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ixchel, BSN, RN 45,148 Views

Joined Jun 3, '11. Posts: 5,158 (75% Liked) Likes: 19,749

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  • Dec 8

    Well, I think there are a ton of confounding variables here. Awhile back, I did a poll asking how many nurses are married to law enforcement officers. Last time I saw it bumped, it was a large percentage. So, if law enforcement has a high divorce rate, is it the nurse or the LEO?

    High stress jobs which require hypervigilance will affect a person. So will seeing tragedy all the time. Are we talking inpatient? ED? Critical care? Peds? They each have different characteristics.

  • Dec 7

    The 160 hours are during pre-nursing years. The book learning takes place prior to senior year. Senior year is clinical. I absolutely love this! While, yes, nurses have to be able to focus on many things at once, I feel I would have gained sooooooo much more getting the book learning portion all at once over the first few years, and then the hands-on learning all at once at the end. You get the same amount of time and same level of instruction. It's just organized differently. I would have preferred it that way, definitely!

  • Dec 5

    Monitor tech calls me while I'm in a patient room (not room 9).

    Tech: your patient in room 9 needs batteries changed. She's down to red now.

    Me: it's okay if she dies. She's discharged anyway.

    I hang up. Then I look up to horrified expressions on the faces of the patient and spouse in front of me.

    I immediately pull my foot out of my mouth to clarify, "her batteries!!! It's okay if her batteries die! Not the patient!"

    I then go into patient education regarding the function of telemetry and our monitor tech.

  • Dec 5

    Doctor: this is Dr. Nephrology. Did you page me?

    Me (after thinking for a good, long second): No, I did not. Do you know which extension you need?

    Doctor: No.

    Me, asking the few nurses in the nearby vicinity: Did you page Dr. Nephrology?

    All of the nurses nearby: No

    Doctor: Okay, I'll go back to the operator then

    (Less than a minute later)

    Operator: Hello, this is the operator. I have Dr. Nephrology on the line for you.

    Me: I didn't page Dr. Nephrology.

    Operator (full of attitude): Well, SOMEONE did.

    (Probably about 90 seconds of dead silence. I was waiting for her to say something else, considering it would be a tiny bit crazy for her to think I would know whether any nurse on my floor, let alone the whole building, actually paged him.)

    Me: I really didn't page him. I'm sorry.



    Apparently I was supposed to be psychic. I did grab the one nurse who wasn't present the first time I asked around. Her extension was different than mine by only one number. Where mine had a 6, hers had a 7. That nurse did page the Doctor. 😲

  • Dec 5

    Monitor tech calls me while I'm in a patient room (not room 9).

    Tech: your patient in room 9 needs batteries changed. She's down to red now.

    Me: it's okay if she dies. She's discharged anyway.

    I hang up. Then I look up to horrified expressions on the faces of the patient and spouse in front of me.

    I immediately pull my foot out of my mouth to clarify, "her batteries!!! It's okay if her batteries die! Not the patient!"

    I then go into patient education regarding the function of telemetry and our monitor tech.

  • Dec 5

    Monitor tech calls me while I'm in a patient room (not room 9).

    Tech: your patient in room 9 needs batteries changed. She's down to red now.

    Me: it's okay if she dies. She's discharged anyway.

    I hang up. Then I look up to horrified expressions on the faces of the patient and spouse in front of me.

    I immediately pull my foot out of my mouth to clarify, "her batteries!!! It's okay if her batteries die! Not the patient!"

    I then go into patient education regarding the function of telemetry and our monitor tech.

  • Dec 4

    My little minty delight, allow me to provide some feedback. I'm able to figure out your Xs, *s, and #s, so I assure you, I am understanding properly as I type this.

    My belief here is that you are positing your success with your job hunt has a lot to do with securing the interview with your resume. I'm inclined to agree, however, now that I am seeing it, I'm seeing good things and bad things. Allow me to share my thoughts as advice for future searches, not as criticism (I assure you, this is not criticism).

    First, some background on me - I'm a 30-something who came to nursing after trying other areas first. Like many people, my younger days were bartending and retail, but then I moved on to some unusual/unique roles, and more professional roles. I won't be more specific than that because the combination of unique and professional roles will quickly identify who I am to those who know me.

