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Fiona59 39,115 Views

Joined Oct 9, '04. She has 'Ten plus' year(s) of experience. Posts: 8,149 (39% Liked) Likes: 8,701

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  • Feb 18

    Speak to the DON and make her aware about this issue.

  • Feb 16

    Quote from OrganizedChaos
    Woah. Now I want to move to Canada even more!
    I don't think our licenses would be recognized up there. From what I understand, LPN education up there is 2 years (our ADN) and their RN is a 4 year program (our BSN).

    It would definitely be interesting to see the difference in education between their LPN and ours.

  • Feb 14

    So initially you said, "You start compressions, I'll bag." Fair enough.

    Now it's 1 minute and 45 seconds into delivering high-quality compressions. Rescuer #2 says "I'm getting fatigued. We need to switch after this cycle."

    What do you do? We both know 2 minutes in, EMS is not there yet. You must either take over compressions per BLS protocol, or you allow the fatigued rescuer to continue knowing full well that high-quality compressions are becoming medical-drama-quality compressions. That doesn't sound reasonable in a position were you're looked to as the medical person.

  • Feb 14

    Quote from Ruby Vee
    If your employer agrees that it isn't a big deal because there is always another first responder around, then perhaps you're OK.
    I wish the OP no ill, but just have to say that, if I were going to be the "another first responder around," I would not be happy about having to work with someone who couldn't do her/his fair share in a code, just as I would not be happy about being expected to pick up the slack for a co-worker who couldn't do any other part of the basic responsibilities of the job.

  • Feb 14

    I broke my wrist several years ago. I was not able to return to work until they cleared me to return without restrictions, partially because of CPR, and all nurses being required to be able to perform CPR. As I result, I was out of work over 4 months.

  • Feb 14

    I'm sorry, but CPR is an essential function of an RN. The ADA can't help that. If you can't do it, then you need to retire or get a different job. It is horrible to have physical limitations but it is for the safety of our patients. What would happen if you are a single responder? You have to be able to do CPR until EMS arrives.

  • Feb 14

    I wouldn't necessarily assume you can't do CPR. I have the same condition you referenced, among others, which are more commonly known as just a "bad back". I see a physical therapist regularly and one of the first things we worked on was common movements at work including CPR. With the right technique, it's possible to produce high quality CPR even with a delicate bad back.

  • Feb 14

    I did not like your poll options. So either you employer knows or does not know about your restrictions. If they do that is reckless to have you in a clinical role. If they don't know what are you waiting for. You are of retirement age maybe its time to do something else. I don't want you to do compressions because of your condition if it will flare up things. If you are employed by a hospital anytime you walk through the hospital someone could need compression and as first responder that is your job.

  • Feb 14

    Quote from Sour Lemon
    I can't imagine that a nursing employer would be required to accommodate a nurse who is unable to do CPR.
    That is my thought as well. If the job requires CPR certification with the expectation of performing CPR if needed, then this would not be a reasonable accommodation.

  • Feb 14

    I can't imagine that a nursing employer would be required to accommodate a nurse who is unable to do CPR.

  • Feb 13

    Quote from Phil-on-a-bike
    8's all the way!


    Here's the bottom line, 12-hourers: You're a train wreck.

    I've done my share of 12-hour shifts.
    I was in my twenties, very fit, highly motivated, full of energy and for all I know, quite possibly bulletproof.
    I totally agree. 12s are for the young. And I think most nurses really don't see how the 12s affect them over time. I know after being on 8s for a month my sleep returned to completely normal patterns (and I worked 12 hour days). I didn't find myself waking up 3-4 times per night. Oh it is so much better! But to each their own! It is much easier for hospitals to schedule people in 12 hour blocks!

  • Feb 13

    8's all the way!

    My department includes staff who work 8-hr shifts and staff who work 12's.

    I've heard the "I only work three days a week!" mantra many times. Here's something to think about, though:

    At the end of those three 12-hr shifts... I take handover from those staff.
    They're visibly exhausted, flustered, distracted, disorganized, short-tempered and dishevelled.

    Here's the bottom line, 12-hourers: You're a train wreck.

    And the thing is: you don't see it!

    You don't see it, because it's crept up on you gradually over thirty-six hours of solid work.
    But it's immediately apparent to the rest of us.

    And - no offence - but I don't want to look like that.

    I've done my share of 12-hour shifts.
    I was in my twenties, very fit, highly motivated, full of energy and for all I know, quite possibly bulletproof.
    Plus, I was working overseas, and I wanted those extra days off to Road Trip my new surroundings.
    And short term, it was perfectly viable.

    I know better than to think I could pull it off now!

    There's another point: we are - supposedly - an evidence-led profession.

    The evidence is hard to quantify, because we're mostly looking at subjective, quality-of-life criteria, but: what data there is associates longer shifts with increased incidences of poor care, adverse events, patient safety issues, and occupational hazards such as needlesticks and musculoskeletal injuries.

    link to a Nursing Times article citing some of those findings: The 12-hour shift: friend or foe? | Practice | Nursing Times

  • Feb 13

    I much rather have 8 hour shifts. The reason is the following:

    1. Eight hours is less than 12 hours.

    2. The work load would be done at a good rate at eight hours versus working 12 long hours.

    3. I enjoy and much prefer working 8 hour days because mentally it seems more better to my mind.

    4. If I had to work a 12 hour day, my brain and my body would hurt and I would definitely have a harder time getting out of bed.

  • Feb 13

    LOVE my 8's! I'm with you - I like the overtime after 8 hours. I can do a 10 easily but those 12's kill me. My new job requires 3 12 hour shifts once a month, 3 days in a row. I know I can do it but I bet the first few are a killer.

  • Feb 13

    Prefer eight hour shifts because they allow for a second job, having a life, perhaps getting enough rest, and not having to deal with employers cheating me out of the state labor law mandated overtime pay.


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