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ixchel, BSN, RN 54,173 Views

Joined Jun 3, '11. Posts: 5,169 (75% Liked) Likes: 19,959

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  • Jan 12

    Quote from FullGlass
    I see posts on this forum from many students, RNs, and NPs who agonize over what other people think, even making career choices based on what their peers say, as opposed to going with their heart, only to end up regretting their choice.
    You'll find a lot of those "go with your heart" and never follow advice or feedback folks over in the student and first year after licensing forums. Spoiler: it's not pretty.

  • Jan 11

    Quote from FullGlass
    You know, you all remind me of high school. No, not even that. It's more like middle school. Guess what? I do not live my life based on what other people think of me or what they think I should do. Never have, never will. It's incredibly liberating - you all should try it sometime. Especially since I see posts on this forum from many students, RNs, and NPs who agonize over what other people think, even making career choices based on what their peers say, as opposed to going with their heart, only to end up regretting their choice.

    Now, since I have a lot of prior career success, let me share something with you. Women (and most of you are women) really handicap themselves by trying to be "good girls," "nice," "modest," and "get along with everyone." That attitude is why women often do not get paid equally to men or get promoted as quickly as men. At work, men do not try to be humble or obsess over what their peers think. They think not if they CAN do the job, but if they COULD do the job. Once I adopted that mindset I started getting paid as much or more than my male counterparts and my career path started on a steep upwards trajectory.

    My original post started very clearly that I am nothing special. Go and reread it. As people began criticizing me, I defended myself. Somehow, that just made some of you even more upset. Why? Because I did not kowtow to you?

    I AM a very accomplished person. In order to get a job, one must interview well and sell oneself and one's accomplishments. I don't go into an interview trying to downplay myself. If I did, I would not have received any job offers.

    What seems to bother you all is that I am self-aware. I know my strengths and also know my weaknesses. I am comfortable with who I am and proud of my achievements. I am not going to downplay that in order to make members of the collective hive mind here feel better about themselves.

    Now, I am going to get another cup of coffee and go work on my deck overlooking the beautiful Pacific Ocean in Southern California.
    Also, if you genuinely don't care what people think, why do you keep responding?

  • Jan 11

    Quote from FullGlass
    You know, you all remind me of high school. No, not even that. It's more like middle school. Guess what? I do not live my life based on what other people think of me or what they think I should do. Never have, never will. It's incredibly liberating - you all should try it sometime. Especially since I see posts on this forum from many students, RNs, and NPs who agonize over what other people think, even making career choices based on what their peers say, as opposed to going with their heart, only to end up regretting their choice.

    Now, since I have a lot of prior career success, let me share something with you. Women (and most of you are women) really handicap themselves by trying to be "good girls," "nice," "modest," and "get along with everyone." That attitude is why women often do not get paid equally to men or get promoted as quickly as men. At work, men do not try to be humble or obsess over what their peers think. They think not if they CAN do the job, but if they COULD do the job. Once I adopted that mindset I started getting paid as much or more than my male counterparts and my career path started on a steep upwards trajectory.

    My original post started very clearly that I am nothing special. Go and reread it. As people began criticizing me, I defended myself. Somehow, that just made some of you even more upset. Why? Because I did not kowtow to you?

    I AM a very accomplished person. In order to get a job, one must interview well and sell oneself and one's accomplishments. I don't go into an interview trying to downplay myself. If I did, I would not have received any job offers.

    What seems to bother you all is that I am self-aware. I know my strengths and also know my weaknesses. I am comfortable with who I am and proud of my achievements. I am not going to downplay that in order to make members of the collective hive mind here feel better about themselves.

    Now, I am going to get another cup of coffee and go work on my deck overlooking the beautiful Pacific Ocean in Southern California.
    Also, if you genuinely don't care what people think, why do you keep responding?