    For my track record on resume and cover letter writing, I have literally NEVER been passed over for an interview. Every single time I have submitted my own letter and resume, I have sat for an interview.

    Out of every interview I have sat for, I have been offered a job every time except twice.

    The first time, I was a tiny 19 year old hot chick who looked 15 applying for a job as a corrections officer. It was the right decision.

    The second time, I applied for a nursing scholarship/residency program at a tiny hospital that doesn't have women's health or pediatrics. The interviewers sized me up and thought I wouldn't stay there after my contractual obligation because these populations weren't served there. I was actually pretty angry over this as by this time, I'd decided against both specialties. But, their HR/recruiter called AND emailed stating that you normally get a Dear John letter, but they were so impressed by me and my resume that they really struggled to make the decision to not hire me. Ironically, I've been on an adult critical care unit very happily.

    My current job, first one in healthcare, I competed against 250 applicants for four slots. Some of those applicants already worked there. Since ICU wasn't taking on a resident nurse that year, my unit was the one to get. My resume got me in the door with 24 other applicants, my interview sealed the deal.

    My point here is that I am my only resource in the format and feedback I am about to share. I hope I am legitimized by my track record.

    Now, regarding your letter. You took the time to look up the organization. You stated an example of how you embody their vision/mission. That is a wonderful way to connect yourself with the organization showing how you are already part of their team. I find it may also help to look up something they're working on, or something that has been in the news. Show some enthusiasm regarding that goal or accomplishment.

    For the letter itself, it absolutely has to be one page. It needs to be strongly worded regarding how awesome you are, but how humbled you are to receive this opportunity. NO ONE will brag about you, so you should. Not in an annoying way, of course. But don't hold back. If you've achieved something, mention it. Don't be "that guy" though. If you ONLY brag, you're going to be that guy who is unwilling to learn, adjust to change, show humility, show vulnerability, make mistakes with some grace and transparency.

    You need to close this letter as though you've already got the job, and all the interview is is an opportunity to talk about it. I think it's very strong to end with, "I look forward to meeting with you soon and discussing our future together!" It tells the reader you already see yourself as part of the organization. It says you're committed to this opportunity.

    Now, for the resume. Again, concise is good. If you need two pages, make the second page education and awards. The fact that you have a degree in nursing is obvious if you're applying for a nursing job. And, we nurses tend to be overachievers, so awards are nice to add, but not as important as the professional experiences you've had and your personal statement.

    On the work experience, list your relevant job experience. No one wants to read through the 19 restaurants you blew through in your teens and early 20s. Relevant jobs should leave little to no gaps in employment years, go back a minimum of ten years, if applicable, and every job experience should be able to be described with strong nursing buzz words. Time management, leader, delegation, organization, responsibility, prioritization, customer service, multi-tasking, high-speed environment, management, management of employees, engaging, development of interpersonal relationships, budgeting, etc. Many jobs can include these buzz words. Heck, one of my unique jobs, you'd NEVER imagine I could relate that to nursing buzz words, but I did. Gotta think outside the box. You can't by obvious about it, of course. You just need to fit some of those words in and trust me, they'll be noticed.

    So for jobs, you briefly describe your duties, and then you briefly describe the skills you gained. After all, we are all evolving as we start every new adventure.

    Now, this individual post is enormous already, so I'm going to put the end result of all of this rambling in my next comment.

  • Dec 1

    Quote from BrandonLPN
    But, in this specific scenario, it really wasn't feasible to obtain an order for PICC draws right at that moment, in time for that blood draw that needed to be drawn at that time.

    I think adressing it in the morning, to be taken care of that day, is fine and being an advocate and a prudent nurse and all that.

    If this had been passed on from shift to shift with no one owning it, and the patient getting poked over and over, that'd be another story.
    Thank you, Brandon. And yes, that's what I'm saying. This patient facility hops and has a ton going on with her. The PICC was placed a hospital 30 miles south of where I work before she was discharged to a short term place. When she was admitted to my hospital, my understanding is the admitting hospitalist received from the MD who placed and is managing the PICC that we are allowed to run meds through it ONLY. I don't know why, nor was I given the opportunity to ask. Based on the way that shift went, the thought didn't even cross my mind until lab was there, telling me I needed to draw the labs. The order and note specifically said the PICC was for meds only. At 4:30 in the morning, no, I was not going to contact the hospital's ONE night time hospitalist (who specifically is only there for symptom management, not plan of care issues, unless the patient is unstable or newly admitted - neither applied to her) to tell him he needed to call a doctor who consults for a neighboring hospital to change the order.

