Content That ixchel Likes

ixchel, BSN, RN 53,101 Views

Joined Jun 3, '11. Posts: 5,163 (75% Liked) Likes: 19,912

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  • Sep 19

    It was unconscionable for her to take him of restraints without you present, aware and ready for plan B.

    But there are some more problems.

    Patients who need restraints for violence need 4 pt locked velcro restraints, not soft wrist restraints. Soft wrist is for pts who are confused and pulling on their tubing.

    If you can't do 4 pts locked Velcro like we do in psych, then soft wrist is not an alternative for a violent patient with the capability of kicking someone and folding his body in half like you describe. This kind of pt could get hurt or even die in soft wrist restraints.

    So you need another option if 4 pts are not available. Even if 4 pts are available, you need a new med order.

    If no meds are keeping him calm, you haven't found the right med yet.

    Haldol is a caution in the elderly and I'm guessing you've got a standing order for ativan, but have you tried thorazine, vistaril, benadryl or maybe even depakote?

    Call the doc and get this guy some new prns.

  • Sep 19

    Did you read the one about the Pa-arp?

  • Sep 19

    Awe, this thread is smashing! Its really making me laff.

  • Sep 19

    Quote from anon456
    I've always said it um-BIL-i-cus but a professor used to say um-bil-LI-cus and it irritated me.
    I once overheard an attending ask a student "so are an um-BIL-i-cus air um-bil-LI-cus kinda guy?" So apparently the latter is acceptable. For the record, I go with the former.

  • Sep 19

    Quote from psu_213
    What about the first 'c' in "arctic?"
    Are there people who do not? Who are these people?

  • Sep 19

    Anyone who makes an 'SH' out of an 'S'.......like shtrict instead of strict, or shtreet, instead of street. Drives. me. bonkers. What's worse is there is a radio DJ on the local station that talks like this with every 's' word. ugh. It's the little things that will get me in the end.

  • Sep 19

    Quote from enchantmentdis
    Sugar for diabetes----ugh, I hate that one.
    I've actually started calling it "sugar diabetes" when getting family history in my older black patients. They seem to understand better what I'm talking about.

  • Sep 19

    Sugar for diabetes----ugh, I hate that one.

  • Sep 19
  • Sep 19

    This is my new favorite thread I laughed a lot. My first degree is in English.

    I like "Dilaudin." As in "I'm allergic to everything except Dilaudin." Many variations.

  • Sep 19

    "How many diagnosises does that patient have?"

  • Sep 19

    We dual sign off all infusions at shift change. A couple nurses read drips as "migs per kig per hour" I don't know why it gets to me. Please, "milligrams per kilogram per hour"

  • Sep 19

    I heard slobbery glands instead of salivary glands. Considering the person was referring to a toddler it seemed appropriate.

  • Sep 19

    Quote from ICURN3020
    Another one...I was taught that "angina" is pronounced
    ann-gin-uh (similar sounding to Angela). Often hear it pronounced as ann-gi-nah (similar to vagina).
    ALL of our cardiologists pronounce it like vagina and it drives me crazy. I think either way is acceptable, I just personally think of vagina every single time and I can't take them seriously.

    I consistently get report from this one nurse and, without fail, says "alert and orient", instead of oriented. The abdomen is OBEAST and the lung sounds are DIMIMISHED. I used to get annoyed and want to correct her but now I just silently laugh in my head whenever I get report.

    Also, ALOT bugs me to no end. ALOT is NOT a word . End rant. LOL

  • Sep 19

    If we could do away with "sont-i-meter" I'd learn to live with everything else.

    Personally I'm pro-Oxford comma, although I don't necessarily disagree with Vampire Weekend's take on it.


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