Content That Lev <3 Likes

Content That Lev <3 Likes

Lev <3, BSN, RN 38,586 Views

Joined Jun 3, '11 - from 'Another planet'. Lev <3 is a Registered Nurse. She has '3' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Emergency Department, MedSurg'. Posts: 2,408 (52% Liked) Likes: 4,412

Sorted By Last Like Given (Max 500)
  • 11:10 am

    Sounds like somebody slipped something in her drink.

  • 8:25 am

    Dear AN Posters,

    I wanted to post an update as well as encourage others. I've graduated this year with my ADN!

    Thank you to everyone whose been there for me. I plan to continue to pay it forward by providing advice to others who are on the journey to become a nurse!

    I'm working and happy and NCLEC-RN bound!!!

    Thank you, AN!

  • May 29

    I just started in the ER after about 3.5 years of floor nursing. I've done cardiac, surgical, med/surg, but always wanted to work in the ER. I finally took the plunge and am on orientation now in a very busy ER. I finally have the opportunity to use my brain and don't feel like a glorified waitress and med dispenser the way I felt on the floor. If I could go back, I would have switched to the ER sooner. I look forward to a long career in the specialty and have no regrets.

  • May 29

    Maybe we'll get lucky and all three will have to withdraw. Then we could get a do over.

    **sigh**

    Reality sucks sometimes.

  • May 29

    Quote from Maevish
    I love the military so I can't vote for that b*tch, therefore I'm left with the unappetizing option of Trump, which is oh so sad
    If I am not mistaken you are in California which means your state has not even voted in the primary. If this is the case then vote for BERNIE in the primary to try and prevent a Clinton nomination. The nomination is not yet Clintons no matter what she or the main stream media says. If you take out her super delegates which should not count at this point. If Bernie does very well in the June 7th primaries he could actually be the nominee. He is already polling as a stronger candidate than Clinton against Trump!
    Veterans For Bernie Sanders

  • May 29

    #bernieorbust if Hillary runs against Trump he will win. No matter how nice it is to think that won't happen, it will.

  • May 29

    I was just using open heart as an example since the actual incisions are usually just the sternotomy and a leg site... We still do both legs and the entire torso, up the neck, etc.

    I wasn't picturing a Brazilian type hair removal on Calivianya's patient. I figured they shaved the mons pubis and maybe down to where the labia start to divide. That was our usual move for abdominal cases that had the potential to go open. Much depends on the surgeon, preference, density of hair (can the chloroprep fully reach the skin?) etc. so there's variability in the whole shave/not shave algorithm.

    It truly is a royal pain in the pubes to shave in the OR so I tend to believe that there was a solid reason for the patient's missing pelt.

    Definitely tell them about your toes, hobbit, for any orthopedic procedure or open heart. For ortho we even prep *between* all toes and the bottoms of the feet... There's a whole procedure requiring strong muscles for a total joint circumferential prep that involves the entirety of both legs.

    For what it's worth yes, the majority of the surgeons I worked with were excellent about educating the patient on the possibility of body hair removal when we did the final consent prior to procedure.

    For the record I am a traditional soap and water (or suitable cleanser) girl when providing peri care at the bedside on the floor. I have had to shave many chests for tele leads. One guy asked for a specific pattern in his chest hair. He and his wife had a good laugh about it actually. I would never shave someone on a whim or if it wasn't medically necessary.

  • May 29

    Quote from MomAndSonInMD
    Some people on here have real troubles and should look for other means of employment, hopefully not in copy editing or in fields that involve maturity, such as dealing with the public in the nude. Good luck with your career.
    While the funny bone is not an actual bone, it definitely exists, and you can tell when someone was born without it.

  • May 29

    Quote from MomAndSonInMD
    Some people on here have real troubles and should look for other means of employment, hopefully not in copy editing or in fields that involve maturity, such as dealing with the public in the nude. Good luck with your career.

    This thread is not only funny, but has touched on some ethical issues.
    I think a great sense of humor and laughing at the ridiculousness of stuff can help one through most bad days.
    Good luck with your career.

  • May 29

    Quote from MomAndSonInMD
    I find this juvenile. OP, honestly. How old are you? Using correct grammar would go far in your credibility as well. Edited to add: It is disturbing that a nurse assistant would find it appropriate to have such discussions. I can understand if one genuinely wanted to learn if it was proper procedure, but this just sounds like mockery of a patient, which is not okay and is unprofessional.
    Mocking a particular patient is unprofessional. Noting common trends of annoying, funny, or gross patient behavior is a frequent topic here. If you poke around in the search bar you will get literally thousands of results for things like "funny things patients say," or "least favorite things patients say," or, "what is your most gross, yucky, disgusting nursing horror story." Seriously thousands of them. And why not? We see the sort of stuff that most people can't even comprehend, let alone handle. Who else can we tell stories about pubic hair, or that time you helped a guy out of his car and his rotting feet stayed behind, or when you were helping a CNM do an exam and the patient coughed and her water broke in the CNM's face? You can't keep those stories to yourself, and sometimes you get good advice (don't clip pubic hair without asking) that you wouldn't have gotten if you hadn't asked.

  • May 29

    Quote from calivianya
    On the flip side, I had a patient have abdominal surgery and wake up with me in ICU. She was very startled that someone had shaved her pubes. She asked me why it was done and I told her that I honestly had no idea. Her surgical incision didn't go that low or anything, and ALL of the pubes were gone.

    The lost pubes bothered her more than the surgical pain - just the idea that someone would shave her pubes without asking her was intolerable, apparently. She said if she wanted her pubes shaved she would have shaved them herself. Something about the whole situation struck me as really hilarious.
    Former circulator here who did my share of abdominal prep, as well as vaginal prep prior to hysterectomies.

