Content That Fiona59 Likes

Content That Fiona59 Likes

Fiona59 33,366 Views

Joined Oct 9, '04. She has 'Ten plus' year(s) of experience. Posts: 7,992 (39% Liked) Likes: 8,334

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  • May 30

    Quote from TiffyRN

    I'll admit it makes me a little crazy when people argue about this topic. It emphasizes to me how the RN is so much more than a list of psycho-motor skills!
    ALLnurses, whether LPN or RN, are so much more than a list of psycho-motor skills; educated in critical thinking, nursing judgment, and holistic care in the first classes in school, all the way up to the NCLEX; and then afterwards a good facility, preceptorship, and management will emphasize that quality.

  • May 29

    NurseFifty made a statement that access to health care is tied to a Social Security number, but Canada doesn't have those, we have Social Insurance numbers; And it's not true that access to health care is tied to them; it IS tied to a provincial health care number, in Alberta we call them Universal Lifetime Identifiers. Newborns who haven't had their births registered are still able to access required care... I'm sitting next to one of them as I type.

    MunoRN mentioned BC sending patients to California for cardiac surgery. Not true. They send their complex cases to Alberta. The Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute provides cutting-edge cardiac surgical care to thousands of patients of all ages every year, as does the KC Hui Centre at the Royal Alexandra Hospital. The pediatric cardiac ICU at the Stollery Children's Hospital in Edmonton has the best outcomes in North America for pediatric cardiac surgeries over several metrics. None of those families receives a bill for this high-quality care. Patients from all over Canada have their surgeries at the Stollery and the cost of their care is billed to their province of origin.

    Quote from Xlorgguss
    If there is only a single payer system, would there be as much "business" in healthcare?
    There definitely IS less "business" involved here in Canada. Most physicians however do have private practices that require administrative supports and someone to keep track of billing. It's illegal to advertise pharmaceuticals direct-to-consumer and physicians are not really allowed to advertise their services either unless they're providing purely elective treatment (think Botox for wrinkles - Botox for spasticity is covered).

    Quote from Xlorgguss
    If institutions are getting reimbursement the same would there be less of a push towards customer service and more emphasis on actual care? So for instance would something like having a baby be the same cost at each and every hospital in the country? Would there be a flat rate for each procedure or lab work or anything like that?
    While we want to be seen as meeting patients' satisfaction it's not the driver of our work. The best outcome for the patient is.

    Quote from Xlorgguss
    Would having a single payer system being more transparency to the actual costs of healthcare?
    There was a time when some of the provinces would send out statements of health care expenditures to patients, partly to show what health care actually costs and partly to ensure the care billed for was actually delivered. The administrative costs of this program were determined to be poor value so they stopped doing it. Occasionally the topic comes up but typically dies on the vine.

    Quote from RainMom
    Interesting. I was led to believe by a medical device rep from Canada that most Canadians also carry a supplemental policy. For instance, after a minor knee surgery, he stated his PT was only covered by the supplement, not the basic free coverage. Otherwise PT would have been out of pocket for him.
    Supplemental insurance, as stated above, is to cover the things the province doesn't. Most employers provide this coverage at low cost. It pays for vision care, dental care, prescription drugs administered at home, semi- or private hospital accommodations (although many hospitals only have at most 2 patients per room except when on over-capacity protocol), ambulance charges, durable aids like crutches ad wheelchairs and so on.

    Quote from Eru Ilúvatar
    Well it is partially by outcome, the patient has to be alive and at least free of any nosocomial infections I would say. But a big deciding factor in reimbursement is a survey that the patient receives that is then used to calculate reimbursement, hence the current focus on costumer service at the current moment.
    Not so. I've had several hospitalizations in the past several years, surgeries, diagnostic imaging and many, many labs. I've never been asked to fill out a satisfaction survey. Hospitals have capital budgets that cover the day-to-day costs of running the facility; physicians bill on a fee-for-service basis, labs bill the province based on volumes of tests - a fee schedule is readily available on request. The care I receive is no better or worse than any other person with my health issues.



    Quote from XNavyCorpsman
    Lets just set the record straight......Single Payer is so astronomically expensive it will never happen in the US. I am not saying I am for or against single payer, but we could NEVER afford to implement the Single Payer system here in the US.
    When more than 30% of all dollars spent on "health care" goes to administration - insurance companies, billing offices, pushing paper around ad infinitum - how can the cost of implementing a single payer, which would eliminate most of that waste, be more expensive than what you're doing?

    I'd also like to clear up the piece of misinformation that keeps popping up when universal access and single-payer systems are discussed. The government DOES NOT DECIDE WHO GETS CARE, OR WHAT CARE THEY GET. The government also does not dictate who provides your care. If I don't like my family doctor, I can pick someone else. If I see a surgeon for a consult and decide I don't like his or her bedside manner, I can ask for a referral to someone else. And I will. My husband and son also have chronic health issues - my son's from birth -that are very well looked after. There are worse things than a single-payer, universal access health care system.

  • May 29

    You don't say what style you wear your hair in, it's length or specific objections she had, so that makes it hard to give specific advice. (not sure if that's really you, most people here don't use real photo's)

    First I would check your facilities policies related to dress code and appearance, to make sure you are not in violation.
    Second I would make sure there is no problems with your hair draping onto a sterile field, in a patients face or in a "dirty" area. So if it's long, tie it back while on shift.

