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OCNRN63, RN 40,036 Views

Joined Aug 27, '10. Posts: 7,191 (75% Liked) Likes: 27,723

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  • Mar 15

    You mentioned "classes" that the BON suggested you do. These wouldn't be alcohol or drug-related rehabilitation-type classes, would they?

  • Mar 15

    Yes, I have trouble with BON and haven't signed an agreement yet to do classess, etc. instead of fighting for my license or going through their hoops, I would just surrender it. I just feel that, from the very first day of being an RN plus my bad experience with other ******* RNs, this is not what I want. I'm not happy. I don't wanna live with a lot of worries when I come home especially when going to work. I just don't want the responsibility. I know I can make more in private caregiving because I know the family although I work more hours than my current job. My job right now doesn't pay much as an entry level plus too much stress and pressure involve. Also, my job doesn't have benefits at all.

  • Mar 15

    Ooh, sorry, futurenaijaRN, but you are incorrect about this. As noted above, this is one of the very first questions we have to ask. https://www.dli.mn.gov/WC/PDF/interp_2_2.pdf is an excellent summary of the Federal requirements around limited English proficiency and some states have additional requirements.

  • Mar 15

    I see nothing wrong with the question. Just answer yes or no.
    Its better than spending time asking questions and getting incorrect/wrong answers because the person doesn't understand everything.

  • Mar 15

    That actually should be one of the very first questions a patient is asked.

  • Mar 15

    Such a sad and compassionate story. Much harder when a friend is involved. Nursing is an emotional and not just a physical job. You gotta be a special person to do this job. ��

  • Mar 12

    A while back there were a couple of posters on here making a case for GFM accounts to pay for their nursing school. You see, they didn't want to work AND go to school.

  • Mar 9

    Wow, I am really sorry to hear all you went through! Personally I would take this up with HR and request a meeting with a supervisor. This seems a bit ridiculous that they'd terminate you over that.

  • Mar 2

    I've been following an OB doc on FB who had been writing about this for awhile. Her mantra is "Fed is Best" She isn't against breastfeeding but thinks we've gone to far in promoting it without considering repercussions.

    The lactivist lie that causes so many babies to suffer | The Skeptical OB

    Hungry babies are suffering babies. Most mothers understand that instinctively and want to ease their babies’ pain by supplementing. Lactivists prefer to let babies scream. Instead lactivists falsely reassure mothers with products that graphically represent a believe a lie.
    That’s not merely wrong and dangerous to infant health; it is insupportably cruel.

  • Feb 20

    I would not go to work on a Sunday waving a letter that told me not to practice.

    I would rather take the hit of a call off gossip than advertising the do not practice letter to regular staff.

    This needs to be presented to the right level of management which is unlikely to be there on Sunday morning.

    I can't imagine how complicated this may or may not be but I think trying to 'work' even as an observer is not a good move.

  • Feb 10

    Let's please try to remember that there ARE a multitude of different
    types of settings. The OP possibly does work in a facility where it
    is possible to sit down for a few minutes or perhaps longer with her
    patient.

    I know that I do, and I consider myself very very lucky, after some
    of the fiery pits of hell that I have worked in previously.

  • Feb 7

    Quote from foggnm
    I didn't read through your whole post, but if you're discontent with your preceptor, ask for a different one. You are right that orientation in ICUs and ERs is generally not pleasant or enjoyable, but there is only one way to fix it: either live with it or ask for a change. If your preceptor is truly being a difficult/unprofessional person then you should report it. It is just a job and you're entitled to work with pleasant professional people without being harassed or belittled. You could also confront your preceptor directly about your concerns (which would be my first tact) and see if she can accommodate your needs. I don't know what to tell you except nursing can be a weird environment. Just stay professional, learn, be good to yourself, be good to your patients, and everything will work out.
    What, really? I find this the complete opposite. At least on my unit all of our preceptors are awesome and experienced nurses. Probably a little bit OCD about how they like things...but i had a great orientation. Although i was mostly with 1 preceptor i sometimes changed days and was placed with other nurses...all who were great.

