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ixchel, BSN, RN 55,675 Views

Joined: Jun 3, '11; Posts: 5,173 (75% Liked) ; Likes: 19,988

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  • May 26

    "There is a cat over there and it won't stop staring at me."

  • May 5

    Quote from Nolander
    I'm entering my 4th semester in my program with 9 people. We started with 25. My school has the highest NCLEX pass rates in the surrounding area. Nobody at all in my program has managed to make an A in any of our classes so far and only a select few (1-3 people) have managed to make low B's in a couple of our classes we've taken thus far.

    We are required to have a 78% as our final grade to pass. We've had people fail out of an entire class by .02% (no rounding up). Our check-offs for our lab skills (med admin, foley, etc.) must be performed perfectly in front of an instructor. If you miss a critical step you are allowed to repeat the skill one more time, should you fail again you are forced to withdraw from the class. You can reapply to the program but, obviously, many people fail out and it is very difficult to get re-admitted.
    This is insane. How does this kind of brutality in a program actually support worthy people in becoming confident, well-rounded nurses?

  • Apr 28

    I just looked at a typical billing rate for TMS and I am absolutely appalled that with your prediction of 45 treatments per week leaves you with a pay expectation of $20/hour. Stop telling us what your overhead is. Stop trying to compare your anticipated income to what psychiatrists typically make. Either pay a nurse the hourly wages that a nurse should make, offer benefits, and give a competitive vacation package. Would you ever go into practice with a physician and offer them half what they should make? If you WANT a nurse, PAY for a nurse. You CAN afford it.

    (I mean, seriously, the last commenter here is running a TMS program. In my observation, programs offering only one type of treatment (and hiring "coordinators", no less) exist because they're profitable.)

    Also, for the love of god, don't hire a new grad nurse. This would be career suicide for a desperate new grad who would accept any offer thrown at them just to start working, especially if they continue to work for you for a long time.

    God, I'm going to have this thread rattling in my brain for awhile now. Just when we've been working so hard toward better respect between different types of healthcare licenses, stuff like this still happens.

  • Apr 28

    I just looked at a typical billing rate for TMS and I am absolutely appalled that with your prediction of 45 treatments per week leaves you with a pay expectation of $20/hour. Stop telling us what your overhead is. Stop trying to compare your anticipated income to what psychiatrists typically make. Either pay a nurse the hourly wages that a nurse should make, offer benefits, and give a competitive vacation package. Would you ever go into practice with a physician and offer them half what they should make? If you WANT a nurse, PAY for a nurse. You CAN afford it.

    (I mean, seriously, the last commenter here is running a TMS program. In my observation, programs offering only one type of treatment (and hiring "coordinators", no less) exist because they're profitable.)

    Also, for the love of god, don't hire a new grad nurse. This would be career suicide for a desperate new grad who would accept any offer thrown at them just to start working, especially if they continue to work for you for a long time.

    God, I'm going to have this thread rattling in my brain for awhile now. Just when we've been working so hard toward better respect between different types of healthcare licenses, stuff like this still happens.

  • Apr 20

    Quote from brillohead
    I can neither confirm nor deny that my charting recently said, "Attending informed of sepsis criteria; stated not concerned because patient not hypoxic".

    Fever of 103 untouched by regular doses of Tylenol, chills, sweats, aches, shallow/rapid breathing, significant drop in BP (I wanna say it was around 105/50), O2 sat = 90%...

    I can also neither confirm nor deny that within five minutes of my charting about his lack of interest, the attending came and personally checked on the patient.

    That would get a big ol' NO ORDERS RECEIVED from me!

  • Apr 20

    This reminds me of a conversation I had with a surgeon when I asked for parameters that might warrant calling him over night. He said, "don't contact me. Contact Doctor Aware."

    Anytime you EVER see the words "no new orders received" in my charting, it means one of two things:

    1. The patient is being unbelievably impossible regarding something either dangerous or not at all medically indicated, and thankfully the MD agrees

    2. The hospitalist is being an asshat

    "No orders received" is my polite way of saying, "are you effing kidding me," and other variations of, "what the eff, man."

    As for the rest of my list, AN will asterisk out enough words that it would make no sense.

  • Apr 18

    I learned very, very quickly that you can't save patients from themselves. That, to me, was no big deal. The hardest thing? When the patient DOES want to save themselves, but there are literally no resources available to make them successful at it.

  • Apr 16

    Quote from avengingspirit1
    But the topics of staffing levels and nurse education and their effect on mortality rates are mutually exclusive and should have been examined in that way if the authors really wanted to imply that RN education levels affected patient outcomes.
    You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

  • Apr 16

    Maybe if you take sociology of nursing or theoretical foundations of nursing, you'd actually have half a clue what you're talking about. I further add that maybe a course in research would be helpful as well.

    I'm working with BS students now. You know what they're learning? "early signs of sepsis, diabetes complications or new wound healing methods or new methods to accelerate healing and speed recovery"

    Literally. Our juniors are learning this during this semester.


    Speaking of people crawling out of their cubby-holes, hi, everyone. Nice to pop in again.

    AS1, always nice to be dragged back yet again by you. Thanks for the email notification on a 4 year old thread.

  • Apr 4

    Quote from avengingspirit1
    But the topics of staffing levels and nurse education and their effect on mortality rates are mutually exclusive and should have been examined in that way if the authors really wanted to imply that RN education levels affected patient outcomes.
    You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

  • Apr 4

    Quote from avengingspirit1
    But the topics of staffing levels and nurse education and their effect on mortality rates are mutually exclusive and should have been examined in that way if the authors really wanted to imply that RN education levels affected patient outcomes.
    You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

  • Apr 4

    Maybe if you take sociology of nursing or theoretical foundations of nursing, you'd actually have half a clue what you're talking about. I further add that maybe a course in research would be helpful as well.

    I'm working with BS students now. You know what they're learning? "early signs of sepsis, diabetes complications or new wound healing methods or new methods to accelerate healing and speed recovery"

    Literally. Our juniors are learning this during this semester.


    Speaking of people crawling out of their cubby-holes, hi, everyone. Nice to pop in again.

    AS1, always nice to be dragged back yet again by you. Thanks for the email notification on a 4 year old thread.

  • Apr 4

    Quote from avengingspirit1
    But the topics of staffing levels and nurse education and their effect on mortality rates are mutually exclusive and should have been examined in that way if the authors really wanted to imply that RN education levels affected patient outcomes.
    You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

  • Apr 4

    Maybe if you take sociology of nursing or theoretical foundations of nursing, you'd actually have half a clue what you're talking about. I further add that maybe a course in research would be helpful as well.

    I'm working with BS students now. You know what they're learning? "early signs of sepsis, diabetes complications or new wound healing methods or new methods to accelerate healing and speed recovery"

    Literally. Our juniors are learning this during this semester.


    Speaking of people crawling out of their cubby-holes, hi, everyone. Nice to pop in again.

    AS1, always nice to be dragged back yet again by you. Thanks for the email notification on a 4 year old thread.

  • Apr 4

    Maybe if you take sociology of nursing or theoretical foundations of nursing, you'd actually have half a clue what you're talking about. I further add that maybe a course in research would be helpful as well.

    I'm working with BS students now. You know what they're learning? "early signs of sepsis, diabetes complications or new wound healing methods or new methods to accelerate healing and speed recovery"

    Literally. Our juniors are learning this during this semester.


    Speaking of people crawling out of their cubby-holes, hi, everyone. Nice to pop in again.

    AS1, always nice to be dragged back yet again by you. Thanks for the email notification on a 4 year old thread.


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