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rynophiliac 1,828 Views

Joined Jun 5, '11. Posts: 28 (36% Liked) Likes: 32

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  • Jul 30

    Quote from nursegirl2001
    rynophiliac

    I too am in a position where I do not have to work, however .... I am not in the mindset to rush through such a serious aspect of clinical healthcare performance and services. Think about it for a minute, doctors have to go to school for a lot longer than NPs so how can we even offer accelerated programs under 2 years that actually prove effective in the clinical setting?? ... .As other posters have commented I would not want a practitioner who has rushed through a program and is treating me because I cannot help but wonder and associate this behavior/attitude with potential for the same disposition in the professional setting. NP is a serious job and responsibility that requires rigorous study:icon_roll..........hurried education will most likely equal hurried (potentially detrimental and incompetent) results.....
    I want to get through school as well but I want to be competent and knowledgeable as a provider but I need adequate TIME to learn the material to be able to do so effectively..... ...
    Nursegirl, I'm not sure if you read through the entire thread or not but we have already covered this. This thread is not about how about how effective accelerated FNP programs are in preparing their graduates for clinical practice, it is to identify which accelerated programs are out there so potential students can do further research into each program.

  • Jul 30

    I knew when I posted this that I would get many posts from people assuming that I don't care about the quality of the education but that is not true. The two schools that I mentioned Vanderbilt and Georgetown (which are both very short programs) have an excellent reputation for quality! Why do people just assume that because the program is short it is not any good?

    Many RNs complete their FNP in 2 1/2-3 years while working full time. I am in a position where I do not have to work at all and would like to only focus on school so why wouldn't I be able to complete a program in 1 1/2 years? Makes perfect sense to me.

    Anyways... lets get back to the original question, Does anyone out here know of any short FNP programs? If you do please list them because I would like to do some further research about them. And just an FYI, one of the things I want to research is quality

  • Jul 25

    I knew when I posted this that I would get many posts from people assuming that I don't care about the quality of the education but that is not true. The two schools that I mentioned Vanderbilt and Georgetown (which are both very short programs) have an excellent reputation for quality! Why do people just assume that because the program is short it is not any good?

    Many RNs complete their FNP in 2 1/2-3 years while working full time. I am in a position where I do not have to work at all and would like to only focus on school so why wouldn't I be able to complete a program in 1 1/2 years? Makes perfect sense to me.

    Anyways... lets get back to the original question, Does anyone out here know of any short FNP programs? If you do please list them because I would like to do some further research about them. And just an FYI, one of the things I want to research is quality

  • Jul 14

    Quote from LetsChill
    Vanderbilt's FNP program is indeed 12 months. However, you need to already have a BSN. If you don't, they have an accelerated BSN program available. Also, it is more pricey, at nearly $1200 per credit hour.

    But it is one of the top MSN schools in the country. I'm going there for that reason, and because I can get an ACNP with a sub-specialty in cardiology. Few programs have sub-specialties and none for acute cardiology.

    Good luck.
    I would really like to see some more NP programs offer subspecialties. This is where the med students have us beat, they get to do a residency and learn their specialty as part of their training. I really want to do rheumatology, to my knowledge their aren't any FNP programs that offer additional training in rheumatology. I am planning on taking additional courses with the American College of Rheumatology for NP's and PA's at my own expense but it would be nice to have a subspecialty type program that would include it.

  • Jul 5

    Quote from hey_suz
    I'm a bit jealous that you don't have to work while in school! That will be nice, to just be able to focus on studying.
    It is very nice, the secret is to keep your bills low, don't buy a big house and new car, etc. I will still be working one 16 hour shift on Saturday but that's it, and I think I can handle an accelerated FNP program while working one day a week. If I have to drop the saturday too I will but it will be nice to have some income coming in to cover living expenses.

  • Jun 7

    Quote from nursegirl2001
    rynophiliac

    I too am in a position where I do not have to work, however .... I am not in the mindset to rush through such a serious aspect of clinical healthcare performance and services. Think about it for a minute, doctors have to go to school for a lot longer than NPs so how can we even offer accelerated programs under 2 years that actually prove effective in the clinical setting?? ... .As other posters have commented I would not want a practitioner who has rushed through a program and is treating me because I cannot help but wonder and associate this behavior/attitude with potential for the same disposition in the professional setting. NP is a serious job and responsibility that requires rigorous study:icon_roll..........hurried education will most likely equal hurried (potentially detrimental and incompetent) results.....
    I want to get through school as well but I want to be competent and knowledgeable as a provider but I need adequate TIME to learn the material to be able to do so effectively..... ...
    Nursegirl, I'm not sure if you read through the entire thread or not but we have already covered this. This thread is not about how about how effective accelerated FNP programs are in preparing their graduates for clinical practice, it is to identify which accelerated programs are out there so potential students can do further research into each program.

  • Jun 7

    I knew when I posted this that I would get many posts from people assuming that I don't care about the quality of the education but that is not true. The two schools that I mentioned Vanderbilt and Georgetown (which are both very short programs) have an excellent reputation for quality! Why do people just assume that because the program is short it is not any good?

    Many RNs complete their FNP in 2 1/2-3 years while working full time. I am in a position where I do not have to work at all and would like to only focus on school so why wouldn't I be able to complete a program in 1 1/2 years? Makes perfect sense to me.

    Anyways... lets get back to the original question, Does anyone out here know of any short FNP programs? If you do please list them because I would like to do some further research about them. And just an FYI, one of the things I want to research is quality

  • Apr 27

    I knew when I posted this that I would get many posts from people assuming that I don't care about the quality of the education but that is not true. The two schools that I mentioned Vanderbilt and Georgetown (which are both very short programs) have an excellent reputation for quality! Why do people just assume that because the program is short it is not any good?

    Many RNs complete their FNP in 2 1/2-3 years while working full time. I am in a position where I do not have to work at all and would like to only focus on school so why wouldn't I be able to complete a program in 1 1/2 years? Makes perfect sense to me.

    Anyways... lets get back to the original question, Does anyone out here know of any short FNP programs? If you do please list them because I would like to do some further research about them. And just an FYI, one of the things I want to research is quality

  • Jan 24

    Quote from hey_suz
    I'm a bit jealous that you don't have to work while in school! That will be nice, to just be able to focus on studying.
    It is very nice, the secret is to keep your bills low, don't buy a big house and new car, etc. I will still be working one 16 hour shift on Saturday but that's it, and I think I can handle an accelerated FNP program while working one day a week. If I have to drop the saturday too I will but it will be nice to have some income coming in to cover living expenses.

  • Dec 16 '15

    I knew when I posted this that I would get many posts from people assuming that I don't care about the quality of the education but that is not true. The two schools that I mentioned Vanderbilt and Georgetown (which are both very short programs) have an excellent reputation for quality! Why do people just assume that because the program is short it is not any good?

    Many RNs complete their FNP in 2 1/2-3 years while working full time. I am in a position where I do not have to work at all and would like to only focus on school so why wouldn't I be able to complete a program in 1 1/2 years? Makes perfect sense to me.

    Anyways... lets get back to the original question, Does anyone out here know of any short FNP programs? If you do please list them because I would like to do some further research about them. And just an FYI, one of the things I want to research is quality



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