Content That NurseOnAMotorcycle Likes

Content That NurseOnAMotorcycle Likes

NurseOnAMotorcycle 16,736 Views

Joined Jan 16, '11 - from 'NY'. She has '6' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Med-Surg 1, Emergency 5, CEN 2/2016'. Posts: 1,094 (63% Liked) Likes: 2,924

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  • Sep 19

    There are nurses on AN that say they are actively working different jobs as both medics and RNs.

  • Sep 18

    A crappy assignment is only a crappy assignment if you let it be one.

    Who makes the assignment? Charge? Manager?
    Just ask before everyone else gets there if you can try a different area that you are not normally assigned to. Just something like "hey, I have had rooms xxx for a few shifts in a row, can I have another assignment next shift to try something different".
    Not accusing anyone of anything, not saying you want a "better" area, just a different one than where you have been.

  • Sep 18

    Boston FNP, I still see the OP as venting to an anonymous entity here rather than speaking to her husband to let him know where she stands. Then came the responses that this is somehow a competition to see who is the better nurse. There is dysfunction all over this thread, both OP and responses. No wonder marriages are crying out in death groans with attitudes like these. Is it really that difficult?

  • Sep 18

    Find it hilarious that this has come down to a competition that she must win. Poor position for a safe marriage. Feel sad for those married that feel this way. No wonder divorce is so easy.

  • Sep 18

    My heart goes out to you. Your feelings are valid and you have gotten some really good advice from fellow posters.
    Can I just add my two cents? Get a housekeeper. Not directly related, but it will really help.

  • Sep 18

    Career resentment can destroy your marriage. I would suggest that if you can not sit down and iron out a family plan for both of your careers as well as your family life, then perhaps marriage counseling may be in order, before festering sores overwhelm your family.

  • Sep 11

    I highly doubt they were wearing body cams. I personally would never go to a hospital (by choice) knowing they recoded my care.

    What you describe sounds like possibly Voceras or some other radio/phone device. A Vocera is small and black and usually snapped on to the collar of scrubs in order to better pick up your voice when talking to whoever you call.

    Wearing a body can seems like it would be a violation of privacy and require consent from patients. I just don't see very many patients being ok with being recorded.

  • Sep 9

    Like others have stated, I can definitely see both sides of the underlying dilemma here. However, I do NOT consider speaking a native tongue, regardless of the fact that they aren't in their native country, as being rude. If you think it is rude then you are being sensitive and dramatic, which you indirectly admitted to when you said you feel left out. You could also feel left out by two English speaking nurses sitting right next to each other whispering, or intentionally using inside jokes, etc. So the language that is being spoken is irrelevant. If you feel the need to be a part of every single conversation so you don't feel left out, try actually talking to them and engaging them in conversation. Simple as that.

  • Sep 9

    Quote from oceanblue52
    I have to wonder if this policy is partially based on location. I have worked in healthcare facilities in both Philadelphia and Denver metro (a lot of ethnic diversity in both areas), and have never heard of such a policy. This did come up in the news about 10-15 years ago because a highschool in Arizona wanted to ban Spanish language (e.g. native speakers talking to,each other in the hallways) in school. It was a hotly debated topic, and I'm not sure there was ever a satisfactory conclusion to the issue.

    I think it is one thing to speak in a separate language in front of a patient, and another in front of a colleague. A patient should always be included in the conversation, at least while in the room and within earshot. From a workers perspective, and in extreme cases it could lead to gossip and bullying, but that is probably not the case here. If you feel strongly about the policy, talk directly to your co-workers. Unless a patient is directly involved, this does not seem appropriate to bring to management.

    When you look at the history of America, you know that Europeans brutally conquered America and subjugated the native peoples. Part of this subjugation included forcing children of the native peoples to attend schools taught by Europeans.

    These schools required that native tongues and dress and religious practices and probably a lot more be abandoned, banned.

    Some of these peoples have been able to throw off some of the bonds inflicted upon their ancestors and have found their roots - their native language, customs, and so on. I would be reluctant to once again ban any native language.

    However, there has to be mutual respect; respect on both sides. This is the problem with racial awakening. There is a lot of anger and it comes out against people who have never been rude to or repressive of anyone. This is wrong. It causes much hurt, hate, and pain on both sides. it turns someone who would befriend us into an enemy. It does to some, who have never hated anyone or felt superior to anyone, that which others who want revenge for what was done to their forefathers.

    There needs to be a balance. It's easier said than done. We have to try, though.

  • Sep 9

    Quote from BellaCat
    btw: it wasn't a private conversation.. if it was, I and other nurses wouldn't hear it. it's a public conversation where other non-Filipino nurses can hear and it truly made the rest of us uncomfortable, and esp when we know they were talking about the patients and their conditions and the doctors' orders.
    Are they talking about YOUR patients? Are physician orders being missed or not carried out? Are they carrying out shift change report in English? As long as relevant staff receives pertinent info and the patient is well cared for, I don't really see what there is to be upset about.

  • Sep 9

    I bet it is a relief to them to be able to speak their native language with someone. I can't imagine how difficult it would be to always have to speak a second/unfamiliar language all the time....just sayin'

  • Sep 9

    First off; what is a "universal" language? Doesn't that depend on where you are?

    Second: perhaps they are talking about something that has NOTHING to do with you. I do have to wonder why you are so concerned about their conversations. Do you believe that you should be privy to everyones conversations? It's not rude, what is rude is eavesdropping. Unless they are directly addressing you, I don't think it's rude. Don't concern yourself with the affairs of others.

    And I do know that my facility has NOTHING about only speaking a "universal" language at the nurses station.

  • Sep 9

    Nothing hurts like losing one of your own, in your "home." Get help to process this if you need it, OP. Even when we don't know them it's not easy.

  • Sep 9

    You will be fine, just watch all Boswell videos on youtube, they are amazing. What a nice guy for posting them all for free for others to use. I can tell you for fact there is no free comprehensive CCRN review material. I think Boswell has the best overview of the test

  • Sep 9

    Well, for some reason, they must feel that they are "not enough" and need to inflate themselves to others.


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