  • Jan 10

    Quote from FullGlass
    I see posts on this forum from many students, RNs, and NPs who agonize over what other people think, even making career choices based on what their peers say, as opposed to going with their heart, only to end up regretting their choice.
    You'll find a lot of those "go with your heart" and never follow advice or feedback folks over in the student and first year after licensing forums. Spoiler: it's not pretty.

  • Jan 10

    Quote from FullGlass
    You know, you all remind me of high school. No, not even that. It's more like middle school. Guess what? I do not live my life based on what other people think of me or what they think I should do. Never have, never will. It's incredibly liberating - you all should try it sometime. Especially since I see posts on this forum from many students, RNs, and NPs who agonize over what other people think, even making career choices based on what their peers say, as opposed to going with their heart, only to end up regretting their choice.

    Now, since I have a lot of prior career success, let me share something with you. Women (and most of you are women) really handicap themselves by trying to be "good girls," "nice," "modest," and "get along with everyone." That attitude is why women often do not get paid equally to men or get promoted as quickly as men. At work, men do not try to be humble or obsess over what their peers think. They think not if they CAN do the job, but if they COULD do the job. Once I adopted that mindset I started getting paid as much or more than my male counterparts and my career path started on a steep upwards trajectory.

    My original post started very clearly that I am nothing special. Go and reread it. As people began criticizing me, I defended myself. Somehow, that just made some of you even more upset. Why? Because I did not kowtow to you?

    I AM a very accomplished person. In order to get a job, one must interview well and sell oneself and one's accomplishments. I don't go into an interview trying to downplay myself. If I did, I would not have received any job offers.

    What seems to bother you all is that I am self-aware. I know my strengths and also know my weaknesses. I am comfortable with who I am and proud of my achievements. I am not going to downplay that in order to make members of the collective hive mind here feel better about themselves.

    Now, I am going to get another cup of coffee and go work on my deck overlooking the beautiful Pacific Ocean in Southern California.
    Also, if you genuinely don't care what people think, why do you keep responding?

  • Jan 10

    Quote from FullGlass
    I see posts on this forum from many students, RNs, and NPs who agonize over what other people think, even making career choices based on what their peers say, as opposed to going with their heart, only to end up regretting their choice.
    You'll find a lot of those "go with your heart" and never follow advice or feedback folks over in the student and first year after licensing forums. Spoiler: it's not pretty.

  • Jan 9

    Quote from FullGlass
    I see posts on this forum from many students, RNs, and NPs who agonize over what other people think, even making career choices based on what their peers say, as opposed to going with their heart, only to end up regretting their choice.
    You'll find a lot of those "go with your heart" and never follow advice or feedback folks over in the student and first year after licensing forums. Spoiler: it's not pretty.

  • Jan 8

    Quote from FullGlass
    You know, you all remind me of high school. No, not even that. It's more like middle school. Guess what? I do not live my life based on what other people think of me or what they think I should do. Never have, never will. It's incredibly liberating - you all should try it sometime. Especially since I see posts on this forum from many students, RNs, and NPs who agonize over what other people think, even making career choices based on what their peers say, as opposed to going with their heart, only to end up regretting their choice.

    Now, since I have a lot of prior career success, let me share something with you. Women (and most of you are women) really handicap themselves by trying to be "good girls," "nice," "modest," and "get along with everyone." That attitude is why women often do not get paid equally to men or get promoted as quickly as men. At work, men do not try to be humble or obsess over what their peers think. They think not if they CAN do the job, but if they COULD do the job. Once I adopted that mindset I started getting paid as much or more than my male counterparts and my career path started on a steep upwards trajectory.

    My original post started very clearly that I am nothing special. Go and reread it. As people began criticizing me, I defended myself. Somehow, that just made some of you even more upset. Why? Because I did not kowtow to you?

    I AM a very accomplished person. In order to get a job, one must interview well and sell oneself and one's accomplishments. I don't go into an interview trying to downplay myself. If I did, I would not have received any job offers.

