Latest Comments by ixchel

ixchel, BSN, RN 43,785 Views

Joined Jun 3, '11. Posts: 5,158 (75% Liked) Likes: 19,720

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    Quote from Glycerine82
    "Real" Nurses come in all shapes, sizes and education levels.

    LTC nursing is no joke. It's exhausting and mind boggling at times.

    People who don't do patient care really shouldn't be making rules. A med pass at 1500, 1800 and 2000? Why?

    Not all CNAs are hard workers like I was. Some really have no business working with patients.
    I hate how crazy med admin times are! I have a sheet I use to organize my day, and the days when I look down and see things due literally every hour are just ridiculous. BUT! My favorite thing? When med admin times actually do coordinate properly, leaving you with 4 IV meds that take 30-60 min each all due at the same time, and it's on a patient with limb precautions and 18 blown veins.

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    Hi, all!

    This week, I have learned hoarding can be a blessing. (I promise that actually is nursing related. ) Always, ALWAYS retain documentation you receive from your employer.

    Recreating a timeline of events in writing to describe an emotional situation can bring those emotions to the surface again, fiercely, even if a decent amount of time has passed.

    I'm so thankful to have LadyFree take over while some things in my world are getting sorted out. Woman, YOU ROCK!

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    NotAllWhoWandeRN likes this.

    Hi, friends,

    Please forgive my absence. I've received a message from the lovely LadyFree, who I've happily handed the reins over to for a short while.

    Depending on how the next few weeks go, I may have a story to share that hopefully others can learn from. In the meantime....

    Love to all of you!

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    Two of my medical conditions (a neurological condition that is exasperated by sleeplessness, and now my spinal fusion) have been a bit of a nuisance and could be an issue in the future. Mostly it's the epilepsy that I'm concerned about. Twice EVER it has impaired me, changing my mental status.

    (before responses get icky - I've been tightly supervised and plans are in place to keep things safe and seizure free. It was a 2 week run of insomnia that caused the second episode. First episode was from a medication.)

    So, I have noticed the ones who recognize the atypical presentation of left temporal lobe epilepsy is those who work in the medical field. If I can't speak for myself, I need to communicate that it may be epilepsy causing the problem. Plus, it could be a good thing to mention the titanium.

    I'm thinking inner forearm. One saying "left temporal lobe epilepsy" and one saying "fusion L5/S1 spondylolisthesis". I could find some compression sleeves (or those adorable scrub sleeves) to ensure patients don't get weirded out by it. (Amazing how terrifying the work 'epilepsy' is to most people.)

    I want to prevent a disaster like something that happened months ago. I was in desperate need of a doctor but was sent home instead. No repeats of that, please!!! THIS is the situation I have not discussed here due to still pending litigation being possible.

    Anyway, you've heard my "pros" and we know the professional cons. My facility does require cover up. I think I'm allowed one inch visible.

    What are your thoughts? I need help deciding on this.

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    meanmaryjean likes this.

    Quote from Been there,done that
    Have you thought about hanging up this nursing thing.. and writing romance novels?
    Nahhhhh I'm just a jukebox hero with the eye stars and everything. Although.... I imagine Romance for Sundowners could be a most awesome genre.

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    Nurse Leigh likes this.

    Quote from AvaRose
    My only problem with this whole resume/cover letter thing is I have zero work experience that any HR or DON would care about when looking at me as a potential nurse. Working at Walmart and even being in the Navy with several large gaps in work history do NOTHING for me...which is probably why I have yet to get an interview. So now what? I can't just make stuff up to fill a resume and I don't have anything to say in a resume or cover letter without lying so none of the usual advice works...even career services at my school advised I fudge my information.
    You need to google nursing buzz words. Look them over. Think about ways you've done each and every one of those buzzwords in your prior jobs. Prior work experience absolutely is relevant. You just have to figure out how, and let them know.

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    Kitiger likes this.

    Glad you found it because when I searched for it again, it was not where I left it!

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    I am having the hardest time tapping "quote" and getting a response to post. This is really glitchy today.

    OP, I do not regret asking if you are a nurse. It is not childish, damaging, or whatever the other word is. Your OP and first comment read to me like an early-ish nursing student with enough med/surg experience/knowledge (or perhaps you are an inpatient CNA in school) to start gaining strong opinions on something you haven't put into practice.

    I stand by my question and every part of my comment.

    Katie, thank you for your comment on CI. The only CI coming to my brain was Clinical Instructor. Or Clinical Investigator.

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    Garden,RN likes this.

