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MunoRN 34,449 Views

Joined Nov 18, '10. Posts: 7,690 (69% Liked) Likes: 18,827

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  • 7:01 pm

    Quote from brillohead
    Just be diligent with your hand-washing.

    Fomites, fomites, fomites!

    You're only going to get it if you eat someone else's poop, and the best way to avoid doing that is to make sure you're washing your hands properly every time you touch anything going near your lips.
    Up until recently that was thought to be it's primary route of transmission, but more recent evidence shows that it's often airborne and is frequently present in sufficient concentrations in the air not only in patient rooms, but also hallways, nursing stations, entire cruise ships, etc.
    Noroviruses may spread through the air - CBS News

  • 4:21 pm

    Quote from VANurse2010
    This is far enough in advance that you should just find a new job and quit. I'm a little put off by all the advocates for putting the unit before your life, but that's the lay of (some people's) land I guess.
    I would agree that as nurses we need to be willing to walk away from any job, but I'm skeptical that the OP would have any better luck securing specific multi-week vacation at the peak of summer PTO time as a new-hire, even at the most employee-friendly places.

  • 1:50 pm

    If your manager hired you when you were 23 weeks pregnant and then you took time off when the baby was born then you don't actually qualify for any FMLA covered time off, since that would have only been about 4 months on the job.

  • 1:41 pm

    It's not unheard of for nursing school faculty to teach things that are absurdly false, this isn't completely without value in nursing school since one of the main things it needs to teach students is how to think critically, and the ability to recognize when your teacher is full of crap is one way to learn critical thinking.

    There are no universal regulatory requirements on how PRN orders are interpreted, the general rule is that how they are going to be interpreted is understood in the same way by those writing the orders and those interpreting and implementing the orders. For instance, if a facility allows no wiggle room, the providers need to be aware that patients will typically be getting their prns less frequently than what they order, so they may need to adjust the time frames accordingly.

  • 12:14 pm

    It actually seems like common sense to me. Surplus supply of opiates in the home is a major contributor to opiate abuse and addiction, so it's totally reasonable to avoid those surplus supplies as much as possible, and giving people a 30 day of supply when they often only require a few days to a week of opiates is where most of those extra opiates come from.

    I would agree it's impractical if it requires a face-to-face with the prescriber, but it doesn't, in only requires a phone call, and if it applied to all refills, which it doesn't, it only applies to the first time the opiate is filled.

  • 3:52 am

    Quote from VANurse2010
    This is far enough in advance that you should just find a new job and quit. I'm a little put off by all the advocates for putting the unit before your life, but that's the lay of (some people's) land I guess.
    I would agree that as nurses we need to be willing to walk away from any job, but I'm skeptical that the OP would have any better luck securing specific multi-week vacation at the peak of summer PTO time as a new-hire, even at the most employee-friendly places.

  • Jan 22

    It's not unheard of for nursing school faculty to teach things that are absurdly false, this isn't completely without value in nursing school since one of the main things it needs to teach students is how to think critically, and the ability to recognize when your teacher is full of crap is one way to learn critical thinking.

    There are no universal regulatory requirements on how PRN orders are interpreted, the general rule is that how they are going to be interpreted is understood in the same way by those writing the orders and those interpreting and implementing the orders. For instance, if a facility allows no wiggle room, the providers need to be aware that patients will typically be getting their prns less frequently than what they order, so they may need to adjust the time frames accordingly.

  • Jan 22

    Quote from VANurse2010
    This is far enough in advance that you should just find a new job and quit. I'm a little put off by all the advocates for putting the unit before your life, but that's the lay of (some people's) land I guess.
    I would agree that as nurses we need to be willing to walk away from any job, but I'm skeptical that the OP would have any better luck securing specific multi-week vacation at the peak of summer PTO time as a new-hire, even at the most employee-friendly places.

  • Jan 22

    It's not unheard of for nursing school faculty to teach things that are absurdly false, this isn't completely without value in nursing school since one of the main things it needs to teach students is how to think critically, and the ability to recognize when your teacher is full of crap is one way to learn critical thinking.

    There are no universal regulatory requirements on how PRN orders are interpreted, the general rule is that how they are going to be interpreted is understood in the same way by those writing the orders and those interpreting and implementing the orders. For instance, if a facility allows no wiggle room, the providers need to be aware that patients will typically be getting their prns less frequently than what they order, so they may need to adjust the time frames accordingly.

  • Jan 22

    It's not unheard of for nursing school faculty to teach things that are absurdly false, this isn't completely without value in nursing school since one of the main things it needs to teach students is how to think critically, and the ability to recognize when your teacher is full of crap is one way to learn critical thinking.

    There are no universal regulatory requirements on how PRN orders are interpreted, the general rule is that how they are going to be interpreted is understood in the same way by those writing the orders and those interpreting and implementing the orders. For instance, if a facility allows no wiggle room, the providers need to be aware that patients will typically be getting their prns less frequently than what they order, so they may need to adjust the time frames accordingly.

  • Jan 21

    It's not unheard of for nursing school faculty to teach things that are absurdly false, this isn't completely without value in nursing school since one of the main things it needs to teach students is how to think critically, and the ability to recognize when your teacher is full of crap is one way to learn critical thinking.

    There are no universal regulatory requirements on how PRN orders are interpreted, the general rule is that how they are going to be interpreted is understood in the same way by those writing the orders and those interpreting and implementing the orders. For instance, if a facility allows no wiggle room, the providers need to be aware that patients will typically be getting their prns less frequently than what they order, so they may need to adjust the time frames accordingly.

  • Jan 20

    You may not necessarily see an overwhelming preference for 12 shifts when it comes to day shifters, it's working nights where 8 and 12 hour shifts schedules aren't even comparable. Because of this, most day shifters have to yield to what's better for nightshifters, even if that means working 12 hour shifts so nightshifters can also work 12 hour shifts, which helps them live longer, get enough sleep, get adequate recovery time, stay sane, etc.

  • Jan 18

    If your manager hired you when you were 23 weeks pregnant and then you took time off when the baby was born then you don't actually qualify for any FMLA covered time off, since that would have only been about 4 months on the job.

  • Jan 17

    I'm disturbed how common wasting 10ml is. Keep in mind blood draws and wastes are the main cause of iatrogenic anemia, which is largest cause of blood loss in hospitalized patients.

    2-3 times the lumen volume is sufficient, additional waste provides no additional benefit. A power lumen on a PICC has the largest volume and is 1.7 ml. Non-power lumens are less than 1 ml.

  • Jan 16

    We don't use that particular brand, but in general I'm glad that these are around. I don't mind being reminded when I'm using my 'midnight-at-the-bar' voice instead of my midnight-in-the-hospital voice, and helping visitors be aware of their noise level is also pretty important. Is there a belief that we shouldn't try and limit excessive noise in the hospital environment?


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