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Palliative Care, DNP 13,163 Views

Joined Jun 28, '11 - from 'Virginia'. Palliative Care, DNP is a DNP, FNP. She has 'Since 2009' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Family Nurse Practitioner'. Posts: 749 (56% Liked) Likes: 1,851

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  • Jun 21

    Sorry that sounds miserable. Maybe start applying for new jobs just to see if there are other options?

  • Jun 13

    I'm also in a hospital. For our hospice/comfort care patients there is an order set that includes no scheduled vitals, no blood glucose checks, no blood draws, etc. Our primary goal is comfort.

  • Jun 4

    Quote from Ruby Vee
    It may be a fact that bullying was a part of your nursing education, and that may indeed why you in particular seem to "see" so much of it out there. Bullying seems to be a matter of perception, and these days the perception is to treat any uncomfortable interaction as bullying. The definition of bullying seems to have become so watered-down that it's meaningless.

    When someone systemically sets out to damage you, shredding your reputation with lies, endangering your livelihood, changing your work schedule or assignments, badmouthing you to management, patients, visitors, ancillary staff and physicians, calling you at home in the middle of your sleep period over and over to demand answers to inconsequential questions, scheduling you for every single holiday shift, seeking out your SO to flirt with them and tell them lies about you cheating on them, blaming you for a sentinel event that was caused by the nurse working next to you despite the fact that you never went near that nurse or her patient because you were busy helping the new grad on the other side of you all night and someone else was helping that nurse at the time of the event . . . That's bullying.

    Chastising you for incorrectly calculating the insulin dose, failing to get it double checked and overdosing your patient AGAIN is not bullying. Failing to ask you to lunch, again not bullying. Not saying hello (because she couldn't see without her glasses, which were all fogged up) is not bullying. Giving folks encouragement to see all the minor stuff as actually bullying really takes away from the experience of those who have experienced actual bullying.

    There is bullying out there -- there are bullies. I've seen two in forty years. That does not mean that everyone someone perceives as bullying is actually bullying.
    You believe that is rare in nursing? Those who set out to sabotage? I can't even believe you mean that in 30 years you have been oblivious to such a pervasive practice.

  • Jun 4

    Quote from jmkRNBSN2012
    but nursing is a calling not a job.
    Perhaps to you, but please do not generalize that to all nurses. I do not feel called to be a nurse. It is something that I am interested in and provides a decent steady paycheck.

  • Jun 4

    Quote from Ruby Vee
    It may be a fact that bullying was a part of your nursing education, and that may indeed why you in particular seem to "see" so much of it out there. Bullying seems to be a matter of perception, and these days the perception is to treat any uncomfortable interaction as bullying. The definition of bullying seems to have become so watered-down that it's meaningless.

    When someone systemically sets out to damage you, shredding your reputation with lies, endangering your livelihood, changing your work schedule or assignments, badmouthing you to management, patients, visitors, ancillary staff and physicians, calling you at home in the middle of your sleep period over and over to demand answers to inconsequential questions, scheduling you for every single holiday shift, seeking out your SO to flirt with them and tell them lies about you cheating on them, blaming you for a sentinel event that was caused by the nurse working next to you despite the fact that you never went near that nurse or her patient because you were busy helping the new grad on the other side of you all night and someone else was helping that nurse at the time of the event . . . That's bullying.

    Chastising you for incorrectly calculating the insulin dose, failing to get it double checked and overdosing your patient AGAIN is not bullying. Failing to ask you to lunch, again not bullying. Not saying hello (because she couldn't see without her glasses, which were all fogged up) is not bullying. Giving folks encouragement to see all the minor stuff as actually bullying really takes away from the experience of those who have experienced actual bullying.

    There is bullying out there -- there are bullies. I've seen two in forty years. That does not mean that everyone someone perceives as bullying is actually bullying.
    While I respect your opinion and agree to a point, I still stand by my position. Like you, I have been a nurse a long time, in several practice areas and numerous hospitals and states. As such, I certainly don't need a definition or examples as to what constitutes 'bullying', nor do I believe most reasonable nurses do either. Nursing is very 'cliquish' and God help the poor souls that, for whatever reason, don't quite fit in to their unit's culture or others' expectations-in those instances, it's not enough to be a dedicated, conscientious and competent practitioner. Judging from my experiences and the comments of younger nurses, bullying is a pervasive problem that affects us all and which we all need take active steps to overcome. As I've said before, our profession can do better!

