Content That Fiona59 Likes

Fiona59 41,178 Views

Joined Oct 9, '04. She has 'Ten plus' year(s) of experience. Posts: 8,244 (39% Liked) Likes: 8,812

Sorted By Last Like Given (Max 500)
  • Jun 26

    I'm not in Canada but I think the hiring process is pretty much the same. If you did this on my unit my manager would politely take your resume and have you escorted off the unit. Then she would have HR flag your application as Do Not Hire.

    This might have worked years ago but in today's world of patient privacy and safety anybody who tries this would be seen as crossing boundaries that should not be crossed. Not only that but most managers are on a tight schedule and would see it as a serious breach of courtesy to just show up. Unless you are directly invited by the manager to do this I would refrain.

  • Jun 25

    Right now our unit doesn't even HAVE a manager. Both the PCM and the unit manager left within 10 days of each other. We're being overseen by a PCM with 4 other units on her portfolio and an assistant head nurse who has taken on some of the UM's work. Our unit is also not one of the ones that entertains students, other than observation-only days (more like 6 hours). Those fortunate few who have done their senior practicum on our unit have no problem getting a job with us, but of course, their application will have that senior practicum included. I don't know of anyone who has ever been hired onto the unit by presenting their resumé to the PCM/UM in person. To be honest, even when we HAD a manager, I couldn't have told you where to find her.

  • Jun 25

    Does your employer require you to answer your phone on your scheduled days off? If not, then simply do NOT answer. I'm sure you have a smartphone where you can send them to voicemail or simply block them on your days off and unblock the night before you're due to return. Trust me, they will get the message. Did you get the no weekends or calling you on your days off in writing? If not, then you might have a problem. Never trust what anyone promises or says off the grid. If it is not in writing it quickly becomes non memorable or worse.......true! Good luck

  • Jun 25

    In a hospital, one can sometimes work registry/PRN and get away with not working weekends. Maybe that's what she's doing.

  • Jun 25

    Where the heck do you work that you're allowed to just bow out of working weekends, while others can't??? I've never in my life encountered this in an acute care setting.

    My surprise with that situation aside, that is super annoying that they keep calling and are trying not to take no for an answer. This says to me that the unit is chronically understaffed, which is a bad situation. I guess all you can do is keep sticking to your guns.

  • Jun 25

    I never answer the phone when staffing calls me. They can leave a message and I will call back if I'm interested. Co-workers will also stop asking you for favors if you never say yes. Beware that they're not likely to do you favors either, though.
    My first job as a new graduate was a chronically short staffed hospital. They actually kept calling and asking me to work for months after I'd resigned and moved to another state.

  • Jun 25

    I think it's unusual you got hired to not work weekends when all your coworkers do. Do you work in a hospital setting?

  • Jun 25

    Quote from Open mind
    I was wondering as a new graduate, my prior work experience is all in night clubs… How can I use that to my benefit in an interview any suggestions
    Expert in customer service.

  • Jun 25

    Quote from Bamafan2011
    It didn't say for him to remove foley until he sees the urologist to help examine the urine.
    Then you're fine. If he is supposed to leave it in, then no need for a syringe to remove it.

  • Jun 25

    Did the discharge teaching include Foley removal that would even necessitate this consideration? I have only worked in the ED and when we send people home with a Foley, it's typically with the understanding that they have urology follow-up and the Foley should stay in. If I give them instructions on Foley removal, that would obviously be a different scenario.

  • Jun 25

    My son-in-law was recently released from the hospital with a Foley after surgery. Luckily both my son and I are nurses so D/C'ing the catheter was no big deal, but I don't think it's wise to leave it in and expect the patient or family member to pull it at home.

  • Jun 25

    You actually don't need a syringe to DC a Foley. A scissors can be used to cut the port that the syringe would attach to inflate the balloon with water. The water from the balloon then just leaks out and the balloon deflates.

    What I don't understand is that you expect the patient to remove his own Foley. The normal procedure would be for the patient to return to the doctors office to be reevaluated and have the Foley removed at that time.

  • Jun 24

    I'm on vacation. I left a note on the schedule not to call me between date A &B. They called two days into my vacation. I contacted a coworker to put the note BACK on the schedule that someone had removed, because, obviously, they didn't get my point!

    Don't ever feel guilty about not calling back, or for not answering when they call. I tell people all the time "This is my job, not my life."

    Also, I get mad when people call me in the middle of the day if I'm sleeping; how about I call you in the middle of the night to see if you want to work? OH WAIT, you're already on the schedule, SORRY to wake you!

  • Jun 24

    Quote from kp2016
    If they are demanding that you call them back it is in your best interests to do so. Obviously once you are on the phone they plan to try and guilt/ pressure you into accepting the shift. Be ready to politely and firm restate "I am unavailable".
    I really don't think OP should feel obligated to do that unless OP was on call. If you're not on call, employers should respect time off. OP could always say something like "I was unable to return your call because I was sleeping....or at a movie....or just don't have my phone by me at every waking moment." Or if OP is as snarky as I can sometimes be, say something like "oh I didn't know I had signed paperwork indicated I was accepting an on call position!"

  • Jun 24

    Quote from kp2016
    If they are demanding that you call them back it is in your best interests to do so..
    I completely disagree. IMO, my personal time is my own and I owe my employer nothing when I'm off the clock.


close