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Fiona59 46,800 Views

Joined: Oct 9, '04; Posts: 8,446 (40% Liked) ; Likes: 9,320
from CA
Ten plus year(s) of experience

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  • Feb 23

    After working my twelve hour shifts, sometimes it is all I can do to keep my eyes open on my ten minute bus ride home.

    Just my opinion though!

  • Feb 22

    Quote from flowerpowerntx
    Thank you! Yes, I agree with you 100% and am so glad you wrote this article. For many reasons, breast might not be best. We need to examine those reasons and talk honestly about them. For example, breast feeding is an added stress on mom during a very vulnerable time. And it often times means less sleep as well. Unfortunately, added stress and less sleep for a woman at risk for post-partum depression/psychosis can be a life threatening combination.
    Absolutely! In fact, my PPD didn't alleviate until I stopped breastfeeding. My OB felt it was a likely contributor and thought stopping was worth a try. I wish I could have all that time back during which I was suffering thinking I had to power through. Little did I know that breastfeeding was making my situation worse. We all, baby and husband included, were much more content once the BF stopped. My hormones were all out of whack, and when I stopped, the ship righted itself!

  • Feb 22

    Quote from klone
    Research has shown that women who breastfeed are at less risk for PPD/PPP due to the hormonal effects of lactation.
    If you could point me to that study it would be greatly appreciated.

  • Feb 21

    It does seem extremely harsh for a single med error. What's the organization's policy in terms of corrective discipline? It would be worth exploring this with HR not necessarily to get this job back but to make sure you're considered re-hirable.

  • Feb 21

    I suspect they will just write up a medication error. Was any harm brought to the patient from not getting this med?

    Just learn from your mistakes and remember not to sign off on something before it's given

    Edit: I just realized the title reads "fired", were you actually fired or are you afraid you will be?

  • Feb 21

    I doubt anything major will happen unless you have made multiple mistakes in the past. Were you the one to remember the missed medication or was it found by another nurse?

  • Feb 21

    Quote from GaryRay
    And I beg you not to insult your and my intelligence by saying one disease was chosen and the other wasn't.
    Addiction starts with a choice, however it doesnt stay a choice for very long

    My mum for example is dying of terminal small cell lung carcinoma, exclusively caused by smoking.

    And despite the fact that her addiction is killing her, she still cant give it up

    Dont insult my intelligence by suggesting people should 'just give up their addiction"

    Were it really that easy we could just nix the whole A & D treatment industry

  • Feb 20

    My paycheck, as another poster already noted, and going home at the end of the day.

  • Feb 20
  • Feb 18

    Quote from Sarah2018
    Men are strong and they have bigger lung capacity and they are more powerful than us women yet they refuse to use that physical power.
    It is this attitude which was so prevalent when I first started nursing that means I now have back and neck pain, which has required surgery, and have to take pain killers every day.

    I agree with other posters. You do not know what the team leader is doing and you need to ask for help.
    I have worked with women for 40 years and a) I still don't understand them, and b) I get into trouble for offering help when it is not wanted or needed.

    ASK!!

  • Feb 18

    Quote from Sarah2018
    Hi guys,


    There are are male team leaders(only male) at work who do nothing except sitting and talking and joking with staff( but without helping them) as if they are at a cafe.


    Yesterday and today were heavy for me, and the team leader despite being free and roaming around as if he is on a picnic, did not help. If my patients are calling and I am busy, he just tells me that one patient called and I should see what he wanted.


    Men are strong and they have bigger lung capacity and they are more powerful than us women yet they refuse to use that physical power.


    They don't answer the calling bells from patients or take heavy patients to toilet.


    What is the best way to handle the issue?


    Should I email the charge nurse regarding the issue or tell them to move(they are senior in position to me btw)?
    This is as sexist a remark as I have ever heard on this board.

    This post is totally insulting to men describing male leadership as those who do nothing at work but sit, talk and joke. Then you think it's your place to "tell them to move".

    This thread is asking for trouble.

