Content That Mom To 4, DNP-FNP Likes

Content That Mom To 4, DNP-FNP Likes

Mom To 4, DNP-FNP, DNP 9,690 Views

Joined Jun 28, '11 - from 'Virginia'. Mom To 4, DNP-FNP is a DNP, FNP. She has 'Since 2009' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Family Nurse Practitioner'. Posts: 650 (52% Liked) Likes: 1,488

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  • Jul 21

    Quote from Jensmom7
    I have a hard enough time dealing when people at work find out I'm diabetic, I can't imagine divulging a psych diagnosis and being under that particular microscope.
    I know. I can only imagine what would happen if I disclosed to a "friend" at work about my psych diagnosis. Yikes!

  • Jul 21

    Quote from OrganizedChaos
    That's just crazy to me. I would never talk to my coworkers about my mental health diagnosis or share meds & for the same reason you explained. You might be friend(ly) now, but what happens if you piss a coworker off? I'll pass!
    I have a hard enough time dealing when people at work find out I'm diabetic, I can't imagine divulging a psych diagnosis and being under that particular microscope.

  • Jul 21

    I have learned that while palliative care is an immense privlidge and very rewarding, sometimes it really sucks having to tell a family member that death is imminent when they have been obviously thinking that their loved one would continue on

  • Jul 21

    I learned that sometimes GoFundMe is necessary. It's the only way I'll be able to pay for my husband's funeral expenses. I never knew arrangements were so costly! We both are on Social Security so no resources to speak of, and of course the funeral home wants all their money upfront. Ouch.

    I learned that hospice facilities are a Godsend when a patient's pain is out of control and nothing you give them even touches it. I'm so glad we got him there in time for him to get some pain and agitation relief. His nurse and CNA were top-notch and I'm so grateful that he was able to die peacefully. God bless hospice nurses!

  • Jul 21

    Hello,
    i am a 22 year old female who has been suffering from stomach issues since I was 15. I have seen many doctors, been told I've had IBS, lactose intolerance, constipation, and so on. Two weeks ago I finally got my pc to refere me to a surgeon. I met with him once and finally I've been listened too...

    I just recently had my gallbladder and appendix removed on Friday July 15th. I had a hida scan done a week before surgery that revealed I had a sluggish gallbladder.
    The appendix were taken out because I have had numerous trips to the ED with lower right abdominal pain.
    I got my results from my surgery today and come to find out I was also suffering from appendicitis. No elevated white blood cells, no fever, no vomiting, and a negative CT.

    I also was informed that i had gallstones.( which did not show up on the hida scan)

    if you're suffering, and you believe something is not right fight for yourself. You're your only advocate. You're not crazy.
    -chels

  • Jul 18

    I don't know details on how exactly those unarmed guards subdued the shooter, but holy smokes what stones on those folks! Those guards wouldn't be paying for their own lunches for the rest of the year(at a minimum) if I worked on that unit.

  • Jul 18

    Quote from lexylooRN
    I had a patient say she was having a diabetic attack. I brought in the glucometer and explained that I needed to take her blood sugar. She wouldn't give me her finger and I explained that I needed to do a finger stick to check her blood sugar because she felt like she was having a diabetic attack. She said she doesn't have blood sugar problems, she said I need to check her diabetes. Oh you have diabetes but not blood sugar problems? Makes perfect sense.
    - do you have diabetes?
    - no
    - ok, I see you take metformin, gliburide, Invocana and Januvia. Do you know why do you take them?
    - my doc said these are for my sugar.
    - well, "sugar" or "sugar problem" means that you have diabetes.
    - WHAT??? I DO NOT have diabetes, I JUST have SUGAR! Nobody ever told me I have diabetes!

  • Jul 18

    The grandiose lies some patients' family members tell me make me want to say, "Doubt it!". I had one "medical doctor" ask me what I was giving his mother. When I told him it was penicillin, he asked me if that was for pain.

  • Jul 18

    I had a patient say she was having a diabetic attack. I brought in the glucometer and explained that I needed to take her blood sugar. She wouldn't give me her finger and I explained that I needed to do a finger stick to check her blood sugar because she felt like she was having a diabetic attack. She said she doesn't have blood sugar problems, she said I need to check her diabetes. Oh you have diabetes but not blood sugar problems? Makes perfect sense.

  • Jul 18

    Borderline diabetic. You are or you aren't. Taking insulin? Pretty sure you are

  • Jul 17

    I am in the Dallas/Fort Worth area of Texas. For the sake of simplicity, I will simply mention the most recent incident.

