Content That Lev <3 Likes

Content That Lev <3 Likes

Lev <3, BSN, RN 37,924 Views

Joined Jun 3, '11 - from 'Another planet'. Lev <3 is a Registered Nurse. She has '3' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Emergency Department, MedSurg'. Posts: 2,336 (52% Liked) Likes: 4,321

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  • Apr 27

    QUOTE= Heathermaizey; What??? This makes no sense at all. HIPAA is pretty simple and clear cut. You can not talk about patients at all. There you go.


    If one could not talk about a "patient at all," then there would be NO medical books to learn from, NO case studies, No way to gather scientific-based evidence because discussing anything would be a HIPAA violation. It's about the identity of a person not a patients sickness. They just can not be tied together.

    Here is a example of how one can discuss a patient. No date and time, no names, don't identify the location. Don't talk as this was your patient. I've gone to many seminars. The opening sentence starts off by the Provider or Speaker stating: A patient presented, etc. and continues to expose every single detail without it being a HIPAA violation.

  • Apr 27

    Sometimes it's just about finding your niche in the nursing world. Floor nursing is not everyone's cup of tea. It wasn't mine, I knew that it wouldn't be from working as a CNA on a medsurg floor for three years before finishing nursing school. After two years at my first RN job I was pretty crispy around the edges for a variety of reasons, and changing from the ED to PACU made me love nursing again. One of the great things about nursing is that there are so many different areas you can work in and so many different things you can do with it that it's just a matter of finding the area you love.

  • Apr 27

    Why are you opening a whole new can of worms by contacting the BON. I have a psychiatrist history as well, but I certainly didn't want to involve the BON into my life until I needed to. Personally, the less contract with the BON I have, the better off I am. Just do your job and keep quiet about it. Trust me. Others will not give you sympathy or give you special treatment due to your "psychology history". Just about all the nurses I know have psychiatric issues. Very few don't. I wouldn't go around wearing it like a badge of courage. Not trying to be mean, I've been a nurse for 13 years.

  • Apr 27

    Zofran, dilaudid, dilaudid, dilaudid, turkey sandwich.

  • Apr 27

    Because I have been there , done that. And so has this thread.

  • Apr 26

    Quote from Ndy-RN
    LNo one will penalize you for taking Lorazepam!
    I assume you are not located in the United States due to the phraseology and syntax utilized in your post.

    Many entities here in the States would definitely penalize someone for using lorazepam if the person didn't possess a valid prescription. The black market for benzodiazepines is red hot in this neck of the woods, and many people purchase these pills illegally.

  • Apr 26

    This isn't the sort of thing you want to put out in public attached to a real picture of yourself. Forgive me if I'm wrong, but that doesn't look like a stock photo.

  • Apr 25

    10 months on and things are going well. I'm bracing myself for the trauma patients to start coming in, since the weather has warmed up. They're a different stripe than my elderly falls and general surgery types I get in the winter. I'm just about a year away from graduation from my ADN program.

  • Apr 25

    I don't know what the repercussions would be for you, but I'd be tempted to call out and tell them that you can't work because you were unable to get any rest and would be unsafe. I had to do that once when I worked night and go no sleep due to insomnia.

    I guess the moral of the story is that no good deed goes unpunished. You needed the time off and did your best to work with your employer, only to be jerked around. I don't know if you would have been better off not offering to come in at all or to turn off your phone (because you should have been sleeping!) but I'm sorry you're being treated so poorly.

  • Apr 24

    It's been a busy week for me, even though I feel like I've done very little actively. I've got a little extra bounce in my step (figuratively) since surgery and it has made me decide to get things done that I have been putting off for ages. Along the way, I've gathered some nursey lessons, some non, and I am still getting employer/employee lessons, but that was expected.

    This week, I have learned...

    (for my own health stuff, good to know for future patient care)

    I have gratitude for the donor I received a part from. The feeling is stronger than I expected. I wish I could say thank you to the family of the cadaver I received bone from.

    After a lumbar fusion, the anti-inflammatories they pry from your desperate hands (and refuse to give you anymore) will be the best possible reliever of post op pain. The second best will be muscle relaxers (skeletal muscle relaxants, not benzos).

    When spinal post op pain finally reduces, it does suddenly and dramatically. What a beautiful event that is!

    Due to my post op high fevers, it is really hard to shake the fear of infection. Last cefdinir was yesterday morning. Now I wait.

    I wanted to be able to say that nurses DON'T make the worst patients. But, apparently during my first set of vitals on the floor, I told the CNA she was doing it wrong. And then I took everything away from her and did it myself.

    It's become harder to remain appreciative and to continue to express appreciation to a person who is hyper and argumentative, and who has been home most of the days between March 6th and today. And who has a very different definition of helping. And who has no knowledge of ability beyond ABLE. Still, "appreciative" is appropriate because, overall, he's been amazing and he drops everything for me at the first hint I might ask for help. That said... I'm so glad he went in to work today! Now I'm on the lookout for "caretaker appreciation" gifts, or acts, that I am capable of right now. He's driving me nuts, but he does deserve actual gratitude.

