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Fiona59 38,083 Views

Joined Oct 9, '04. She has 'Ten plus' year(s) of experience. Posts: 8,102 (39% Liked) Likes: 8,643

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  • Dec 8

    I'm curious, where's the evidence that the nurses in the nurses' station were laughing at the applicant?

  • Dec 4

    Dude, you seem to be perseverating on bullying and nurses "eating their young." I just looked at all the threads on the subject you have started.

    Who hurt you?

  • Dec 4

    AA folks (the other AA) talk a lot about "stinkin' thinkin'". It refers to the phenomenon of self-sabotage by means of unrealistic expectations, inaccurate assumptions and dishonesty with oneself.

    In this case, labelling everyone who has an opinion you don't like a "bully" neatly lets you off the hook of responsibility for your own assumptions and behavior. The payoff is, since you don't get to control others' perceptions, thoughts or behavior, you've bought yourself an endless supply of tea and sympathy, not to mention people telling you how awesome you are.

    Enjoy!

  • Dec 4

    Quote from Dianna11
    Those who put down posters, based on how long they have been on AN , or for any other reasons...

    Did it ever occur to you that people come here to vent/ask questions???most don't care to please trolls, they are here to communicate and get helpful feedback, not nasty posts .

    I came into this field because I love helping ppl. I honestly hope that none of those nasty nurses will attend to me or to my loved ones. It's scary.
    Responses are what they are. Nasty/helpful is in the mind of the reader.

    One of those down to earth nasty nurses may save your life one day. You will then be grateful that your nurse was more focused on saving your life than on being politically correct. In spite of your stated preferences.

  • Dec 4

    No one on this internet site (or any other) is "real" enough to me to cause me any distress. I'm human and can get irritated just like anyone else, but I don't ever feel bullied in situations where I can simply log off.

  • Dec 4

    If this site is bothering you, don't visit it.

  • Dec 3

    Quote from AnnieOaklyRN
    The patient is probably an alcoholic and is not interested in stopping. It's Ativan or Whiskey, both MAY interact with medications, but since the patient may seize without either you have to pick your poison.

    Annie
    I agree. Like many of us, I have had more alcoholics than I care to remember. Currently, the approach in favor is to detox ALL of them using benzos and (hopefully) prevent seizures. There is also a prevailing sense of urgency among the nurses and the doctors to discharge them ASAP before the magic 3rd day where severe withdrawal tends to occur. I for one just don't get it. We know the vast majority of these folks aren't going to quit drinking, so why even try? It makes much more sense to me to keep withdrawal at bay with the poison they came in with, address their other medical problems and discharge them back to their lives without try to be virtuous and detox them. Unless of course the patient expresses the wish to attempt detoxing.

  • Dec 3

    Even if the patient is not an alcoholic, a cocktail or a glass of wine isn't necessarily inappropriate. Why do people lose their right to enjoy a favorite beverage simply because they are in assisted living or even a nursing home? Assuming it's not going to harm the patient, what exactly is the problem here? Nowhere is it stated that the nurse has an order to get the patient hammered.

  • Dec 3

    If you have an order then give it. If I am stuck in a nursing home I want whiskey and dilaudid please. A little peace is a good thing. Seriously though, if that is their normal thing it is best to not make them endure DT's which is very dangerous.

  • Dec 3

    The patient is probably an alcoholic and is not interested in stopping. It's Ativan or Whiskey, both MAY interact with medications, but since the patient may seize without either you have to pick your poison.

    Annie

  • Dec 3

    Quote from purplegal
    It doesn't seem right as part of my nursing duties to be giving patients alcohol.
    This sounds like it is loaded with more than a little bit of judgment. Is that the case? If it's determined to be of therapeutic benefit and no danger (do assure yourself of that), why would you feel that way?

  • Dec 3

    This used to be common, then went away, now is making a comeback. Would you rather deal with a combative, belligerent, paranoid, agitated, seizing DT patient or the hassle of giving someone a drink of whiskey?

  • Dec 3

    Quote from purplegal
    Apparently, we are to give him whiskey along with his evening medications. This worries me since alcohol interacts with so many medications.
    If you're uncertain why the whiskey was ordered you can always ask the prescriber for clarification. I'd treat it the same way as I would a more traditional order; i.e. get clarification if something is unclear. If you are concerned with medication interactions I think that a pharmacist is a good resource if you have one available to you. Personally I wouldn't be worried about one drink but if you need to have your mind put at ease, definitely reach out. After all, I don't know your patient's history or current status or medications, so I'm just speaking in general terms.

    It doesn't seem right as part of my nursing duties to be giving patients alcohol.
    If it's somehow beneficial for the patient (either by preventing him/her from developing alcohol withdrawal or simply by providing some culinary enjoyment ), do you still feel that it shouldn't be a part of your job?

    A couple of years ago I visited an old classmate who works hospice at her place of work. I noticed that they had an actual wine refrigerator in the kitchen (dual zone for red and white) and she told me that wine was served with dinner for those residents who wanted it. Served in real wine glasses. In my opinion at least half the therapeutic value is lost if you serve wine in a cup, mug or any other kind of wholly inappropriate vessel

  • Dec 3

    Quote from purplegal
    Also, for those that have given alcohol to your patients, have you given it with the meds? Or spread it out?
    i have seen it just given with their HS meds

  • Dec 3

    I'll have to talk to my kids. If I end up in the rest home, make sure I get my before dinner glass of wine, or two...


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