  • Feb 18

    Quote from Sarah2018
    There are are male team leaders(only male) at work who do nothing except sitting and talking and joking with staff( but without helping them) as if they are at a cafe.
    Quote from Sarah2018
    They don't answer the calling bells from patients or take heavy patients to toilet.
    Quote from Sarah2018
    Should I email the charge nurse regarding the issue or tell them to move (they are senior in position to me btw)?
    First of all, the title of this thread and the first paragraph makes it sound like laziness is a uniquely male trait. It's not. It's not men who aren't helpful, you have a complaint regarding a specific coworker. I don't think gender ought to be the focus here.

    Since you mention having a charge nurse, I have to ask what a team leader is? What's that person's role/responsibilities? Are they expected to answer call bells and toilet patients? (Where I work we don't have as many tiers in the nursing "chain of command").

    I echo chare's question; did you ask for help?

    No, I don't think you should email your charge nurse. My answer is the same as the last time you asked how to handle a perceived problem with your team leader. I suggest you talk to him directly. Ask him for help if you have a heavy patient or have to deal with a task/situation that requires two persons to perform in a safe manner. I'm referring to safety for either the patient or staff. To minimize the risk for/prevent injury to either party, some situations are best handled by two or more members of staff. Regardless of gender.

    Quote from Sarah2018
    Men are strong and they have bigger lung capacity and they are more powerful than us women yet they refuse to use that physical power.
    I find the notion of male nurses as super heroes or knights in shining armor, blessed with amazing lung capacity (!?) and impressive physical powers and tasked with running to the rescue of the little lady nurses a bit amusing and slightly alien. Perhaps it's a cultural thing, but that's not how I view my male coworkers.

    However, there's a difference between expecting that men do the heavy lifting just because they're male and the expectation that every member of staff behave in a collegial manner. The latter I do expect. We should help each other out.

    Short answer; just talk to your coworker. That should in my opinion always be the first step in the vast majority of situations when some sort of conflict or problem exists. Communicate when you feel overwhelmed and ask for help.

    Best wishes!

  • Feb 18

    Did you per chance ask for help? If not, you might consider this the next time. Also, you really have no idea what he might be doing when you think he is "at a cafe."

    And, as a male nurse, I find this somewhat offensive. It has been my experience, after 20 years as a nurse that this behavior, if he is truly not helpful, applies to nurses of all genders.

  • Feb 18

    Quote from Sour Lemon
    I am also baffled. If it's about health and numbers, you could justify this type of service for almost any type of crime.
    Let me give you keys and directions to my home so you can rob it. I'll let you know when I'll be out so we don't encounter each other, because that could be unsafe for us both. I'll tell you where I keep my valuables, too ...so you don't have to ransack the house and destroy the stuff you're not interested in taking. Oh! And I'll lock up my dog because he might bite you and the wound could get infected. That would be just awful.
    I'm so glad I won't have to pay to change my locks, or replace my front door, or replace my broken windows. It's a win-win!
    There are some pamphlets about turning your life around set out on the kitchen table. No pressure, though!
    This is another example of the basic conflict between substance abuse as an illness vs. substance abuse as a crime. The official position of the healthcare community around the world, inc. the US, is that it's an illness. Not to mention the fact that we've been treating it as a crime for generations now in the US, and are getting exactly nowhere with that. But keep on feeling superior and outraged about any attempts to mitigate the harm and treat the illness.

  • Feb 18

    This is as good a quote as any to illustrate why I am against the whole idea; forcing people into recovery doesn't work because it is pointless unless the person wants to recover, I speak from personal experience. Making it easier to do your drug of choice with less risk is called enabling, and delays treatment.
    Person A over doses on the streets, spends weeks in an ICU, then moved down to a floor bed, then discharged, then the cycle is repeated.

    Person B over doses at the site, is able to get help then and there. MAYBE spends one night in the hospital. Oh, and also doesn't spread HIV or any other disease because he or she used a clean needle. Visits the site a few times, notices that there are resources and support services....because that is the point of this service.

    I am baffled that America is so behind, when usually they are the "leaders?" Hmm...


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