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Fiona59 39,531 Views

Joined Oct 9, '04. She has 'Ten plus' year(s) of experience. Posts: 8,159 (39% Liked) Likes: 8,711

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  • Mar 25

    Canada doesn't have "travel nurses" in the sense that I think the OP is meaning. Short-term contracts are not a thing here because most facilities (hospitals, nursing homes, rehabilitation centres, LTACHs etc) are unionized. So you wouldn't be able to work for 13 weeks in Toronto, then 13 weeks in Ottawa, then 13 weeks in Kingston, for example. Plus, the average cost of nursing registration is heading for $500 a YEAR; we renew annually and our registration is only good in the province it was obtained from. Most nurses don't hold more than one registration here. (We don't refer to our credentials as licenses.) What IS possible it to work short-ish stints in the far north. But that likely wouldn't appeal by virtue of the fact these communities are extremely isolated, winter is about 8 months long and there's a dearth of entertainment there.

  • Mar 24

    If you think your job is stressful please, please do not consider nursing to be an easier way to make a living. Nursing school and work will be nothing but stress for you. Nursing is one of the most stressful careers on the planet IMHO.

  • Mar 24

    Quote from mw73
    Cococure, yes I would like to shadow, and am going to start volunteering at a hospital to see how I like it. I haven't spoken to anyone who has done a direct entry program, was really hoping to hear from a few on this forum... What do you think is different about NP stress compared to bedside? I would be naive to think that there isn't some significant stress with nursing, especially since you are dealing with people's lives; however, at this point I am trying to quantify how that stress will be different and if I could handle it.

    I got a very specialized degree and am not able to practice in the private sector without getting my doctorate. At this point I don't like my job well enough to do that. There are other districts I could work for, but long story short, the state which I live in does not practice the way I was trained, and what I was taught to be best practice. I am not willing to move back to where I was trained for a $20,000 pay decrease, especially when most of my family and boyfriend are here. Not to mention, most of the people I graduated with do not like their jobs, and most of the people that I know within this field are unhappy. I hate that I am not doing what I was trained to do and I am not helping kids. So, I am re-evaluating where I want to be and what other field would be a good fit for me.

    How much longer until you're done with your program? Thanks for good luck wishes!
    This is not quantifiable and as strangers on the internet, we would have no way of knowing if you could handle it.Frankly, if meetings and paperwork stress you out-I would say nursing is not a career path you want to follow.

  • Mar 24

    You will know nothing but constant stress ESPECIALLY if you go through a "Direct MSN" for your NP. I could not imagine trying to function as an NP without a baseline knowledge obtained through years of clinical experiences and application of knowledge.

  • Mar 24

    You do realize that you have to be a nurse before you can be a nurse practitioner, right? Most people think of nursing a stressful profession, with staffing issues, deadlines, charting to do (much of which isn't helpful to the patient but to some person who is doing a study and needs this exact bit of information that you're probably already charting somewhere else), families, physicians, ancillary services, etc. all clamoring for help/information/etc. Graduate credits are expensive. Are you in a position to pay for school, or will you be taking out loans that you'll have to pay back? If you're no spring chicken, are you going to be able to pay back those loans and comfortably pay for retirement?

  • Mar 23

    I would pass on that job ....sounds more like indentured servitude.

  • Mar 20

    Quote from Jules A
    This! In 10 years I've called in twice for legit illness as above, once for a car accident on the way to work the car was totaled and twice when I was so disgusted with things that I was on my way out. So the tally in a decade is 3 legit and 2 where I wanted to burn some of my sick time. The truth is if they had offered PTO which I could have cashed out when I left instead of sick time I wouldn't have called out for the latter either. Actually the sick vs PTO is a suggestion I'm going to add in the other running thread about sick calls.

    I'm pleasantly surprised and would love to work with most of you who have posted here as it sounds like you are dedicated employees.
    (Bolding emphasis mine.) I completely agree with you. My hospital used to give yearly bonuses for "perfect attendance" and cash out sick time PTO when employees resign or retire. Now, it's use it or lose it..thousands of hard-earned dollars donated to the hospital. Do I use my sick time? You bet I do. In fact, I am using mine next week. I do not like leaving my colleagues in a bind so we inform each other beforehand and enlist available per diems to fill the holes.

    So to answer the OP: What is my real reason for calling out? Allergic reaction to the BS at work. Remedied by a week off, deep spring cleaning, reading at Central Park, an afternoon at the Met, trying a new recipe and a new face mask, etc.

  • Mar 20

    Quote from Cat365
    Well we are a boring lot. I called in when my dog died. Actually I sat on the couch crying and shaking for two days. He was my best friend for 14 years.
    I called in sick when my dog died, too. He was a member of my family. So I called in for "death in the family."

  • Mar 20

    Well we are a boring lot. I called in when my dog died. Actually I sat on the couch crying and shaking for two days. He was my best friend for 14 years.

  • Mar 20

    Quote from hellohobbit
    I'm very determined in joining AHS and I will not give up.
    I hope AHS will receive more funding in the near future.
    The provincial budget came down on Friday. AHS is getting money for bricks-and-mortar projects but I didn't see much in it for human resources. At the sharp end, we're being wedged into a budget-centred care model via CoAct/Workforce Transformation/Operational Best Practice or whatever they're calling it now. The province is sending a very explicit message to all the various unions whose contracts expire at the end of the month that there won't be any new money so don't look for any improvements in those collective agreements. But for the first time in recent memory, those unions will have the right to strike. It's not a good time to work in health care in Alberta.

  • Mar 20

    could be one of the excipients in the brand that particular place uses ... becasue 70 % isoporpyl alchol ( with out withoutr2 % chlorhexidine) alone is a thing watery liquid , but most sanitisers have some kkind of additive to make it thicker ...

    sometimes washing properly can be useful even if you don't explicitly need to ( i.e. could use just sanistiser)

  • Mar 20

    Don't be fooled by hand sanitizers- or try to fool your patient inatvertantly! Hand sanitizers are not as effective and last for about 2-3 minutes. Nothing is better than taking the time to do a soap handwash- and it isn't as drying.

  • Mar 20

    Posting =/= there's actually a job opening. Postings are up as per union agreements...whether or not there's funding for the position is a different story. For what it's worth, I work in a medicine unit in Edmonton and we've had no UNE for the past three years.

  • Mar 20

    You won't meet the regency of practice requirements to be licensed if you have not worked as a nurse in 10+ years

  • Mar 19

    I've heard from various sources that AHS isn't hiring any new UNEs (except maybe in mental health). And the UNEs already in the system are being included in baseline staffing... dangerous at any speed, since there's no protection for the UNE at all.


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