    During the holiday season of 2014, a patient called me a black ___ (the female dog word that rhymes with 'witch' and starts with 'B') and told me to "go back to Africa." I informed him I was born and raised in the US, as were the preceding six generations of my family.

    I proceeded to end the conversation and turned his care over to another nurse who was the same race as him. Even though he did not request another nurse, I refused to be verbally abused by someone who does not want me there.

    There's no protocol for these occurrences. Although these instances sting your psyche, you must maintain your composure and not engage the patient. In addition, document as if your life depended on it. These types of patients have the tendency to lie and/or undermine what really happened.

  • Jul 17

    I was working in Austin as a travel nurse, night shift. A patient called me and the tech the "n" word. It was the night shift so the patient really had no other choice but us to take care of her. I did not tell the house supervisor because she didn't state that she wanted another nurse. So, the tech and I just went on about our business. We kept her clean and turned during our shift.

    Yes, it did bother me but it wasn't the first time I've been called a "n". At the current hospital that I work at, I really don't believe that there's a protocol for patients who racially prefer their own to care for them. If that's the case then they need to hire thier own private nurse. The environment at my job is very mutli-racial and multi-ethnic. If a patient refused someone of another race or gender, they would not have anyone to care for them. We have good mix of men, women, and every racial group on the face of the earth.

  • Jul 17

    You stated you had trouble staying awake during NOC shifts. Did anything happen that would make them question your practices. I'm not talking about giving meds late, I'm talking being so drowsy you can't see straight.

  • Jul 13

    N

    Quote from renaia
    Reading things like this cause me dissonance. I'm entering nursing school for my ADN as a 2nd career now that my daughter is almost old enough to attend school. I have a BS in an unrelated field (psych) and am still paying the loans off from my Undergrad.

    I COULD do a 1 year accelerated BSN for 26k OR I could get my ADN for less than 1/4 of that.

    I made a post and was basically told that unless I get a BSN I won't be able to get work. I am unsure if this is realistically the case or if there is just a kind-of looking-down-your-nose on ADNs.

    At the end of the day I HOPE I can get work with an ADN and can do a rn to BSN after I am more established and if I had 26k to throw around I would most definitely go the BSN route, but as it stands, I have a family and we just can't afford that right now.

    Is it truly the case that ADNs are not employable???
    People have already pointed out that the answer to your question changes drastically from area to area.

    I will go a step further and say it's also personal, not just geographical. In other words, two people. ........graduates of the same school, live in the same area and likewise similar in every other way that matters...............will have completely different experiences. That's what I've observed anyway.

    The variables that make their experiences so different often are personal and private. Hence, when faced with a question such as yours, that information remains undisclosed. So it is folly for us to take anyone's opinion of the job market too seriously. Its a personal experience.

    A good example: Knew an ADN nurse who constantly insisted you needed a BSN for hospitals to even bother to interview you. I knew this not to be the case and in fact tried to inform her this assumption was incorrect. My assertions that you could be hired with an ADN were met with bitterness though so I gave up. The truth was (I found out later from her) that she had filed multiple times for workmans comp. She never received benefits though which made me wonder if she hadn't earned a reputation for being and injury faker. Add to the mix the fact that her license had in the past been put on hold (something to do with her mother turning her in for child abuse) and..........you can see why she had problems getting interviews.

    Imagine this girl as a AN member now, posting an answer to your question. She isn't going to tell you all that. She'll just give you her standard answer that she told me: "Oh boo hoo, no interviews for me and its all because I only have an ADN."

    Another example: A guy I knew from school contacted me and said he was out of nursing. This was only three years after graduation. He too believed he was not being hired for jobs because he had an ADN, not a BSN. Truth was: He was telling his interviewers he could not work any shift other than daylight, and he could not work holidays. He figured they should be Ok with that since he had his kids on most holidays.

    Can you imagine having used his opinion (that he was not being hired only because he lacked a BSN) as a key to deciding what was best for you?

    Our encounters with the job market are personal experiences. My advice would be to determine what is best for you from what YOU see for yourself, do the best you can with what you have and move forward. If you are truly applying yourself to what you do, you have a better chance of having a positive experience yourself.

    Its good to take advice from others and to hear other opinions but...........different people with different agendas have different experiences. Not to mention not everyone is honest too.

  • Jul 12

    My A1C on routine labs: 18%-Lab error. Shocked, alive and not diabetic 10 years later. Go figure


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