Content That Mom To 4, DNP-FNP Likes

Content That Mom To 4, DNP-FNP Likes

Mom To 4, DNP-FNP, DNP 10,057 Views

Joined Jun 28, '11 - from 'Virginia'. Mom To 4, DNP-FNP is a DNP, FNP. She has 'Since 2009' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Family Nurse Practitioner'. Posts: 652 (52% Liked) Likes: 1,497

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  • Aug 29

    I was hoping the thefts were limited to sauces and salad dressings. But I saw first-hand where a nurse went down to the cafeteria and purchased some chocolate chip cookies and placed them in the fridge. Another staff member came in shortly after she left, went to the fridge just to look around (as you would at home), found the cookies and made the statement, "oh well, this has no name on it and I don't have time to go downstairs". The problem is, or one of them, is that staff often have shift 'dinners' or parties and stash the food in the fridge for whoever wants to partake in it after the party is over. So, some of them become accustomed to it being ok to take whatever they want because of the frequency of these random dinners.

    I, on the other hand, don't trust anything that anybody brings in unless I see them open the original package. I never participate in cover-dish events unless I bring in something from the grocer with original packaging like a pound cake or plastic ware, etc., and I never return to my meal if, for whatever reason, I couldn't finish it in one sitting. People are definitely different today..

  • Aug 29

    Both of my jobs have signs on the fridge from exasperated coworkers telling people to stop stealing the food of others.

    Seriously? If it's not yours, don't take it folks. If you forgot your food, do not, I repeat, DO NOT steal the food of others.

    And on a related topic, please take your rotting leftovers out of the fridge after a month or two, ok?

  • Aug 29

    Quote from LotusPetals82
    In Florida, it's not in our scope of practice.
    What kinda scope is that? You are not even touching the patient.

  • Aug 29

    According to my observations, "it is not within my scope of practice" should be read as "I heck do not want to do it, whatever the reason" in like 8 cases out of 10.

  • Aug 29

    Funny, we changed leg bag to bedside bag every single day when I was a CNA. I agree, she is being insubordinate after several attempts at coaching. You have handled it to the best of your ability...time to let management handle it as a disciplinary issue.

  • Aug 29

    CNA has used "not in my scope of practice and I do not know how to do it".. many times to get out of her duties.
    Supervision agrees it IS in her scope, you should not do any further follow up. It is not your place to contact the BON.
    The next time CNA refuses your direction... write it up.

  • Aug 24

    Quote from Alicee
    I've seen a lot of nurses who obviously hate their jobs and are extremely rude to patients, so in my opinion I feel like you do need to have some sort of passion or motivation for doing it. Maybe that isn't true since obviously a lot of people here feel that it's just their job and are still able to preform well, but I wonder what causes those nurses (the ones who hate it) to feel so negatively about it.
    Many nurses who "hate their jobs" are experiencing compassion fatigue or burnout. It usually gets those nurses who Have A Calling first.

  • Aug 24

    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Will you PLEASE use the "quote" feature so we can know who the heck you are talking to?

    ........and YOUR idea of "sin" and mine are complete different. I think it more of a "sin" to judge others' reasons for entering nursing or any field of employment, for that matter. It pays my bills. It would be more "sinful" to abdicate my responsibilities to my family and pay my bills.

    Further, I reserve my compassion for those suffering/sick. Those doctors we call all hours knew darn well what they got into. They need to suck it up and be professional.

    There is room for us all at the nursing table and personally, I don't give a damn why people choose to enter nursing as long as they are sincere.
    I second the request for using the quote feature, and again express my abhorrence for the judgemental attitude of the poster. I don't think it's anyone's business why anyone chose to enter nursing beyond what they choose to share. And I don't give a damn why, either, as long as they're competent.

    The competence thing is where a lot of "the calling" folks have problems, and many of them don't see it as a problem because they just KNOW they're so much more compassionate than anyone else.

  • Aug 24

    Quote from Newelette1
    It definitely us a passion for helping others, though many do it for strictly monetary gain. I personally think it's sinful to do just for money. The love of people, and helping get the sick recover is rewarding above what I can write or think.
    If there was a hell, it would be chock full of nurses.

    Pass the board, find a grueling job, get back to us in a year.

