Content That Lev <3 Likes

Content That Lev <3 Likes

Lev <3, BSN, RN 39,155 Views

Joined Jun 3, '11 - from 'Another planet'. Lev <3 is a ED Registered Nurse. She has 'A few' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Emergency Department & Upstairs'. Posts: 2,435 (52% Liked) Likes: 4,488

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  • 12:15 pm

    If they did something serious and it has been dealt with then that's that. No it is none of your business. If you are a prospective employer doing a background check,sure. A nosy coworker, no.

  • Jun 19

    Quote from jadelpn
    "I will get my charge nurse to come and see you immediately". And do so.

    Being stuck 8 times is wearing even with the most mild mannered person. And yes, it would be very frustrating to most people, Unfortuntely, you were the brunt of that anxiety/anger. I will tell you not to take any of it personally. It seems to me it was the situation, and not you as a person or a nurse. Going forward, just simply say you will get your charge. Let her/him smooth feathers and perhaps come up with a plan "b".
    I think OP meant the patient was scheduled 8 iv MEDICATIONS... Not that he was stuck 8 times.

  • Jun 19

    The agency needs to be notified so they can set appropriate limits/expectations with the parent. It is possible that other nurses in the home are doing it and not informing the agency since some people working in PDN have, shall we say, boundary issues. When I was a manager in pediatric home care (not PDN), my colleague who managed our PDN population often found out that similar things had been going on for a long time when a new nurse went into a home and reported it. The parent then would come back and say "well all our other nurses do it." This needs to stop and is not appropriate. A parent bringing the child with her to the bathroom is one thing. A nurse doing it is something completely different.

  • Jun 19

    If the parent is home, is there a reason why the parent can't step in for 5 minutes while you use the bathroom?

    Or, in the case of a day shift (to your manager): "The parent has asked that the child not be left alone for a moment and is unable and unwilling to even stay with the child should I need to use the restroom. The parent has asked me to bring the child in the restroom with me. I am unable and unwilling to do that. Perhaps there needs to be a CNA in house during the day to assist with the care of this child."

  • Jun 16

    I have worked in many facilities over the years. I have HEARD that self reporting SHOULD be blameless and is designed to identify the root cause of the error.

    Unless the error caused harm to the patient.. I will keep MY mouth shut. It would be all up to my immediate manager to use it against me or not. Most of them would.

  • Jun 16

    One place I see people fumble is with the monitor. Any time I am in a new ER with an unfamiliar monitor, I download the manual and read it. I was soooooo happy to see Lifepaks in my current place!

    Become an expert — know the code cart drawers in and out, know the meds, know the monitor, know the ACLS algorithms.

  • Jun 15

    Quote from psu_213
    The student replies to me "well, how about a real report."


    Wow. WOW. When I was in school, I had to go to the unit the night before and research my patient and was expected to know all about them, including their scheduled meds, by the time I arrived bright and early 1 hour before shift change. The *only* exception to this was L&D.

    Interesting. Things sure have changed.

  • Jun 15

    First, I have never witness a nurse being mean (patronizing, etc.) to a nursing student--even if said student was not up to standard.

    It does go both ways. I got to work, got report on my patients. Started the routine of assessing/medicating my patients. A group of students strolled onto the unit at 0755. One came up to me and said "I have Mrs. Smith in room 2" (name changed to protect the innocent). I replied "OK, well she has a history of A fib. She is here after cardioversion." The student replies to me "well, how about a real report." I wanted to tell her "well, that happened an hour ago," but I held my tongue and did give her more of a report. (I don't know about anyone else, but when I was in school, we always arrived before shift change and listened to report...that does not seem to be the standard now.)

    Yes, it's a shame that nurses aren't always appropriate in their treatment of students; however, it can be a stressful experience for an overworked nurse to have a student come to him/her and demand that the nurse stop everything to "explain stuff" when other things need to be completed ASAP.

  • Jun 15

    They are busy and your teacher should teach.

  • Jun 15

    Being responsible for a student nurse is sometimes considered "extra work" by the nurses. If they have heavy assignments and/or their pt's status is very unstable, they won't have time to guide and explain every little steps to the student. Don't take offense when they refuse a student nurse. They don't get paid extra for taking a student.
    And for your own good, cut off the accusatory tone and attitude in the future.

  • Jun 15

    First of all I suggest you do a search of this site. This question has been asked many times before and there are some particularly good threads with very comprehensive answers to you question. Secondly, I suggest you re-read your post and find the extremely inflammatory and rude sentence that is going to get you burned to a crisp when more people respond. Or get your flame-proof undies on because it's going to get real for you very fast.

  • Jun 15
  • Jun 15

    Quote from hherrn
    Hey ER nurses:

    Please quit suggesting people come down and see what we actually do. Last thing I need is somebody looking over my shoulder while I surf the web as my patients deteriorate. I am mostly sitting around eating bon bons until the floor takes report. Once word gets out, there is going to be one heck of a lot more competition for ER jobs.


    As far as nurses from other departments being critical of lazy incompetent ER nurses:

    Where else are we supposed to work? We aren't smart enough for the ICU, not hard working enough for the floor, and not compassionate enough for long term care.

    Be happy we are down in the ER and not mucking things up in your unit.
    ^^best post ever

  • Jun 15

    Quote from ProgressiveActivist
    Go on divert.
    Would you like to come down and call the CNO to tell her that we need to go on divert?? Being in the ED, I'm pretty much immune to silly attacks...however, this one struck a nerve. There are times I would like to go on divert, but, well, census is our friend, or so they say. If you know how to convince the individuals who can say 'divert' to actually say 'divert,' please, let me know!

  • Jun 15

    I can only speak for I would handle this situation personally which would be to talk to the nurse first - Tell them that I suspected they were using or impaired while at work and that they needed to get help immediately or I would turn them into the BON. Then I would be faced with the action of following through. Sure you can stay silent and say "Not my monkey! Not my circus!' but think about how you would feel if a patient or even a co-worker was injured due to this person's addiction. There is a huge "Code of Silence" in our profession with regard to nurses working under the influence. There is also a certain naiveté where in many nurses fail to see or recognize what is happening right in front of them. So it may not be obvious to other nurses that she is "High". Still when the poo hits fan all will claim how betrayed they felt by her actions and nod their heads together claiming they "Just knew something wasn't right about her."

    You make it seem like a forgone conclusion that this nurse and by innuendo that all nurses with substance abuse issues will likely divert. This is not necessarily true , but those who do, get caught (without question) sooner or later. At that point your friend's friend will be forced into a treatment program or be forced to give up her career.

    It's a very sticky situation and you have to use your own judgement in how to proceed. If I were you I would sleep on it and decide what is best. It appears obvious that this friend who is using is not ready to stop on their own. They may need a push in the direction of recovery. If you do make a complaint don't be afraid to put your name on it. Anonymous complaints tend to lack veracity and can be ignored. Be prepared to state what type of drugs she may be using and dates and times when you believe she may have been impaired. This may be enough for someone to call her in for a random UDS. Then let the cards fall where they may with a clean conscience that you have done the right thing.

    Hppy


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