    Quote from moldyoldyrn
    One reason I quit ICU work and went to floor nursing with a passion is I got sick of watching machines. For me they seemed to interfere with my communication with the patient. That was MY own feeling. Of course then the floors got all the things that bing and bong and we wound up running after the alarms. You really get alarm fatigue quicker than you realize. I took care of full code vent patients on the floor, those who were medically stable enough to come out of the ICU. Take a vent, a few IV lines, etc and there you are right back taking care of alarms. The alarms are also distressing to the patients and families. May be there is a way to have the alarms go to a pager that the RN carries? I don't know the answer but I know what drove me crazy. Alarms on new machines that continued to beep regardless of what you did, so we went back to what we knew, manually timing drips until we could get a different machine. Sometimes we went through 3-4 machines until we got one that worked. They were so over used that pieces of them broke off after a few months. Who knows, maybe in a fit of pique some nurse tore the machine up so they would not have to listen to it. Fluid and electrolytes, drips, antibiotics, all need close monitoring but if you can't rely on the machine they give you then what do you do? I learned timing drug and drips by drops/min. I calculated the H---l out of those things and watched the patient like a hawk. Anyone remember the chambered IV lines used in pediatrics?

    You had a measuring chamber that you put fluid in, then added your meds and stood there and watched it while it dripped. Not a perfect system but so many times I hung out in the baby's room and played, changed, bathed while the meds went in so I knew the rate and was sure that they got the right dose at the right rate, over the right amount of time and made sure there was not infiltration. Seeing as how we gave stuff like micro doses of Gentamycin which is oto-toxic it was important. Plus we were giving minute doses of the stuff. I much preferred staying with the patient over answering a machine. Maybe I am too old and need to shut up. I don't know. I just know alarm fatigue is a real problem and it does not help patients. Their anxiety goes through the roof and then you have more problems to deal with.

    There is nothing so good as the "gut" feeling of an RN. Regardless of what a monitor says, trust your gut. If you know the patient then your gut tells you how to go. I know that many docs do not understand that "nurse gut " thing but some do and if you can back up that feeling with any clinical sign at all you can usually get an order for labs, x-rays or something to help diagnose. I have had many "gut" discussions with residents and after you are correct once and they don't see you as a threat(presentation is everything) well, BAM, you have a believer. I have had more than one resident thank me for the heads up. Let the resident know you are on their side and just advocating for your patient and I have found it usually wins them over. It has certainly improved my subsequent conversations with them. After all we are a team. OK now I shut up.
    I love this post.

    I had a Lung Ca admitted for pneumonia. Family stayed with him 24 hrs. They loved me because I listened. They felt blown off frequently, so we got along well. One night, he just wasn't right. No sure reason why. Hemodynamics were WNL, assessment WNL, lung sounds still dim, but improving. My gut said strongly - but there is SOMETHING.

    I grabbed the NOC MD, who said she could see a change in him as well. (She admitted him and he'd been A&O, speaking appropriately.) He was just OFF. You know what I mean. Grabbed ABGs and labs. On the ABGs, O2 resulted higher than I've ever seen. I'd never had a patient run O2 like that before, so it went against everything in me to let his sats drop. It just didn't feel right! We explained to the family what was going on so they wouldn't worry a lot. I made sure he was married to the unit tele screen so we could keep a close eye with the alarm in the room off.

    We got him better for a short while. The cancer did get him a short time later, though.

    That's one story of trusting my gut. I was born into the world of beeps, though, so they are intertwined a bit into my practice. It would be strange (at times, unnerving, probably) to go without them. I'd love to learn to get my assessment skills strong enough to feel 100% without them. I may believe STRONGLY in the "treat the patient, not the monitor" saying, but there are many shifts when I rely on those monitors to tell me when I need to check on something. (Even if it is boob sweat. )

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    Quote from Rose_Queen
    Or if you're on the mobile site, it's in the dark grey menu at the bottom of the page
    Bookmarks is an odd space. But I just now found how to go to my previous posts. That's a start.

    This week (8/13) is up!

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    I found this thread!!!! Omg I can't believe I just found it. It was on, like, page 4 of search results.

    Guys.... There is a new thread up now. I didn't expect to actually find this thread, so I didn't save the link. I'll try to come back with it. If you happen to be better at this and you don't see I've come back here yet, please post the link!

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    Farawyn, poppycat, xoemmylouox, and 4 others like this.

    Seriously. I'm just diving in right now.

    As an AN member...