  • Jun 4

    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Those who look for bullies and bullying will find them. Those who don't look for them seem not to find them.
    You are in denial. Bullying in nursing is so pervasive it was part of my nursing education. That is a fact. Just because you haven't experienced it does not mean it does not exist.

  • Jun 4

    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Those who look for bullies and bullying will find them. Those who don't look for them seem not to find them.
    Sorry, I respectfully disagree. While I acknowledge that abuse is, at times, a relative perception, your statement, in a way, negates many's legitimate concerns by implying that if you've not witnessed it, it therefore must not exist-a classic non sequitur argument! As a caucasian male, I've not personally witnessed racial discrimination, however, I know that it is all too real for many and is a terrible blight upon our society! Your casual dismissal of these bullying assertions tells these nurses, in effect, that they just need to 'suck it up' or 'grow thicker skin'! Sorry, but this isn't the world we live in any more and people, whether they're Walmart workers, coal miners, or nurses should be treated with honesty, respect, and civility! Our profession deserves better than this harsh, antiquated approach-sorry!

  • Jun 4

    Quote from Ruby Vee
    I've been a nurse for forty years, worked in five states in a number of different hospitals and I've never encountered more than two real bullies in all that time. I've never encountered coworkers "using energy to be mean to other nurses", making fun of or humiliating one another or "straight outta junior high". Sure, I've encountered some who were more or less clueless about teamwork, some managers with unrealistic expectations and some patients and family members who are toxic. I'm not sure it's just dumb luck on your part (or mine); I think it's the result of working at workplace relationships rather than just expecting something from a workplace relationship that isn't realistic and being unhappy when it isn't forthcoming.
    You are the exception. I have never been targeted by bully nurses but I have seen them in action in every facility I have ever worked.

  • Jun 4

    I have been a nurse for 16 years and I am in my 40's as well and I can definitely relate. To those who are not nurses I don't feel you have room to talk. To those who are and feel differently I'm glad your experience has been different. However, the comment overall is true. This can be found by doing any small amount of research about the nursing profession and the stated reasons for burnout or leaving the profession. All nursing boards are aware and are working to find solutions. It may be offensive to some to hear this about their profession but it is non the less true.
    The problem is that it's not what I signed up for. In school they tell you about delegating but in the real world there is no one to delegate to most times. Further, why am I held accountable for a mistake of my superior? No, that's craziness and you don't find that in other professions. Moreover, bedside nurses are overloaded with tasks and held accountable for most things concerning patient care yet they have NO say so in developing patient care policies and standards. By and large they are taught to allow themselves to be disrespected by doctors who can be abrasive, loud and down out right ugly. We are taught to overlook their behavior as "boys behaving badly" so to speak rather than developing a"0" tolerance. To respond in a way other than tolerance causes reprimand of the nurse, instead of the perpetrator.
    Lastly, with JCO core measures and ACA pay for performance there has been even more tasks added to nurses plates; yet there has been very little income growth over the last 20 years. The starting salary of newer nurses is only a few dollars more than it was when I started 16 years ago. The profession overall is disrepected and I believe its because it is a female dominated profession where showing compassion has been portrayed as the main skill rather than promoting health and saving lives. But of course if that's a nurses platform then what will doctors be known for?
    To those of you who say leave.....It's not your profession to allow me in or put me out. I EARNED the right to be here. I love caring for patients. I hate the circumstances in which I have to do it.

