Content That Mom To 4, DNP-FNP Likes

Content That Mom To 4, DNP-FNP Likes

Mom To 4, DNP-FNP, DNP 10,536 Views

Joined Jun 28, '11 - from 'Virginia'. Mom To 4, DNP-FNP is a DNP, FNP. She has 'Since 2009' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Family Nurse Practitioner'. Posts: 669 (52% Liked) Likes: 1,548

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  • Sep 27

    You found a serious error. It is not your job to judge if it was an innocent error or not! I would have serious concerns about a manager that wasn't very interested in the error you brought forward. A narcotic is missing, a highly abuse narcotic, and a patient was without pain medication for 3 days.

  • Sep 26

    Many employers will not consider your experience as a new grad until you have worked at the same facility/ unit for one year.

    You can start applying for other positions now (not advisable), but you're a new grad with no experience. Stay and learn where you are.

  • Sep 26

    It depends. Some LTCs are notorious for their attrition rates in my area. And as such they will happily take on new grads. I think terming it "taking a chance on a new grad" is being generous. "Exploitation" might be more apt. I wouldn't hesitate to walk away from one of these places and not even put it on my resume.

  • Sep 26

    Well, you could start applying for other jobs. However, if I were looking a pile of resumes, I would pass right by yours and look at other applicants. If you have been at a job less than six months and you are ready to move on, how do I know you won't do the same thing to me? Most people do not start out in their dream job. Most people have to put some time in getting experience before they get a more desirable position.

  • Sep 26

    If i've ever met somebody who won't be satisfied with their role as an NP it would probably be the OP. You really just need to go to med school. I mean.... all your posts seem to be an ill-attempt to induce personal parity in your mind in regards to nurse practitioners and physicians.
    Actually, you probably shouldn't go to med school, you seem to be more focused on what you can call yourself/tell people what you do, and other related ego issues than providing patient care and improving the profession.


    chill out and enjoy the ride.

  • Sep 26

    There's nothing to gain either politically or economically by being managed by the medical board. In fact, there's only much to be lost.

    Here's the rub as I see it. My state's nursing board is comprised of LPNs, RNs, and APRNs. Now, tell me why I am under the jurisdiction of LPNs and RNs. I guess it indeed rolls up hill here.

  • Sep 26

    NPs do not practice medicine. They do not attend medical school. They attend nursing school. The scope of practice is different. Furthermore, if you'd "Like to be able to tell people I practice medicine" then you need to go to medical school first. Because you practice nursing.

  • Sep 26

    Advanced practice nursing is not the same as practicing medicine. The education and the background are completely different. When physicians fear APRN (or ARNP if you will) encroaching upon "their" territory, they over-lobby against some of our attempts at gaining authority over our practice, for which we were trained.

    Barriers to practicing to the extent of our training devalues our worth but this is a battle currently being fought.

    I, for one, am merely hoping to perform as I've been trained to do and provide patient care as an APRN. In no way am I attempting to be a physician. No, thank you.

  • Sep 26

    Nurse practitioners were originally governed by both the state BON and medical board, and nursing fought tooth and nail for years to get NPs out from under the authority of the state medical boards in most states. Nurse practitioners are practicing nursing, and their practice should be governed and regulated by the state nursing boards, not by physicians. If/when you become a nurse practitioner, you will be practicing nursing, regardless of what you would prefer to call it (and regardless of what it looks like to the general public). If you'd like to be able to tell people you are practicing medicine, go to medical school and get licensed as a physician.

    FWIW, all the states in which NPs have independent practice are states in which they are regulated exclusively by the BON. The (few) remaining states in which NPs are regulated by the medical board as well as the BON have limited practice for NPs (although to be fair, there are plenty of states in which NPs are regulated exclusively by the BON which also place restrictions on NP practice). The more say physicians have about NP practice, the less autonomy and more restricted practice NPs are going to have.

  • Sep 26

    I've decided what I hate about these threads is not only the prejudices but also the justification. Neither should happen.

    We're not talking about fit powerhouses, we're talking about indisputable high risk obesity (True the thread title is misleading but these threads are always end about weight that affects mobility, endurance and risk metabolic syndrome).

    My obese coworkers are visibly and significantly impacted by their weight. Walking across the office is labored and/or painful. Every single one eats in a way that is obviously a major contributing factor (i.e. large portions Chinese take out is a regular around the office). The working conditions are not the cause.

