Content That NurseOnAMotorcycle Likes

Content That NurseOnAMotorcycle Likes

NurseOnAMotorcycle 15,019 Views

Joined Jan 16, '11 - from 'NY'. She has '6' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Med-Surg 1, Emergency 5, CEN 2/2016'. Posts: 1,042 (62% Liked) Likes: 2,689

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  • May 30

    I'm morbidly obese. Any pants I put on, be they scrub pants, slacks, cargo pants, etx are, by default, big boy pants.

  • May 30

    We would treat both. Head CT to rule out bleed. Urine tox screen, tylenol and salicylate levels, etoh level, contact with poison center, IV fluids, oxygen, possibly treat the bradycardia, check electrolytes, CBC, maybe a LP if looks infectious

  • May 30

    Sounds like somebody slipped something in her drink.

  • May 30

    First focus in such a scenario would be correcting immediate life threats (ABCs). Fix the oxygenation issues, hypotension, and bradycardia, and ultimately stabilize for CT to check that noggin. Tox screens (UA and ETOH), and don't ever forget to check a dexy (blood sugar, Accucheck, glucose, whatever you call it in your area) on your unconscious/unresponsive peeps.

  • May 30

    I used to have an hour commute. It sucked but I never fell asleep. Just make sure you get a nap in on the day of your first night shift so you're not so tired in the drive home. My co-workers offered to let me start at their houses when I was doing my long commute so that could be a possibility. I definitely wouldn't pay for a hotel.

  • May 29

    Wow, I'm sorry, I don't think you did anything wrong. The desk RN was responsible at that point, if she is the one who was with the patient when you left the room. She should've handed back off to you if she couldn't stay, and she didn't communicate to you that she was leaving- if I am understanding this correctly. Also, she is the one who called 911. Keep us posted if anything else
    develops.

  • May 29

    Quote from blueskyy
    This is an update from my other post, today I got the call and was terminated due to failure to remain in the patient room.
    I am so very sorry that your employment was terminated. Working the floor is becoming a lose/lose situation these days. Good luck to you.

  • May 29

    Check the policy manual (my guess is that there is nothing which requires you to wear your hair in a certain style or length, but rather speaks to interference with procedures or similar).
    If the manager asks you about your hair again ask him/her to put that request in writing.
    Look for another job.

  • May 29

    I just got a phone call from a 7p-7a application I submitted yesterday for an interview tomorrow I am so excited so so glad I posted on here to get some more info on what to expect! Woohoo

  • May 29

    I hate that night shift is treated like the redheaded stepchild. Shared governance harps that we are never there, but they hold meetings at 11:00 on Wednesdays. I've suggested a couple different options, ie 8:00 or 17:00, but those just "aren't convenient." I suggested alternating meeting times every month, but that wasn't acceptable either. The manager does "associate rounding" but heaven forbid she be there at a time that I can stop in.

    And like others have said, the whole customer service thing is out of control. I'm sorry you don't like it when your IV pump beeps every 45 minutes because the physician has ordered a different antibiotic to be hung every 2 hours, but I'm a little too busy to hang out outside your room and watch the clock to catch it before it is finsished.

  • May 29

    The "customer is always right" attitude.

    No-- they're not always right.

  • May 29

    I have noticed this trend throughout nursing in recent years, with the exception of one of the Big Two dialysis companies that trained me very, very thoroughly for several weeks to do acute dialysis.

    Judging by what you say about your new work environment, I wonder if your preceptor is using her FMLA not to prove how indispensable she is, but to scoot on out of the company without having to face management. I have seen other nurses do this when they want to leave a position but are afraid to out and out quit. They take FMLA for this or that and then just never return.

    Anyway, I feel for you. I just left a triage job where I had an abbreviated orientation, although longer than yours, and I was also told to rely on my notes. It was very rocky at first, and I so wanted to quit. It did get better with time, but I ultimately didn't enjoy the work and ironically, as my situation is the exact opposite of yours, I chose to return to dialysis nursing, only to chronic instead of acute dialysis because the hours in acutes will absolutely kill you, body and soul, if you don't work in a well run program, which I did not. I am going to work for the "other" dialysis company this time, and so far it sounds really good. However, if they try to short me on orientation because I have dialysis experience, I am going to let them know that I won't tolerate that. Your orientation is the basis for your overall experience, job satisfaction, feeling of competence, etc., etc. at a job and I think these "abbreviated to save money" orientations like you are describing undermine all of those things.

    I wish I could help, I can imagine how awful it feels. You have dialysis experience, just wondering if you would consider working in a chronic dialysis unit if there is one nearby? Stable hours, no Sundays or holidays, and you are already competent in the dynamics of dialysis. I have worked for many different companies in my career, and so far the Big Two dialysis companies seem to give the best training.

    Best of everything to you, whatever you decide to do.

  • May 29

    Not interested in doing physical labor?!? Good grief that sounds entitled. CNA work is basic nursing care, and something you should be doing regardless of whether an aide is there to help you. Don't think for one second that the physical labor is beneath you and not part of your job description. Quitting on the spot is unprofessional and the same ranks as patient abandonment. Good luck trying to explain why you left your shift and how you were too above doing basic nursing care.

  • May 27

    With your background it sounds like you'll fit in well. Your psych experience will be used often.

  • May 22

    In my er, "need anything?" Is one of the most often said things you'll hear. We also practice the "dog pile on the rabbit" approach when the genuinely sick pt rolls in.


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