    Counseling is the best thing I've done for myself in ages.

    (medical/nursing oriented directly)

    A cardiac nurse who just moved floors (probably this week) to post op spines will be so bothered by the amount of pain medication available to a patient that she'll blow the patient off (in the hopes of spreading out doses enough that SHE feels more comfortable giving them). And then the patient will spend hours trying to get it back under control again. In tears. Because pain. Horrible, horrible pain.

    Hemochromatosis is a malabsorption disorder in which iron levels become toxic (high, not low, in case that wasn't obvious), resulting in organs being overrun with iron. Other secondary diseases can result, which is how people usually are diagnosed. Hemochromatosis is usually not caught before damage is caused to organs (cirrhosis is typical), which will cause symptoms and lead to testing.

    (And now I'm geeking out on this - are there homeostatic processes that become permanently disrupted as a result of the high iron level? Or, if not permanently, for a prolonged period of time after iron level stabilization? Oxygen level, pH regulation, CO2, what drives breathing (O2? CO2?), etc.?)

    It sucks being the normal patient sandwiched between the escape artist who goes room to room insulting perfect strangers, and the lady with the curious family member who just stares in the neighboring rooms. Just keep this in mind if the normal patient prefers to keep the door closed.

    In the posterior open approach to lumbar interbody fusion, the surgeon really thinks on the fly through a lot of it. They obviously have the basic expectation and steps for the procedure as pretty standard for the technique they use. But some of the details and steps of it can't even be decided on until midway through.

    Related to that, I have half of an L5 vertebra. Also, the anticipated net balance of the loss of discs and bone, and the addition of hardware and cadaver bone, is + 3 mm.

    (lessons in employment)

    If I decide to not go back to my current/not current/current/maybe current/finally actually current job after everything I have gone through (believe me when I say it has been utter hell), *I* will be the one who looks like a jerk. I will never stop being appalled by this whole situation.

    Relating to that, there is a cardiothoracic scrub nurse needed locally (not my current employer) for 4-10s per week plus call (frequent) that pays $8-9 more per hour than my current job. Its making me wonder if I really do care how good of a recommendation I keep if I jump ship. Then I remember this is my first nursing job ever and the only person who screwed up in all of this is the manager. Absolutely everyone else has had my back and has treated me well. So, now, I email my friend, my person on the "inside" who got my foot in that door without me realizing it, and tell her gracefully that I can't burn this bridge. But, I think I might when the timing is better.

    (totally unrelated)

    There is a show called You Live In What, and it's so cool! I'm ready to comb through the countryside for historical landmarks and abandoned warehouses.

    My wallet has, in fact, been on vacation in Cape Canaveral, where they generously cut all my cards up including a $50 gas gift card I keep in there in case of emergency. It's home now. Yay. :\


    All this and I know I'm forgetting stuff still! Oh, well!

    What did you learn this week?

    A Tribe Called Quest - I Left My Wallet In El Segundo - YouTube

  • Apr 24

    Quote from amoLucia
    Hey! Like the other PPs, I suggest making a complimentary comment to that doctor next time you see him. I'm sure that would make his day. REALLY!

    And personally, I might even consider making him my own PMP! (Or was he the surgeon?)

    Any guesses as to what 'bad survey reports' will be forthcoming from that family?
    He was the surgeon (attending). I normally don't have much interaction with him because I work nights and normally deal with the on-call residents, but he happened to be on my unit around shift change.

    With him, this isn't out of character from what I understand. I'd heard good things about him before from other staff, and I can now say I certainly agree with them.

  • Apr 24

    Quote from Libby1987
    I don't honk if notify admin as that may not be perceived as favorable. I also wouldn't gift him for doing his job. But I would verbally and/or in writing tell him I appreciate his appropriate handling and for vouching for our nursing staff.
    I agree with this tactic! Walking up to someone and telling him how much you appreciate what he did goes a long long way. What that MD said was appropriate and needed. Anecdotally, my husband, who is a surgeon, had the nurses eating out of his hand and appreciated it when they called him with concerns...i.e. did their job. Ok, I did have to educate him over the years, but it has paid off for everyone, especially the patients. Why we don't stick up for each other is mind boggling to me. Commonsense, native shrewdness, team work, collaboration..but I digress....

    PS: I despise Press Ganey.

  • Apr 24

    Hey! Like the other PPs, I suggest making a complimentary comment to that doctor next time you see him. I'm sure that would make his day. REALLY!

    And personally, I might even consider making him my own PMP! (Or was he the surgeon?)

    Any guesses as to what 'bad survey reports' will be forthcoming from that family?

  • Apr 24

    Yes, I definitely would have gotten him a gift cert. to a nice restaurant or something like that. It's a shame that that kind of support is so uncommon.

  • Apr 24

    I would have bought that man lunch and flowers on the spot. And also written a note of praise to administration on his behalf, because you just know that patient is going to be complaining about him.


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