Content That No Stars In My Eyes Likes

No Stars In My Eyes 33,620 Views

Hi! Thanks for checking out my page. I've been a member of allnurses since Apr 8th, '11. I have no blogs or journals to follow, but you are welcome to find me on the threads I follow, where I love humor and silliness to counter the seriousness of life. Feel free to chime in. Currently work PD/Geriatrics.

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  • Dec 7

    4th grader: "I'm sweating"
    Me: "Where are you coming from?"
    4th grader: "Gym"

    Who gave this kid a pass?

  • Dec 7

    Can you iron my Girl Scout vest? It's too wrinkly for my meeting tonight...
    Nope, sorry kiddo

  • Dec 6

    Our office is part of a larger health care network. "ACME" health network policy is that any patient who has more than 2 narcotic prescriptions written for chronic pain are required to sign a controlled medication contract. Patients are subject to random drug screen tests at any time. You can also be asked to bring your prescription bottle in for a pill count at any time. It is pretty much standard operating procedures anymore. It stinks for those who are following the rules, but a few bad apples have ruined it for everyone.

  • Dec 6

    I prefer to deescalate situations rather than press assault charges. (Not all of my coworkers agree)
    I believe that deescalation is a skill worth developing. Personally, I've benefits from classes based on CPI. Check out what's in your area.
    Crisis Prevention Institute (CPI Training) | CPI

    I also carry license insurance through NSO (though I've never needed to make a claim, so can't vouch for them one way or the other). Things can go wrong even if you have done everything right. www.nso.com

  • Dec 6

    Also, some people who have been a nurse 20 years will have 20 years of nursing experience. Some will have one year of experience repeated 20 times.
    Be the first one. Keep reading, studying, learning, improving your practice. It doesn't end with orientation. Be a learner and a self improver for good.


    -ICU/ED/former teacher/future flight nurse.

  • Dec 6

    Quote from No Stars In My Eyes
    Don't think this is a 'hack', just a warning from the voice of experience. If you have a tube feeding to do, and cough medicine is part of the meds you are to give, make double sure you've got ALL the feeding out of the g-tube. I just poured it in on top of the feeding, thinking it would just go on down like everything does. Well, it didn't. It solidified. Coca-cola did not work, nor any other soda. Suction and/or pushing a bolus did not work. Just remember that cough syrup and G-tube formula turn almost to cement. Don't try to shortcut like I did.

    An easy way to fully clear the feeding out of the G-tube is to introduce a small air bubble through the med port. It only needs to take up about 1mm of the tube. If you separate the feeding in the tube from the water flush, even by only 1mm, the tube will clear.

    You know that amount of air in the stomach is never going to matter.

  • Dec 6

    I have certainly been in that foley bind. The solution sounds doable and less traumatic than fishing around for Waldo. Anyway, it your description is brilliant and ever so funny.

  • Dec 6

    Quote from hherrn
    Nursing hack?
    I assume you mean an un orthodox short cut.
    Suction.

    Depending on the breathalyzer unit- PT too hammered to blow. Place mouthpiece in pts mouth. Have somebody manually squeeze lips to create seal. Put suction on exhaust end, pulling a breath through the breathalyzer.

    I can't advocate this next one, but the person who passed it on said it works.

    Obese male needs a foley, but you can't find Waldo. The gopher isn't sticking his head up. You know it has to be in there somewhere, but you can't find it.
    60 cc cath (not Luer) syringe. Remove plunger. Hook suction to small end of syringe. Place other end on the gopher hole. Apply suction. Grab that thing by the neck as soon as it sticks it's head up.

  • Dec 5

    Today the speech therapist, across from my office, killed a fly during a session - a student in that session then came to me to ask me "Can you please throw out the gross fly?". The student is just too cute so I did remove the fly. Then he and the other 2 students cheered and one said "Thanks, you saved the day!"

  • Dec 5

    When I worked in middle school, had a girl come to my office because she spilled water in her back pack. She passed at least 2 bathrooms with paper towels to get to me.

  • Nov 28

    Quote from OhioBPH
    This is one that I HATE. I am not good at repairing glasses, I can never get the screws in. I do have better tape for genuinely broken frames, though.
    I gave up on those tiny little screws a couple of years ago. I can barely see them, and my not so skinny fingers make it extremely difficult to even get the thing in the proper place. I now use dental floss to repair them until they get home. It's strong, it threads right through, and it can be easily clipped with nail clippers when they can be properly repaired.

  • Nov 28

    Quote from OhioBPH
    This is one that I HATE. I am not good at repairing glasses, I can never get the screws in. I do have better tape for genuinely broken frames, though.
    I am getting to the age where I can't even see the darn screws to fix the glasses

  • Nov 28

    Not a school nurse, but I did have a patient demand that I call his girlfriend and tell her he never wanted to see her again. (18 or 19 year old patient in ICU).

  • Nov 28

    Quote from JenTheSchoolRN
    Interesting example! I work closely with a counselor that holds all students accountable for their actions and I do the same (as does my school). Sure they can feel the way they feel, but what they choose to do with those feelings may have consequences and they need to ready to accept them, negative or positive.

    Frankly, I'm trying to soak up as much mental health PD as I can.
    They are the minority. The local mental health hospital made no mention of the attempted murder he did a year ago to land him there. When asked why, they answered they wanted to focus on the feelings, not the actions. I asked if that would take away his accountability and they said "of course it will, but he needs to have a handle on his feelings before we can ask him to control himself". Wow! I just asked could I sue them if he hurt or killed one of my children when released?

  • Nov 28

    Quote from MrNurse(x2)
    The real crisis is the mental health shortage, both pediatric and adult. However, the inner crisis is the shift from accountable counseling to the victim entitlement now being propagated by the progressive psychiatrists. I have first hand exposure as a child I took in had an old school counselor who held him accountable for his actions, she retired and his young new counselor tells him his acting out is totally the result of his anger towards his mom with no accountability. He now believes he has no control over his anger and is free to lash out without repercussion. She doesn't correct him when he says this. Wonder how many shooters have this experience with mental health providers before they snap?
    Interesting example! I work closely with a counselor that holds all students accountable for their actions and I do the same (as does my school). Sure they can feel the way they feel, but what they choose to do with those feelings may have consequences and they need to be ready to accept them, negative or positive.

    Frankly, I'm trying to soak up as much mental health PD as I can.


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