father died of cancer of the brain. I never like nursing for a long time due to the physician's who abused nurses in those early years of long ago. But I found my place and now am sorry that I do not have another 33 years to give to nursing. I love it and it has become a part of me. I want to give everyday to others because of what God has allowed me to be given. Yes, nursing has allowed me to see much and I am grateful. DSPKFM
    I'm not sure what flavor of religious you are, but it is perfectly reasonable to call yourself and atheist and still be a nurse. Not everyone sees the same thing as you do. When you see "God", other people see other things, and their viewpoints are just as valid as your own religious viewpoint.

  • Nov 26

    Quote from AliNajaCat
    Can you tell it's only Tuesday and it's been a long damm week already? Calling? Not so much. I liked science and I liked physiology and I liked the adrenalin rush of critical care for 20 years. Now, with other priorities I mostly like the exorbitant pay I get for using my brains rather than my back and feet, and the ability to take a day off whenever I want to (or can, since I have my own business). Couldn't do it if I hadn't gone to college and grad school for nursing, but I have no illusions of being "called." Call me anything but late for dinner.
    A- to the effing -men.

  • Nov 26

    OMG, has this one come round again? Save some time and go to this link and check out the MANY threads that have beat this horse to death many times over. It's a job, it's a holy calling, whatEVS. As with immunizations and abortion, lots of heat but little light, and nobody's opinion changes.

    http://allnurses.com/gsearch.php?cx=...g+a+calling%3F

    Can you tell it's only Tuesday and it's been a long damm week already? Calling? Not so much. I liked science and I liked physiology and I liked the adrenalin rush of critical care for 20 years. Now, with other priorities I mostly like the exorbitant pay I get for using my brains rather than my back and feet, and the ability to take a day off whenever I want to (or can, since I have my own business). Couldn't do it if I hadn't gone to college and grad school for nursing, but I have no illusions of being "called." Call me anything but late for dinner.

  • Nov 26

    I was kinda ,sorta called. When I was 20 years old, my son was diagnosed with a one in a million blood disorder. The doctors told me he was going to die. I researched the disease and got interested in medicine. Ended up in nursing.

    35 years later, I would NOT do it again.. nursing sucks.


close