    Years ago when I was in LPN school, we weren't allowed to have our hair even touch our collars. While I don't know of any facility that is that strict anymore, but the general idea of keeping it out of the way could still pertain.

    If you are within code, then I would followup with her about the policy. I'd ask her to clarify in what way are you not meeting the facilities expectations (make sure its the facilities not hers). Just be careful of your tone while your talking so you can't be mistaken as insubordinate. Maybe if you can agree that your look follows code then she'll back off.

  • May 29

    Lisa.FNP: your pic is great scrub-porn! /in love/

    As far as the question: I think I have 5-7 sets of Koi brand that fit right now. [emoji38][emoji5]️ after I finish doing laundry today, I'll have a more accurate count! [emoji28]

    I know I have 2 1/2 more sets that did fit/will fit me soon....I picked up some weight when in school!! They are greys anatomy, which fit a little slimmer than my Kois of the same size.

    And as far as shoes.....4 pairs of nursing clogs and several pairs of tennis shoes that match my scrubs!

  • May 29

    Quote from sallyrnrrt
    I have similar collection, but dog gone, not near as organized
    Thanks, this closet is in the Guest room. My husband bought all of these scrub tops and pants folded on each hanger. I had enough outfits that they would only be worn twice a year this would keep them looking new.

    But if you think that is something you should see my walk-in-closet. With 2 levels of hangers racks on the wall surrounding the 3 sides to a 8' x 10' room with just my cloth, my husband has his own closet. My real problem is I have loaded the 8+8+8+8+5+5ft hanger racks, a total of 42 feet of hanger space. It's fully loaded with hundreds & hundred's of outfits. I have way to many cloth that I can longer hang another hanger let alone one with cloth on it.
    Then there's the shoes, but that's another post..... Wonderful thing is, it's my husband who shops and buys everything for me.

  • May 29

    Quote from kiszi
    (admiring lisa.fnp's collection and the fact that her hangers are all the same color and the fact that she has that kind of closet space to allocate to scrubs)
    I have a closet designated as "scrub land," or "scrub closet." Though I just cleaned out about 10 sets of scrubs, some from 2005. Brand? Dickies. They last forever!

  • May 29

    So we went from wear whatever to a uniform awhile back, but I recently moved to the OR and have to wear hospital provided scrubs right? BUT now I get to wear scrub caps and holy crap Batman...my locker is getting stuffed with scrub caps. So many patterns and designs and yea. It's a problem

  • May 29

    I have similar collection, but dog gone, not near as organized

  • May 29

    Quote from Lisa.fnp
    Attachment 22322

    96 sets assorted and 10 royal blue 10 whites tops and pants not pictured. Funny thing is I haven't worn them in a few years now that I'm in primary care.
    (admiring lisa.fnp's collection and the fact that her hangers are all the same color and the fact that she has that kind of closet space to allocate to scrubs)

  • May 29

    Quote from Lisa.fnp
    Attachment 22322

    96 sets assorted and 10 royal blue 10 whites tops and pants not pictured. Funny thing is I haven't worn them in a few years now that I'm in primary care.
    Prepare yourself: I saved mine from my first job when subsequent jobs required other colors. When I got them out about 6 years later, any item with elastic was ruined due to the elastic hardening & cracking. Some of the tops had developed yellow stains of unknown origin, just from hanging in the closet, I guess.

    My only consolation was that they still fit

  • May 29

    Quote from Lisa.fnp
    Attachment 22322

    96 sets assorted and 10 royal blue 10 whites tops and pants not pictured. Funny thing is I haven't worn them in a few years now that I'm in primary care.
    Wow!!!!


    Ok this makes me feel less guilty about the 20 tops I've bought in the past few weeks!
    (Only 11 can be worn year round though because the rest are Halloween or Christmas.)

  • May 29

    When I first started a few years ago, I bought 6 sets. This would last me for one working rotation and I would have one extra set just in case. Fast forward to now and I show up to work in a plain shirt and hoodie when I work a later shift or on a weekend. I've found that I go through a set or two throughout my working rotation.

  • May 29

    Attachment 22322

    96 sets assorted and 10 royal blue 10 whites tops and pants not pictured. Funny thing is I haven't worn them in a few years now that I'm in primary care.

  • May 29

    Quote from hillbillienurse
    I did not present my question as a complaint, but as a question. I wrote the question for a friend. Now that the bad attitude bunch has squealed and shaken a crooked finger, I will wait and be appreciative of answers that aren't laden with venom from elsewhere.
    I did not sense any negativity in this thread, except for this response. You asked a question in an online forum and everyone pretty much gave you the most honest answer, whether or not it's the response you want to hear.

    I used to pick up OT as a tech or sitter.... It was a nice little break from nursing duties while still getting paid as a nurse. There were times when I came into work and was floated from nurse to tech, which was a nice little relief (at the time, I worked on a busy telemetry unit with 8-9 patients on night shift). CNA duties are part of nursing duties... If there are no techs/CNA on the floor... The nurse would have to do it all anyway.

  • May 29

    Quote from hillbillienurse
    I did not present my question as a complaint, but as a question. I wrote the question for a friend. Now that the bad attitude bunch has squealed and shaken a crooked finger, I will wait and be appreciative of answers that aren't laden with venom from elsewhere.
    Good grief. Another snowflake heard from.


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