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MunoRN 37,666 Views

Joined Nov 18, '10 - from '.'. MunoRN is a Critical Care. She has '10' year(s) of experience. Posts: 7,790 (69% Liked) Likes: 19,268

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  • 4:36 am

    The "Gauge" measurement system is based on a measurement of how much of something it takes to weigh a certain amount. I believe this started with old gun ammunition. For instance, a 12 gauge shot is considered 12 gauge because it takes 12 of them to weigh 1 pound. Smaller shot would require more shot to weigh 1 pound: so it would have a higher number even though it is smaller.

    A pretty outdated unit of measurement but it's what we've got.

  • Mar 27

    To start with, "TID" and "q 8 hours" are not the same thing, if a patient got a dose rescheduled to coincide with surgery then the next dose would be according to the TID schedule, not 8 hours from the OR dose, so that's not actually an error.

    I would say that even with super-nurse, having 12-13 hospitalized patients makes bedtime eyedrops a roll of the dice, consider yourself lucky if you get them.

    I'd say with your workload, your errors don't represent a practice that falls clearly below typical abilities.

  • Mar 26

    To start with, "TID" and "q 8 hours" are not the same thing, if a patient got a dose rescheduled to coincide with surgery then the next dose would be according to the TID schedule, not 8 hours from the OR dose, so that's not actually an error.

    I would say that even with super-nurse, having 12-13 hospitalized patients makes bedtime eyedrops a roll of the dice, consider yourself lucky if you get them.

    I'd say with your workload, your errors don't represent a practice that falls clearly below typical abilities.

  • Mar 26

    What you're describing is a delayed sensitivity reaction, not an IgE mediated allergic reaction. Based on the Antibiotic Stewardship programs everywhere that I've worked, this wouldn't justify a switch to another antibiotic since this doesn't signal a potential life threatening reaction, if the rash is poorly tolerated then they might add benadryl or also famotidine, but they would need to stay with that antibiotic. Rashes aren't fun, but antibiotic resistance due to misuse is a very serious problem.

  • Mar 23

    If I was in your shoes and handing off a comfort-measures-only patient to another nurse who felt that something needed to be done about the patient's O2 sat of 45, I would hesitate to give them that patient, instead I would suggest they not take this or any other comfort care patients until they had the proper training.

  • Mar 23

    If I was in your shoes and handing off a comfort-measures-only patient to another nurse who felt that something needed to be done about the patient's O2 sat of 45, I would hesitate to give them that patient, instead I would suggest they not take this or any other comfort care patients until they had the proper training.

  • Mar 23

    If I was in your shoes and handing off a comfort-measures-only patient to another nurse who felt that something needed to be done about the patient's O2 sat of 45, I would hesitate to give them that patient, instead I would suggest they not take this or any other comfort care patients until they had the proper training.

  • Mar 23

    If I was in your shoes and handing off a comfort-measures-only patient to another nurse who felt that something needed to be done about the patient's O2 sat of 45, I would hesitate to give them that patient, instead I would suggest they not take this or any other comfort care patients until they had the proper training.

  • Mar 23
    From booradley In ER

    Quote from russianbear
    You have a lot to learn yet. And you will learn these things in nursing school. In a trauma if the patient needs blood you begin infusing oh negative. Prior to that, however, you would have drawn blood it to type and screen. Once those results are in you than administer the same type of blood. Antibodies, etc.
    I guess I wasn't clear, so again, in an emergent situation where we don't have a current crossmatch we give O negative blood, we would not give a patient a different type based on the patient or family telling us what the patient's blood type is before the crossmatch is done, which is what the OP's question was. Maybe you could clarify what you're disagreeing with.

  • Mar 23

    If I was in your shoes and handing off a comfort-measures-only patient to another nurse who felt that something needed to be done about the patient's O2 sat of 45, I would hesitate to give them that patient, instead I would suggest they not take this or any other comfort care patients until they had the proper training.

  • Mar 23

    If I was in your shoes and handing off a comfort-measures-only patient to another nurse who felt that something needed to be done about the patient's O2 sat of 45, I would hesitate to give them that patient, instead I would suggest they not take this or any other comfort care patients until they had the proper training.

  • Mar 23

    If I was in your shoes and handing off a comfort-measures-only patient to another nurse who felt that something needed to be done about the patient's O2 sat of 45, I would hesitate to give them that patient, instead I would suggest they not take this or any other comfort care patients until they had the proper training.

  • Mar 22

    I would say you need to balance how much you enjoy working on this unit with the benefits of looking out for your health. The health effects of night shift on you would appear to be more immediate and apparent than in most nurses, but keep in mind working night shift is a significant health risk to all nurses, it's a known cause of cancer, heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. As a result, arguing for reasonable accommodation isn't likely to get very far since skipping over someone else's place in line to get off nights or rotating shifts would negatively affect that employee, which would make the accommodation unreasonable.

  • Mar 22

    Quote from Bellaisla
    Comes a time....when the federal bloat has to be reigned in. The time has come, the time is now. Party's over, we broke, folks. Can't just keep printing money.
    I agree that we need a more fiscally responsible federal government, but I'm not sure how you think that's the direction we're heading in.

    Assuming Trump and House/Senate republicans' plans go as they hope, we'll be tripling our deficit spending. Normally, our deficit spending runs about 2-3% of GDP, going up to 4 or 5% of GDP would be normally be considered a big increase, there are occasional individual years where it's up closer to 9%, such as 2008-2009 which occurred in the setting of the recession, bailouts, and tax cuts but even then that was only a single year. What potentially lies ahead of us now is a deficit that is 10% of GDP and it won't just be for one year, it will be every year.

  • Mar 21

    I would say you need to balance how much you enjoy working on this unit with the benefits of looking out for your health. The health effects of night shift on you would appear to be more immediate and apparent than in most nurses, but keep in mind working night shift is a significant health risk to all nurses, it's a known cause of cancer, heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. As a result, arguing for reasonable accommodation isn't likely to get very far since skipping over someone else's place in line to get off nights or rotating shifts would negatively affect that employee, which would make the accommodation unreasonable.


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