    1. I absolutely, positively can NOT figure out a damn thing on desktop via mobile AN. Somebody, for the love of god, I've been finding my posts by clicking on notifications, going to likes, and following them to stuff I've bookmarked. I'm on safari on iphone. I found something that MIGHT be bookmarks, but crazy old threads are mixed with new ones. I am wondering how the heck I managed to stay active before the app. Maybe it was regular desktop pre-mobile desktop in those days. I can't remember, but I was never morefrustrated than I've been this week. Speaking of... Anyone able to link me to last week's thread? I hadn't posted in it before I lost app access. So now it's missing. Not really missing, just impatiently missing. YOU GUYS. I seriously can't get into this site anymore when it's this much more of a hassle.

    As a patient...
    2. Another hassle - STD's clinician feels that my claim is not extendable. Obviously my job as a bedside nurse is not relevant. Nothing was done on their end to review this until a few days before my claim ended. Two weeks now waiting on their decision and they're now requesting old records prior to my claim beginning. I'm pretty sure, if we keep this simple, if my surgeon feels my body is not capable of being at the bedside, and my hospital wont take me back as a result, then the insurance I have paid for without using for years now should continue my claim until I can fulfill the duties of my job.

    As a hospital employee:
    3. AND ANOTHER HASSLE! HR. I'm not going there. I just wont. It's been bad enough.

    As a patient's mom:
    4. Turns out my kid probably wasn't on abx long enough. Pretty sure Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever is back. No new ticks, no new exposures. I just think he wasn't treated long enough. New labs drawn. 21 days of doxy ordered. Waiting on lab results. So very thankful for the docs at my kids' pediatrics practice. I wish I could find adult doctors this wonderful.

    As a person who napped in an empty house today, after several days of feeling a sinus-y thing looming over me:
    5. My brain has managed to combine:
    (1)a David Bowie and a John Lennon (adult) kid documentary (pre-Bowie death, late 80s-ish) (spoiler: there was sex but after Lennon was gone)
    (2)filming a Lannister scene with the Lannister boys (the grown ones, not the kings) (spoiler: Brienne ends up with Tyrion. I did NOT see that coming.)
    (3)filming with a realistic Stark direwolf model trying to bite my leg off (I was actually afraid) (spoiler: it was Aryas)
    (4)and it was all with the dark undercurrent of TWD, where a shadowy Negan-esque character kills off a GOT character, but you wont know who until next season
    All of this in one dream. I skipped the part where a person I haven't seen in 18 years was there with his new husband. Flew in from Oregon. Or was it Washinton? I honestly cannot remember now. I'm still confused about the elbowy sex.

    I really don't actually have anything else to add. I didn't expect to be starting this this week. If there is another one out there done by the person I'd already talked to, I never heard back - I'm sorry! (Please see lesson number 1.)

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    Quote from Been there,done that
    I also got fired once after 2 weeks of orientation for "not smiling enough".
    In my head, after I read a story by you, I secretly end it with, "then I popped a cap in his ass," and imagine you standing in glorious rock star 80s poses with smoke/steam billowing behind you as car headlights beam through it toward you. Then in totally awesome slow-mo, you light a cigarette with one of those flip lighters. You drop the lighter with some badassery, and a trail of gasoline suddently ignites. You walk forward (as badasses do), staring into the distance. And as we see you in focus, walking toward the horizon, a random (but somehow important) building blows up behind the smoke of awesome.

    eta - OP, if you need to chart in quiet then chart in quiet. I know I prefer it. And some nights you really do need to sit near a patient's room. Maybe toward the end of a shift when you're caught up, you can go see what everyone is up to.

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    Nurse Leigh and caliotter3 like this.

    Quote from klone
    This bears repeating! YOU DID NOTHING WRONG, legally or ethically speaking. Your manager is spinning it so that you are the one at fault for all this. If pay was fair and equitable at your facility, this would be a non-issue. Now, they're exposed and are scrambling. Again, YOU DID NOTHING WRONG.

    Transparency is never a bad thing. But it should come from management/leadership!
    This, and OP is being "punished" by being put on night shift, rather than the rude gossipy nurses being dealt with or being "punished".

    Frankly, night shift is where all the fun nurses hide (including me ) so you'd totally have a blast on night shift. But I do NOT like how it was put out there as a punishment for you.

    The way I'd see it after seeing the manager be like that, is I'd sit back on the shift I was trained and hired on, and know that every nurse that leaves over the unfair wage gap is another open slot he'll have to fill at $37.50. He shouldn't coddle pettiness and he should pay his nurses better, apparently.