  • Aug 24

    Quote from Newelette1
    It definitely us a passion for helping others, though many do it for strictly monetary gain. I personally think it's sinful to do just for money. The love of people, and helping get the sick recover is rewarding above what I can write or think.
    SINFUL? Sinful?

    While I am happy for you that you've found a rewarding position, I have to caution you that nursing is a career, not a calling. "Just for the money" is an appropriate reason as any other for going into the field, and I've found that folks who have researched the career and decided that the schedule flexibility, stablility, benefits and income meet their needs are folks who are more likely to have career longevity than folks who are in it because they think they have a calling.

    Your post is inappropriate in this venue. You want to talk about sin, your place is the Nursing and Spirituality Forum.

  • Aug 24

    Quote from Been there,done that
    Nursing is not a passion or a calling... it's a job. Some were drawn to the field for altruistic reasons.. but corporate health care beat that out of them.
    You will have your own reasons to start, stay, or stop.

    Best wishes , whatever you decide.
    I totally agree. It doesn't matter how or why you came to be a nurse. All that matters is that you do a good job. I suppose this is true for almost any job but I feel like the patients are vulnerable and relying on us to advocate for them so it is that much more important. Just keep their best interest in mind and the rest should (hopefully) fall I place.

  • Aug 21

    Probably because our little babies are like nothing you have ever dealt with before. Our hospital won't even consider hiring an NNP that doesn't have 2 years of NICU nursing in addition to schooling. Unless you have been oriented to work in a NICU you won't understand the workflow, the protocols, the care. These aren't little adults or little peds patients,they are their own entity. And we get many people who start in NICU and don't make it because it isn't what they envisioned.

    Have you shadowed in a unit? I would do that before you slam schools not taking you without experience. It may open your eyes. You had another thread about "pulling the plug"....well, it isn't all roses and rainbows in NICU and you should have the experience of caring for a baby who has no chance of a normal life, one who survive with multiple issues, dealing with parents and helping guide them thru this process. There are worse things than dying in our world. You need to care for that 22 weeker that has a massive head bleed, failing kidneys, bad lungs to see what it is like. Or that baby that is in your unit for a year with a trach, GT and develops pulmonary hypertension, a baby born with multiple anomolies that requires extensive care on both nursing and doctor end. It will make you a stronger NNP to experience it as a nurse. You will learn the pathophys inside and out. Hands on care is the best way to learn.

    My advice is try to get a job in a NICU, work your two years and then go back to school.

  • Aug 21

    Quote from SunshineeStudent
    Currently I'm in school finishing my RN degree but as soon as I finish I want to enter grad school for my MSN or DNP, Neonatal Nurse Practitioner. The thing is, it's SO DIFFICULT! One of my previous classmates graduated in May and is now a RN, she immediately was accepted into the Acute Care:Pediatric NP program at the school I want to apply to, but for the Neonatal NP program you have to have 2 years in a Level 3 NICU. Other schools I want to apply to have that same rule! Mind you, there are not many schools that actually have a NNP program, which is so sad. One school has stopped accepting applications because of the lack of resources.

    My question(s) are why do you have to work in a Level 2/3/4 NICU for 2 years when you can enter an Acute Care Pediatric NP program with 0 experience? Also why is there such a shortage of Neonatal programs? It's almost as if Neonatal education is the last priority when it comes to specialties.

    I asked one of my instructors about why there's a shortage of NNP programs and she said she didn't know but she also said that is the reason Neonatal NPs are the highest paid NP in our state(behind CRNA) making a little bit above Psych.
    A couple possibilities:
    1- Given a free market economy, you pretty much have answered your own question. Since there are few openings for a highly paid specialty, they can be selective, and accept more qualified applicants. If there were a lot of openings and it paid low, they would accept less qualified people.

    2- Since it is so easy to kill really sick little babies, maybe they figure you should have some experience to reduce the amount of little babies who die.

  • Aug 21

    Quote from SunshineeStudent
    My question(s) are why do you have to work in a Level 2/3/4 NICU for 2 years when you can enter an Acute Care Pediatric NP program with 0 experience?
    I think the more important question is, why would a pediatric NP program accept students with no experience?

  • Aug 21

    Nursing is not a passion or a calling... it's a job. Some were drawn to the field for altruistic reasons.. but corporate health care beat that out of them.
    You will have your own reasons to start, stay, or stop.

    Best wishes , whatever you decide.


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