    We should neither be justifying nor criticizing. The truth is, it's complicated and everyone is on their own journey doing the best they are able for whatever reasons that are not ours to judge. (On the flip side, this also means we shouldn't be judging Joe Public and the way they feed and manage their over weight sedentary kids, which if everyone is honest is a very hard thing to resist).

    For the critical out there, learn about insulin resistance and look to our general understanding and attitudes towards public health and the current recommended high carb diets.

    Leave the individuals in peace and regard them with respect and care.

  • Sep 26

    There are reasons for one to be overweight few of which are really legitimate. Given the current overly high BMI demographic of our population, the biggest problem we really have is a lack of discipline to maintain a healthy life style, regardless of vocational discipline.
    Having said that, consider counseling a pt on the risks of smoking when the nurse reeks of tobacco smoke from the break (s)he just returned from. Or remarking "... looks like we are gaining weight..." to that pt just weighed by a very obese nurse. (This happened to a friend of mine and he gave little credibility to the nurse for anything she said after that.)
    I have not counseled any pt to do anything re health maintenance that that I wasn't already doing or would do.
    Warning, harsh comment follows: For those of you who are overweight, smoke (really? despite watching pts die as a result of smoking, you still do?!?), get over it, straighten up, and stop making excuses.

  • Sep 26

    Quote from Ruby Vee
    And for those of us who cannot run due to joint issues or injuries that are unrelated to our weight?

    Self righteous much?
    Are u SERIOUS??? GO SWIMMING! Plenty of people with joint issues exercise. Being sedentary is NOT healthy. And it's not being self righteous. The point is that playing the whole I'm too busy card doesn't cut it. You get ONE BODY. Take care of it.
    Also, ever heard of paralympics? Again, people overcome a lot of obstacles to be active.

  • Sep 26

    With our societal obesity epidemic it's not a nurses' working conditions issue. The conditions can be blamed as the primary cause all day long but that's not the cause, nor the fix. I've got the same statistics in my office where breaks, getting up and moving and good food are encouraged and supported in a safe sunny semi rural part of whole food abundant California. Some choose it and some 2/3'rds don't.

    And when are inpatient nurses doing all of this weight loss education? They're coming home to us still sick and marginally stable so I can't imagine there's time to have those kinds of discussions. (In fact they might want to take a break instead of weight loss education, if this futile patient education is even happening) Why is that even part of this "hypocrisy" discussion? I'd bet the farm this is an asesthetic issue, and not brought about by obese patients who don't want to hear their nurses tell them how to lose weight.

    If I were going to admit to judgementalism though, and I will, it would have to be towards our local morbidly obese pediatrician. I would choose not to bring my kids to this provider for their well checks. I don't care if that makes me horrid, I just couldn't do it for the risk of the influence someone in that position could have on my kids. Just like I wouldn't want their teachers/coaches/childcare providers smoking in front of them, I wouldn't want their first healthcare provider to be morbidly obese during their most impressionable years. I don't think that makes me a fatist but if it truly does, I'll have to own it.

  • Sep 26

    Why are we hiding behind the fact that we sometimes do not get lunch breaks, and that we have to pick at grub we can find to eat at midnight? Seriously, Nursing is not the only profession where people work through their lunch breaks, so please just stop that nonsense. This is not the only stressful job out there people. I know, I get it, nursing requires us to be super humans, but when you are out of work just about every year because you have to do knee and hip surgery because your little joints can not handle the 400lbs you're carry around; clearly that is your body telling you that it's just too much! Yes, one being obese does not mean that you are not capable, experienced, and possibly knows as much as any MD; but that advanced knowledge may not be what is needed when a code is called when you can not move fast enough to help save the patients that needs our help. I get it hypothyroidism, menopause are a few things that can affect your weight, but what about those that do not have any of those health concerns? I know I couldn't sleep at night if I knew my obesity prevented me from effectively doing my job, and a patient died because of that; could you?

  • Sep 26

    Just as smoking was discouraged forhealthcare personnel, so is obesity. I don'think these referenced slightly overweight individuals. While our job does not lend itself to healthy eatingand exercise, I have heard patients verbalize tha they don't believe a "fatassed" nurse telling them to change their eating habits. There is validity on both sidesof the argument


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