    Just regarding the abdominal surgery....oftentimes patients are shaved if there is *any chance* that the incision and surgical site will have to be extended emergently. There are specific AORN guidelines regarding how much skin must be prepped around the actual incision. Depending on what surgery and the surgical approach, even if at first glance it appears that the pubic hair is 6 inches out of the way, it still must be trimmed with electric clippers, the loose hair blotted up with an adhesive mit, and then prepped with surgical scrub or paint. Just for reference, an open heart skin prep is from neck to toes down both sides of the body due to high risk of infection. (We don't usually have to shave the entire body first, but it has happened.) Even for robotic or laparoscopic surgeries, our surgeons prefer to prep as if we would need to "go open".... And it pays to do so in terms of patient safety and post op infections.

    It is unfortunate that the patient in question didn't have this covered during education and consenting for the procedure. Shaving prior to skin prep in the OR is a major chore due to all the loose hair. In most cases it is not a task to be undertaken lightly, and skin irritation is a definite risk post op. Also, despite the fact that hair is natural and serves a purpose, it is still indeed considered dirty in the context of a surgical field. Not everyone needs to be shaved, but there are guidelines for that too.

    Just thought I would throw that out there.

  • May 29

    Quote from NotAllWhoWandeRN
    Sexual violence survivor here, so don't tell me I'm trivializing myself by advocating for someone else's right to not have their genitals handled and altered without consent. You cannot put sexual violations on a hierarchy of who's allowed to be hurt and how much.

    Whether it is sexual assault to handle someone's genitals and shave them, legally, depends on the motive of the person who did it. The motive in this case was clearly not to provide medical care, and the patient was unconscious and unable to consent/refuse, discuss, or even observe the procedure. If you have touched a patients genitals with no valid reason, it IS valid to ask what the motive actually was.

    Even if you don't view it as sexual assault, there is no reason to laugh at a patient who has had their intimate body parts handled and altered without consent. Even if you don't believe it's sexual, it's deeply personal. It should never have happened, and dismissing a patient who had that experience and was horrified by it is just plain wrong.

    Edited to add: I'd also like to note that to a survivor, having your bodily autonomy violated in nonsexual ways still evokes the fear and helplessness that "real" sexual assault created. Hearing other people tell you "It's not a big deal" is damaging. Hearing that healthcare professionals think it's funny turns my stomach.
    Well said. I hope this post makes people think and consider how it would feel to a person whose background you may not know. It may be no biggie to YOU but it may be a real big deal to him or her. Respect.

  • May 29

    Quote from Irish_Mist
    Sexual assault? Seriously?
    When your sexuality has been violated- acts such as this can be resurface a lot of things. Your genital areas are not some area that health care providers can just do as they like.

  • May 29

    Quote from Irish_Mist
    Does sexual fondling not mean grabbing, groping or touching genitalia for the purpose of sexual gratification? One does not have to "fondle" another to shave their public hair. I totally can understand why someone would be upset about their pubic hair being shaved without their permission. But calling it sexual assault is exaggeration. Arguing about the semantics of shaved pubic hair is ridiculous especially when there are multiple cases of rape, child molestation and trafficking happening EVERY DAY. Should her pubic hair been shaved without her consent? No. But it is not sexual assault. Calling it that is a mockery to real cases of sexual assault.
    Sexual violence survivor here, so don't tell me I'm trivializing myself by advocating for someone else's right to not have their genitals handled and altered without consent. You cannot put sexual violations on a hierarchy of who's allowed to be hurt and how much.

    Whether it is sexual assault to handle someone's genitals and shave them, legally, depends on the motive of the person who did it. The motive in this case was clearly not to provide medical care, and the patient was unconscious and unable to consent/refuse, discuss, or even observe the procedure. If you have touched a patients genitals with no valid reason, it IS valid to ask what the motive actually was.

    Even if you don't view it as sexual assault, there is no reason to laugh at a patient who has had their intimate body parts handled and altered without consent. Even if you don't believe it's sexual, it's deeply personal. It should never have happened, and dismissing a patient who had that experience and was horrified by it is just plain wrong.

    Edited to add: I'd also like to note that to a survivor, having your bodily autonomy violated in nonsexual ways still evokes the fear and helplessness that "real" sexual assault created. Hearing other people tell you "It's not a big deal" is damaging. Hearing that healthcare professionals think it's funny turns my stomach.

  • May 29

    Quote from Irish_Mist
    Straight from the Department of Justice: "Sexual assault is any type of sexual contact or behavior that occurs without the explicit consent of the recipient. Falling under the definition of sexual assault are sexual activities as forced sexual intercourse, forcible sodomy, child molestation, incest, fondling, and attempted rape."

    There is no mention of shaving pubic hair without consent. You could argue that it is battery since this was done without her consent but the sexual assault argument does not hold weight at all.
    "The term "sexual fondling" means the touching of the private body parts of another person (including the genitalia, anus, groin, breast, inner thigh, or buttocks) for the purpose of sexual gratification."

    Since when is it ok to handle patients' genitals when it is not required for medical care?

    If that were me, I would feel utterly violated. I would raise heck. If that were my patient, I would raise heck. I would document and file an incident report and report to however many managers I needed for an intervention to take place. How do you define what is uncceptable to do to an unconscious patient outside medical necessity, if you think touching and shaving a vulva is ok?

    On the note of hair in general, 99% of the time it is NOT a hygiene issue. If it wraps around a Foley (which was recently discussed), get permission to trim it. If it's literally caking with feces, maybe get permission to trim it. As someone pointed out, shaving is likely to compromise skin integrity in an area that - esp with bowel incontinence - is saturated with unfriendly bacteria. In four years, I have never once had a patient that needed their pubic hair removed for the sake of hygiene.


close
close