    Yes, I understand advocating for patients. A million and one percent, I understand advocating for patients. I also have a realistic understanding of what is possible. We are not a large hospital with residents in abundance. I work for a small rural community hospital without access to everything we might want right then and there. It's a skeleton crew on night shift. Unfortunately it does mean that there will be times when we have to give things to day shift. I didn't get her back, so I don't know if the order changed. Genuinely, I do hope it did.

  • Dec 1

    Does this happen at your hospital?

    Recent examples:

    #1:
    Radiology tech: "this patient has q0600 portable chest X-rays part of his old ICU order set. They normally DC these but they didn't DC his. Do I really need to do this?"

    #2:
    Me, to a different radiology tech: "we just discovered he might have foot fractures and I'm putting in orders right this exact second. Do you mind grabbing images of his feet while you're here?"
    Rad tech: "the order wasn't already in so your, have to get that later."
    Me: "the order is in right now."
    Rad tech: "no."
    Two seconds later, does the images anyway, because she realized it meant she'd have to come all the way upstairs again.

    #3:
    Respiratory: "Earlier MD asked for a different patient to have ABGs done at 0800" (after RT's shift would be over) "so we can just do this patient's in a few hours, too, right?"

    #4:
    Lab, after walking the whole unit to find me: "that patient has a PICC, why can't you draw her?"
    Me: "I don't have orders saying I can."
    Lab: "I saw her get drawn off that line last week, you need to draw her."
    Me: "her line isn't being used for labs. I don't have an order saying it can be. I CAN'T use it. You need to draw her."

    If it weren't the same people trying to get out of their orders every time, I'd figure they were just confirming things, but I am absolutely convinced they're trying to get out of doing their job, and they're trying to get the RN's "okay" so they can pass the buck to us, I am so done with this! If they want to questions orders, they should call the people writing them. :\

  • Nov 29

    Quote from hollyspiller0253
    I am a full time nurse 3p-11p. Our 11-7 nurse is out on DBL. The charge nurse told me she will file Abandonment charges against my license If I don't pick up some of those extra shifts.

    Here is the thing...it isn't Abandonment because they knew of those absences in a reasonable time frame to find appropriate coverage. We even have contract nurses available.

    What can I do about all of this?

    And she didn't even ask me to pick up the shift. She threatened me with mandation, and when I informed her she could not legally mandate me she immediately told me she would file abandonment charges against my licence.

    I'm in NY.

    HELP
    Ask her what kind of charges she'll try for if you put in your two weeks' notice.

    Your charge nurse deserves some well-chosen cuss words describing her intelligence. You are not required to do overtime. I imagine federal labor laws trump your BON, not that they would even begin to view this as abandonment.

  • Nov 25

    Quote from RestlessHeart
    This thread is probably ancient but WTH. I quoted this post to say that I have actually had MY doctor give me an IM injection for pain as well as putting an IV in. trust me in this one instance..He did way better, quicker and less painless than any of his nurses (NO offense to ANY nurse here)
    We had a patient ask for a doctor to put an IV in recently. So he walks into the room, "do you really want the person who hasn't don't this since residency? Or would you rather it be the one who does this every day?" They chose the nurse.

    P.S. I think this is one of those ancient threads that get a free pass on bumping if it stays on topic. It's a good one!

  • Nov 25

    Quote from nrcnurse
    Aren't all nurses Jedi???
    Man, I wish.

    One I could have used this week:

    "You will keep the bipap on your face."

  • Nov 25

    On House, Cameron pronounces ascites "ASS-sites". Gonna have to work that one into the vocabulary.

  • Nov 25

    Quote from Jensmom7
    Which is why Hospice families are always horrified when you're doing post mortem care and their eyes won't stay closed all the way. *sigh*
    Maybe if nurses were Jedi?

    "Your eyes will close now."

  • Nov 25

    When people pass their flattened hands down a face and the eyes of the deceased magically close.


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