    What seems to bother you all is that I am self-aware. I know my strengths and also know my weaknesses. I am comfortable with who I am and proud of my achievements. I am not going to downplay that in order to make members of the collective hive mind here feel better about themselves.

    Now, I am going to get another cup of coffee and go work on my deck overlooking the beautiful Pacific Ocean in Southern California.
    Also, if you genuinely don't care what people think, why do you keep responding?

  • Jan 8

    Quote from FullGlass
    You know, you all remind me of high school. No, not even that. It's more like middle school. Guess what? I do not live my life based on what other people think of me or what they think I should do. Never have, never will. It's incredibly liberating - you all should try it sometime. Especially since I see posts on this forum from many students, RNs, and NPs who agonize over what other people think, even making career choices based on what their peers say, as opposed to going with their heart, only to end up regretting their choice.

    Now, since I have a lot of prior career success, let me share something with you. Women (and most of you are women) really handicap themselves by trying to be "good girls," "nice," "modest," and "get along with everyone." That attitude is why women often do not get paid equally to men or get promoted as quickly as men. At work, men do not try to be humble or obsess over what their peers think. They think not if they CAN do the job, but if they COULD do the job. Once I adopted that mindset I started getting paid as much or more than my male counterparts and my career path started on a steep upwards trajectory.

    My original post started very clearly that I am nothing special. Go and reread it. As people began criticizing me, I defended myself. Somehow, that just made some of you even more upset. Why? Because I did not kowtow to you?

    I AM a very accomplished person. In order to get a job, one must interview well and sell oneself and one's accomplishments. I don't go into an interview trying to downplay myself. If I did, I would not have received any job offers.

    What seems to bother you all is that I am self-aware. I know my strengths and also know my weaknesses. I am comfortable with who I am and proud of my achievements. I am not going to downplay that in order to make members of the collective hive mind here feel better about themselves.

    Now, I am going to get another cup of coffee and go work on my deck overlooking the beautiful Pacific Ocean in Southern California.
    Also, if you genuinely don't care what people think, why do you keep responding?

  • Jan 8

    Quote from FullGlass
    You know, you all remind me of high school. No, not even that. It's more like middle school. Guess what? I do not live my life based on what other people think of me or what they think I should do. Never have, never will. It's incredibly liberating - you all should try it sometime. Especially since I see posts on this forum from many students, RNs, and NPs who agonize over what other people think, even making career choices based on what their peers say, as opposed to going with their heart, only to end up regretting their choice.

    Now, since I have a lot of prior career success, let me share something with you. Women (and most of you are women) really handicap themselves by trying to be "good girls," "nice," "modest," and "get along with everyone." That attitude is why women often do not get paid equally to men or get promoted as quickly as men. At work, men do not try to be humble or obsess over what their peers think. They think not if they CAN do the job, but if they COULD do the job. Once I adopted that mindset I started getting paid as much or more than my male counterparts and my career path started on a steep upwards trajectory.

    My original post started very clearly that I am nothing special. Go and reread it. As people began criticizing me, I defended myself. Somehow, that just made some of you even more upset. Why? Because I did not kowtow to you?

    I AM a very accomplished person. In order to get a job, one must interview well and sell oneself and one's accomplishments. I don't go into an interview trying to downplay myself. If I did, I would not have received any job offers.

    What seems to bother you all is that I am self-aware. I know my strengths and also know my weaknesses. I am comfortable with who I am and proud of my achievements. I am not going to downplay that in order to make members of the collective hive mind here feel better about themselves.

    Now, I am going to get another cup of coffee and go work on my deck overlooking the beautiful Pacific Ocean in Southern California.
    Also, if you genuinely don't care what people think, why do you keep responding?

