Latest Comments by Lev <3

Lev <3, BSN, RN 53,445 Views

Joined: Jun 3, '11; Posts: 2,900 (53% Liked) ; Likes: 5,359

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  • 1
    Brian S. likes this.

    Use your rapid response team!

  • 1
    Brian S. likes this.

    Don't ever be afraid to question; whether it's an order, a med, a doctor, a patient, or a fellow nurse!

  • 2
    Kitiger and Brian S. like this.

    To pop out those veins: dangle the arm, use heat, and place tourniquet above and below the vein.

  • 1
    Brian S. likes this.

    If you feel that something's wrong, it's probably not right...trust your gut and investigate.

  • 3

    You seen a pen for those patients to sign those discharge papers and hopefully never come back!

  • 2
    Kitiger and Davey Do like this.

    When Your Patient Is Mentally Galaxies Away.

  • 1
    Davey Do likes this.

    When Your Psych Patient Thinks He's A Superhero.

  • 2
    Joe V and Davey Do like this.

    Shower, shower, shower! Where's the shower?

  • 0

    My manager testing out my "call bell response time.*

  • 1
    smiley.RN likes this.

    Family members who want to be served.

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  • 0

    Are you working for an agency?

  • 0

    In an emergency situation in a patient without an advanced airway a non rebreather is the first choice unless the patient is not really breathing which in case you use an ambu bag. An oxygen saturation of 56% is bad for anyone, COPD or not.

    If there is a rapid response team this would be the time to call and then notify the MD.

  • 2
    acueto82 and acueto like this.

    Quote from gjl5148


    Critical Thinking Questions


    1. S.G. is a 70 year old male who has just had abdominal surgery. He is NPO and has an IV of D5RL infusing at 100 cc/hr. You enter the room and notice the IV has stopped running. The patient has poor skin turgor and is hypotensive. The patient tells you the IV is hurting him. Answer the following questions.


    1. What could be the problem?
    2. What should you assess?
    3. What should you do?
    4. What would be a nursing diagnosis for this patient?
    Yes, skin turgor is an indication of dehydration. This patient is also hypotensive. What could be a bigger issue here? The IV is not running (presumably it is still hooked up) and the site hurts. What can be going on? Also, what type of fluid is D5LR and what is its affect on fluid status? Think about abdominal surgery..what is the colon full of?


    Quote from gjl5148
    1. J.D. is a 48 year old female 2 days post-op abdominal surgery. She has a foley to gravity drainage. While assessing J.D.'s vital signs at 12 noon, you note that there is no urine in the tubing and there is only a little in the bag.

    The patient tells you "I am in pain and I feel like I need to urinate." Answer the following questions.

    1. What could be the problem?
    2. What should you assess?
    3. What should you do?
    4. What could be a nursing diagnosis for this patient?
    There are multiple issues that may be in play. There is a foley present. What is a foley catheter a risk factor for? Why do we want to get foleys out stat, especially after surgery? What could the pain be from? Also, there is just a little drainage in the catheter. How is the patient's fluid status? Is there an obstruction somewhere? What does the bladder scan show?

    Quote from gjl5148
    1. A patient is admitted with complaint of shortness of breath, chronic cough with small amounts of sputum, loss of appetite and fatigue. He states that these symptoms have become worse within the last 2 months. He is 40 years old and smokes cigarettes. Answer the following questions?


    1. What could be the problem?
    2. What should you assess?
    3. What should you do?
    4. What could be a nursing diagnosis for this patient?
    Smokers are at increased risk for many conditions including chronic respiratory conditions and cardiac conditions. Remember to stick to nursing diagnoses and not be tempted to use a medical diagnosis.

  • 0

    Do you have access to the lab results? How did the patient's troponin look? If he patient had a heart attack, that could be contributing to some of the heart failure. Is the patient on a beta blocker? That could mask compensatory tachycardia. The low SpO2, shortness of breath, and edema sounds like the right focus for this care plan. How is the patient's activity tolerance? It wouldn't be a priority diagnosis but can be an AEB statement if the patient is weak.


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