Content That Lev <3 Likes

Lev <3, BSN, RN 51,106 Views

Joined Jun 3, '11. Lev <3 is a ED Registered Nurse. She has '5' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Emergency - CEN'. Posts: 2,879 (53% Liked) Likes: 5,326

Sorted By Last Like Given (Max 500)
  • Jan 19

    I am also an observant Jew and haven't had a problem with my job accommodating me, although I know I am lucky in this regard. I also work with Seventh Day Adventists who have Saturday off, and the facility accommodates them as well. I think the problem with the job you applied for, is that their requirements are Friday night and Saturday night, neither of which you can help them with. In my facility, the requirements are Saturday night and Sunday night and I work EVERY Sunday night. They have a per diem worker who covers Saturday night on my weekend. As Nurth Beth said, the facility might feel it would make scheduling too complicated and if they have other qualified candidates, why should they go out of their way to accommodate you. I don't think that should be classified as religious discrimination. That being said, there are places that will make the effort and it's not necessarily difficult to have per diem workers cover the missing shift.

    And just for the record, being a religious Jew is not similar to preferring to watch football on a Sunday. I speak for myself when I say that as a religous Jew, I will never work on Saturday even if I couldn't find a single hospital job that would accommodate me. I would find a M-F job as Nurse Beth said. Religion is not something I compromise on for convenience.

  • Jan 6

    But the real question is... what does it taste like?

    It smells not delicious. Toxic.

  • Jan 6

    Quote from Davey Do
    Davey you are a sick man.

    --From the allnurses user who was tempted to write: "He'll take care of the placenta for ya!"

  • Jan 6
  • Jan 4

    I have had patients very insistent about wanting to know my religion and/or political opinion. I always decline to answer. I have had to get rather emphatic once or twice. I am not offended, just not inclined to engage in being recruited and don't find debate to be a good use of my time. There isn't really any other reason someone would want that information as far as I am concerned.

  • Jan 4

    Quote from applewhitern
    I don't like it when a patient or family member asks me, "how long have you worked here?" Its never "how long have you been a nurse," but "how long have you worked HERE?" Or "where do you live?" "You'll be getting off at such-and-such a time." They don't know when I'll be getting off work, and they sure don't need to know where I live! I guess I'm just sensitive; it makes me feel like a factory worker punching a time clock instead of a degreed professional.
    I think you are reading WAY too much into this- it seems to me like small talk. Nothing more. Nothing less.

  • Jan 4

    A few months ago, a patient asked me if I was married. I replied: No, I am divorced. She then went on to ask if I had children, and again, I replied: No. So the next thing out of her mouth was: Is that why you are divorced, because you don't have children?

    I said: No. I'm divorced because you should love the person you are married to.

    She responded: Why did you marry him? Were you drunk?

    I smiled ever so sweetly at her, looked her in the eye and replied: I must have been!

    End of conversation.

  • Jan 4

    I had a patient ask me if I was happy with my fiance. He then proceeded to tell me I knew where to find him if it didn't work out.

    In all fairness, I ask about bowel habits and passing gas in detail all day every day so maybe it's karma.

  • Jan 4

    Quote from ICUman
    With all the expenses lost in replacing burnt out nurses, fines for hospital acquired pressure ulcers, medication errors, and everything else listed above, etc., how come hospitals haven't realized reducing nurse to patient ratios will actually *save* the hospital money?

    Is it more expensive really just to hire a few extra nurses? All the hospital scores and safety numbers would rise, including HCAHPS.

    It would be a win-win for everyone. What am I missing?
    You would think so, but these hospitals are too short-sighted.

    And let's be honest, the nurses are not really breaking any budget for what they pay us versus what they charge and receive from the insurance companies.

  • Jan 4

    Amen.

    I work med-surg contingent and one of the reasons I left full-time was because of the unsafe staffing. One night, we had a full house (26 patients), one sitter case, four nurses and one tech (the other had to leave mid-shift). I was left stranded watching a patient while I had seven other patients who needed me. I had to call the house supervisor. I was LIVID.

    Another nurse (who has since left) told me one time (and this was the worst night ever), she had a full house, was charge and there was only one other nurse and aid. You bet that she went to management the next day.

    And then there was the time that one nurse refused to take on a seventh patient and the charge nurse, who already had seven patients himself, had to take an eighth one.

    Needless to say, our patient approval ratings are in the toilet and the turnover is ridiculous. The only reason I bother staying is to keep my skills up, the $$$ and pension and the people. If it weren't for the retirement and coworkers, I would've left already.

  • Jan 4

    Quote from ROSE BSN
    Staffing ratios are a must., but it must include other areas such as long term care. I would like to hear what everyone's opinion is for appropriate ratios for long term care, assisted living, and rehabilitation,
    I just resigned from my LTC/SNF job because of this. One nurse with up to 40 resident patients is just not safe but it is the industry norm. I had patients that needed individual attention, I had order changes coming in, doctor communications to deal with, questions and calls from patient families...all while I was trying to care for the increasingly medically needy residents. Safe ratio would be a limit of maybe 20 residents per nurse but I am sure that the LTC corporation lobby is hoping for less ratio regulation.

  • Jan 4

    Quote from Been there,done that
    You love that job?
    Lol, maybe I just am happy to finally be a nurse and don't know any better. I do love how my coworkers pull together and help each other out.

  • Jan 4

    Quote from ICUman
    With all the expenses lost in replacing burnt out nurses, fines for hospital acquired pressure ulcers, medication errors, and everything else listed above, etc., how come hospitals haven't realized reducing nurse to patient ratios will actually *save* the hospital money?

    Is it more expensive really just to hire a few extra nurses? All the hospital scores and safety numbers would rise, including HCAHPS.

    It would be a win-win for everyone. What am I missing?
    The bean counters will not "just hire more nurses. "It cuts into the bottom line. Patients are expendable. Plenty more where they came from.

  • Jan 4

    And let's not forget the nursing assistants. If we get these types of ratios, they'll cut the NAs and we'll be responsible for total care. With the acuity levels we see, that's neither safe nor reasonable.

  • Jan 4

    Just reading this sounds like a dream come true. I would LOVE to have a 1:4 ratio! What good care I could give my patients...

    I work on an oncology/telemetry unit. We have 1:6 ratios and as a 1st year nurse I can tell you I can constantly overwhelmed. I have taken a lunch break 2x in my 7 months (both times cut short by calls from the floor). Everyone is expected to eat at their desk while charting (and not let patients see of course). I usually only get to go pee 1 or 2x in 12 hours.

    I love my job and my floor, but we need more nurses and a lower ratio, for safety's sake.


close