  • Jun 4

    Quote from BedsideNurse
    I've tried on several occasions to sway unsuspecting friends and family members from going to nursing school. I hate to discourage people, but certainly there are better ways to make a living. :/ I do appreciate the redeeming aspects of nursing; taking care of patients offers some of the most interesting & satisfying work around, you can meet and work with some pretty awesome people, it's very flexible as far as the kind of work you can do, and the pay is okay/decent, especially if you have seniority. All that being said, I can honestly say I'm not sure it's worth the emotional and physical bludgeoning you take nearly every time you walk through the hospital door. Chronic understaffing makes already difficult work a lot harder--and it hurts the patients--and that just *sucks.* I like being at bedside, but I'm SO glad I'm not just starting out. Due to finances I have a number of years in front of me (God willing), but at least there is light at the end of the nursing tunnel. I can't imagine doing this another 20. OMG.
    I second this outlook on the future of nursing. Hierarchical power structures have been put in place by corporate health care that largely favor physicians above their own employees due to their ability to generate revenue. I've witnessed, on more than one occasion, hospital administration turning a blind eye on MD practitioners who are mostly inept and others who are tyrants that consistently berate staff and are verbally abusive. I've posted this before, but after 25 years of active practice, my recommendation to a young person is NOT to pursue nursing as a career choice-perhaps advanced practice, but never acute care, hospital nursing! Instead, get a different four year degree and become an engineer, CPA.....waaaay better hours, working environment, respect, pay, fewer weekends, holiday. Just my opinion

  • Jun 4

    I somewhat agree with the OP. Nursing is very romanticized, especially during nursing school. The reality is quite different...

  • Jun 4

    Consider yourself truly blessed and lucky to consistently have worked in pleasant conditions. I worked as a nurse in the clinical setting for many years then went to a desk job as I thought I was getting too old for the pace. I enjoyed my desk job but wanted patient interaction and I missed taking care of them. Now, returning to the clinical area I find the culture just as my friend (who is the same age) told me it would be. I originally thought she was exaggerating or just was overly sensitive. But, her words have rung true. I like the word "toxic" you used as it describes it very well. I hate my job but I love my patients. I will love taking care of them in a different role as a FNP in the future.

  • Jun 4

    Very well said, brandy1017. I am an older person who returned to clinical nursing to update my assessment skills as preparation for FNP school. I was warned about the current nursing culture and she was spot on. It is vicious. Nurses (not all but most) are aggressively mean. Not just rude. I'm talking using energy to be mean to other nurses. Making fun of another in front of other nurses and humiliating another in front of patients. Very cliquish and definitely straight outta junior high.
    It is disappointing to say the least. The documentation alone is a reason to avoid this "profession." In fact, I know of one nurse who quit simply because the documentation requirements were just too much for him. He's now a trainer at a gym making more.
    But, if you are making minimum at the local retailer, .... Just think twice.

  • Jun 4

    Why so many piling on because Modern RN spoke his mind about his negative experiences and feelings about being a nurse. There are so many vent threads on this forum, too numerous to count, about the negatives of nursing. All of sudden everyone and his brother feels the need to come and proclaim their love for nursing, how wonderful it is and how he should just get out! Sounds pretty judgemental to me. Why the hypocropsy! Why are nurses supposed to say they love their job in spite of all the well documented problems we all face or most of us anyway.

    Let's be honest we don't all love nursing, many do it because they need the money and now have student loans to pay back. Many are going into nursing because its one of the few jobs that pay a living and many already have degrees in other fields but are unable to get a decent paying job so go into nursing.

    If I could afford to I would leave nursing. But I am too young to retire and have a mortgage etc and need a job that pays a living wage. People suggest if you are not happy get a different job and they suggest clinic or homecare etc. Maybe that will work for some people, but probably not for the number of burnt out nurses that want a change. I doubt there are enough jobs available especially since many clinics are now using medical assistants instead of LPN's yet alone RN's. Also I don't like the idea of the wear and tear of your car if you go the homecare route and may end up being paid by the visit.

    I honestly would not recommend nursing to anyone either for all the many negatives that I have neither the time or desire to rehash! I understand people are going to continue to go into nursing for the need of a decent paycheck and the hope to make a difference, but the reality is many will be blocked by corporate healthcare's need to grind them into the ground to make an excess profit for the CEO and his buddies at the top!

  • Jun 4

    Quote from Simplistic
    Oops. I guess youre right, to a degree. Let me rephrase what I said. Being a registered nurse does suck.. Np for the win!!
    I thought you were still in nursing school?

    OP, I appreciate the warning, but if you honestly think anyone hoping to be a nurse in the furture that hangs around here thinks that nursing is all compliments, sunshine and cupcakes, you don't hang out here much yourself.


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