  • Jan 8

    Quote from FullGlass
    You know, you all remind me of high school. No, not even that. It's more like middle school. Guess what? I do not live my life based on what other people think of me or what they think I should do. Never have, never will. It's incredibly liberating - you all should try it sometime. Especially since I see posts on this forum from many students, RNs, and NPs who agonize over what other people think, even making career choices based on what their peers say, as opposed to going with their heart, only to end up regretting their choice.

    Now, since I have a lot of prior career success, let me share something with you. Women (and most of you are women) really handicap themselves by trying to be "good girls," "nice," "modest," and "get along with everyone." That attitude is why women often do not get paid equally to men or get promoted as quickly as men. At work, men do not try to be humble or obsess over what their peers think. They think not if they CAN do the job, but if they COULD do the job. Once I adopted that mindset I started getting paid as much or more than my male counterparts and my career path started on a steep upwards trajectory.

    My original post started very clearly that I am nothing special. Go and reread it. As people began criticizing me, I defended myself. Somehow, that just made some of you even more upset. Why? Because I did not kowtow to you?

    I AM a very accomplished person. In order to get a job, one must interview well and sell oneself and one's accomplishments. I don't go into an interview trying to downplay myself. If I did, I would not have received any job offers.

    What seems to bother you all is that I am self-aware. I know my strengths and also know my weaknesses. I am comfortable with who I am and proud of my achievements. I am not going to downplay that in order to make members of the collective hive mind here feel better about themselves.

    Now, I am going to get another cup of coffee and go work on my deck overlooking the beautiful Pacific Ocean in Southern California.
    Also, if you genuinely don't care what people think, why do you keep responding?

  • Jan 8

    Quote from FullGlass
    I see posts on this forum from many students, RNs, and NPs who agonize over what other people think, even making career choices based on what their peers say, as opposed to going with their heart, only to end up regretting their choice.
    You'll find a lot of those "go with your heart" and never follow advice or feedback folks over in the student and first year after licensing forums. Spoiler: it's not pretty.

  • Jan 8

    Quote from FullGlass
    You know, you all remind me of high school. No, not even that. It's more like middle school. Guess what? I do not live my life based on what other people think of me or what they think I should do. Never have, never will. It's incredibly liberating - you all should try it sometime. Especially since I see posts on this forum from many students, RNs, and NPs who agonize over what other people think, even making career choices based on what their peers say, as opposed to going with their heart, only to end up regretting their choice.

    Now, since I have a lot of prior career success, let me share something with you. Women (and most of you are women) really handicap themselves by trying to be "good girls," "nice," "modest," and "get along with everyone." That attitude is why women often do not get paid equally to men or get promoted as quickly as men. At work, men do not try to be humble or obsess over what their peers think. They think not if they CAN do the job, but if they COULD do the job. Once I adopted that mindset I started getting paid as much or more than my male counterparts and my career path started on a steep upwards trajectory.

    My original post started very clearly that I am nothing special. Go and reread it. As people began criticizing me, I defended myself. Somehow, that just made some of you even more upset. Why? Because I did not kowtow to you?

    I AM a very accomplished person. In order to get a job, one must interview well and sell oneself and one's accomplishments. I don't go into an interview trying to downplay myself. If I did, I would not have received any job offers.

    What seems to bother you all is that I am self-aware. I know my strengths and also know my weaknesses. I am comfortable with who I am and proud of my achievements. I am not going to downplay that in order to make members of the collective hive mind here feel better about themselves.

    Now, I am going to get another cup of coffee and go work on my deck overlooking the beautiful Pacific Ocean in Southern California.
    Also, if you genuinely don't care what people think, why do you keep responding?

  • Dec 31 '17

    I learned very, very quickly that you can't save patients from themselves. That, to me, was no big deal. The hardest thing? When the patient DOES want to save themselves, but there are literally no resources available to make them successful at it.

  • Dec 31 '17

    I learned very, very quickly that you can't save patients from themselves. That, to me, was no big deal. The hardest thing? When the patient DOES want to save themselves, but there are literally no resources available to make them successful at it.


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