Latest Likes For Lev <3

Latest Likes For Lev <3

Lev <3, BSN, RN 38,473 Views

Joined Jun 3, '11 - from 'Another planet'. Lev <3 is a Registered Nurse. She has '3' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Emergency Department, MedSurg'. Posts: 2,403 (52% Liked) Likes: 4,402

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  • May 25

    I think the men in nursing is helping to shape our profession for the better. We welcome you.

    Why did you become a nurse? Rewarding, exciting, solid career, opportunities for growth, the diversity, great people...ahem women....any other reasons you can think of?

  • May 24

    I don't know, but if you took more than the recommended amount you should let your probation officer know and probably stop taking the norco. High dose ibuprofen tabs two weeks after a fall are probably just as effective if not more effective as norco and don't need to be cleared by your probation officer.

  • May 23

    And did they offer to let you transfer to a different department?

  • May 23

    Quote from sonotguilty
    it does, but I always lop all my hair off during the summertime, (just shaved on Thursday actually) but no, there is nothing in my system outside some old hydrocodone that I had an Rx for. And even that use was just 20mg on Thursday for tooth pain. So I'm covered. I didn't do any of this.
    Are you for real?? I mean who prescribed you 20mg of hydrocodone for tooth pain? Isn't that a little much? I smell a rat....

  • May 23

    And did they offer to let you transfer to a different department?

  • May 22

    I would not admit failure to my manager or to myself until I actually fail - meaning once you are told you have to leave. Until then, focus on improvement. You need to get an idea of specific areas that need improvement. You have a right to this information from your preceptor, manager, and educator. Please ask them for the top 5 areas that you need improvement in with specific example of what you are doing wrong and suggestions for doing them better.

    Please remember to always keep on your game face with management so you can ask for an internal transfer to med-surg or telemetry if you are asked to leave the ER.

  • May 20

    Your initial focus is the chief complaint. Once your assessment is complete then you will have a better idea of what the "real" problem is. The biggest problem becomes your priority.

    Ask every patient if they have had any "discomfort" in their chest or trouble breathing. I say "discomfort" because some people say "I've had a little tightness but no pain."

    When a patient comes back to the room attach the BP cuff and pulse ox and cycle your vitals.

    If they come in with any chest discomfort/reflux (especially if middle aged and above), abdominal pain (if middle aged and above), shortness of breath/trouble breathing, confusion, High/low BP, low SpO2, Low/high HR, palpitations, syncope, neuro complaints (seizure, stroke symptoms), lightheadedness, dizziness, drug overdose/withdrawal, etoh intoxication/withdrawal, or if they just don't look right they need an EKG and should be put on the monitor. This is a task that can be delegated. They will also need labs 98% of the time.


    Always eyeball your new patient even if you are not ready to go into the room.


    Also, try to fill your rooms as quickly as possible. Once you get your rooms filled you can catch up.


    Every patient who goes to the bathroom gets a urine cup.


    Every confused, elderly, demented, change in mental status, psych, drug overdose, etoh, and sick looking patient gets chux on their beds.

  • May 20

    I would start ASAP. The MBON is notoriously slow. I would make an in person visit ASAP to get started.

  • May 20

    I'm not a seasoned nurse, but I do work in Med-Surg and have fairly good time management/organizational skills IMHO. A very important part of organization is having a good brain-sheet. There are many of these available on AN. This is your go to place for important information about your patients. Another thing I am very strict about is to chart as I go, unless it is really impossible. If I empty a foley catheter, empty a drain, take a patient off a bedpan, or clear a pump, I document immediately after. Regarding wastes, it's good to do that right away, unless of course there is no one around. I have gone home with half full vials of dilaudid. If the patient is still there, I will waste with someone who worked the last shift with me. If not, I will toss it in the sharps container. It happens to all of us. As long as it doesn't happen to often, it will be ok. Regarding assessments, again, I document right after I do the assessment, unless I'm running out of time to give my meds. Then, I will stop documenting as I go, and focus on giving meds. I will still do the assessments (They take 2-5 minutes). Usually, I will open up the powerform and just document mental status or lung sounds or wound measurements or something off that I don't want to forget and save the rest of the documentation for later. If I have a patient going off the floor in the early morning, I will see them first and get all their documentation done. I save my heaviest patients for last, unless they are acutely declining. If I have a gtube or NG tube or anyone with crushed pills, I try to save for last. I prioritize who I give meds to first based on vital signs, blood sugar levels, and electrolyte levels, who is leaving the floor/going to surgery, and obviously by what time meds are due. Many of my patients are on q4 vitals, so I will follow the tech around and give antihypertensives after she finishes taking the patient's vital signs. Usually, by 11:30, I am finished all my morning documentation. If you would like to carry around small pieces of paper to jot down information, maybe purchase a small mini notebook so you won't lose important info. You can find these at dollar stores. I used them as a tech, but as a nurse, I just write on my report sheet. I use one report sheet for each patient.

  • May 18

    If something that can spoil or melt is left out enough for it to get room temperature or melt - milk, ice cream, fruit ice - into the garbage it goes.

    I also throw out half eaten jellos, apple sauce etc - if not eaten by the end of the shift - it gets thrown out.

    I try to organize the toiletries vs throw them out. However, nobody needs 3 emesis basins. The cleanest one stays, the others get chucked.

  • May 18

    Quote from Alchi94
    The staff was great on each unit, but I especially liked the larger group of younger staff on ICU balanced with more experienced RNs. I know if they have many new grads, that they must have a lot of experience precepting. I realize that sounds like I answered my own question about which unit to pick. If you are familiar with ICU, do you have any advice for or against/encouragement/tips?
    I know that it is probably easier to relate to younger staff but a lot of new grads on a unit is a red flag. The staff probably do have a lot of experience precepting, but they may be overburdened with precepting and just plain tired of precepting for months on end with no break.

    It sounds like your heart is with ICU, but if CCU has more experienced/seasoned staff than the ICU, I would choose CCU.

    What are the unit ratios?

    Does the CCU take only cardiac type patients? In some hospitals CCU is coronary care unit or cardiac care unit (AKA the cardiac ICU/CICU, and in others it stands for critical care unit.

  • May 18

    Why do you ask her if you think there is anything else that you need to know or review before going off orientation?

  • May 18

    You can contribute to the go fund me page. I think it would be therapeutic. Please talk this out.

  • May 18

    russianbear - How are you doing?

  • May 18

    Your initial focus is the chief complaint. Once your assessment is complete then you will have a better idea of what the "real" problem is. The biggest problem becomes your priority.

    Ask every patient if they have had any "discomfort" in their chest or trouble breathing. I say "discomfort" because some people say "I've had a little tightness but no pain."

    When a patient comes back to the room attach the BP cuff and pulse ox and cycle your vitals.

    If they come in with any chest discomfort/reflux (especially if middle aged and above), abdominal pain (if middle aged and above), shortness of breath/trouble breathing, confusion, High/low BP, low SpO2, Low/high HR, palpitations, syncope, neuro complaints (seizure, stroke symptoms), lightheadedness, dizziness, drug overdose/withdrawal, etoh intoxication/withdrawal, or if they just don't look right they need an EKG and should be put on the monitor. This is a task that can be delegated. They will also need labs 98% of the time.


    Always eyeball your new patient even if you are not ready to go into the room.


    Also, try to fill your rooms as quickly as possible. Once you get your rooms filled you can catch up.


    Every patient who goes to the bathroom gets a urine cup.


    Every confused, elderly, demented, change in mental status, psych, drug overdose, etoh, and sick looking patient gets chux on their beds.


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