  • Feb 7

    Quote from vanessaem
    I just don't understand why some of you feel that anyone who is "new" should put up with foul treatment from older staff members. Nursing as a profession is stressful enough for all sorts of other reasons. No one has time to deal with toxic, bullying behavior from coworkers. Being rotten and disgusting towards fellow staff is not cute nor should it be tolerated. We're all supposed to be grown people here.

    As a preceptor, they are there to teach and/or lead by example and if not, get out. Some of these folks act like someone forced them to take on this role. If that was the case, please don't take it out on the preceptee. They've got problems at home, with their job or with life in general? Please don't take it out on the preceptee. They're not there to be their personal punching bag. They are there to earn a living just like them.

    No, the OP should not have to suck it up and just take it. And so what if she's not liked by others for standing up for herself? This is a job not a popularity contest. That preceptor was unprofessional and unhelpful. The OP will never learn this way...period.
    No one should put up with continued foul treatment from another. But the OP is new, and she doesn't know if this is simply a good nurse, employee and preceptor going through a very bad time or someone with a perpetually sour outlook. The reality is that many preceptors ARE forced to take on the role. THIS particular situation looks like one in which there is such a dearth of qualified preceptors that they cannot even offer the OP a regular preceptor or three.

    I wish all the orientees out there who are expecting to be taught/mentored/led by example and if the preceptor isn't up to snuff they'll just go away would be as considerate of the preceptor's feelings as they expect the preceptor to be of theirs. Sometimes preceptors are living through truly awful life circumstances and they don't get a choice to NOT precept. Precepting makes a shift three times as difficult as just going in there and taking care of your own patients, and some preceptors just don't have the extra energy for that right now.

    The nurse who was back to work within two weeks of her son's suicide because she was the sole breadwinner for her family and she needed to keep up the health insurance because her husband was in ICU waiting for a transplant. The nurse who just moved her mother into her home with her because Mother has Alzheimer's and can no longer be trusted to live on her own -- but Mother wanders all day and all night and the nurse cannot get any sleep because mother will (has already proven she will) wander into danger. (I tried taking care of Mother at home -- trust me, Mother can get into life-threatening situations of her own making quicker than you can fall back to sleep after rescuing her from the last one.)

    Give every preceptor the benefit of the doubt; especially if you've only been with them once. You would want the preceptor to give YOU the benefit of the doubt.

  • Feb 7

    Quote from foggnm
    I didn't read through your whole post, but if you're discontent with your preceptor, ask for a different one. You are right that orientation in ICUs and ERs is generally not pleasant or enjoyable, but there is only one way to fix it: either live with it or ask for a change. If your preceptor is truly being a difficult/unprofessional person then you should report it. It is just a job and you're entitled to work with pleasant professional people without being harassed or belittled. You could also confront your preceptor directly about your concerns (which would be my first tact) and see if she can accommodate your needs. I don't know what to tell you except nursing can be a weird environment. Just stay professional, learn, be good to yourself, be good to your patients, and everything will work out.
    Your critical thinking needs work if you're thinking to offer advice on a post which you admit you haven't even read.

  • Jan 30

    I was sad, but guess what? The med/surg preceptorship (which was my second choice after NICU) helped TREMENDOUSLY with NCLEX prep (passed the first time, 75 questions in under 90 minutes). And, when I got my first job out of nursing school (which, like many other new grads, was in med/surg), I was able to hit the floor running with minimal training. Earned eight months of solid adult med/surg experience and now I just celebrated one year in the NICU.

    Although I was very upset, looking back at my experience, I am glad I started off in med/surg as it has made me appreciate the NICU SO much more than many of the nurses who know nothing but. I feel more well-rounded, and my resume is sure to start conversation (You are a med/surg nurse AND a NICU nurse? Say what?!?). To this day, I still work my med/surg job PRN as I know if I want ever want to advance my education or leave bedside nursing for family-friendlier hours, I will have more doors opened than not.

    So look at this as an opportunity to expand your knowledge base and be prepared to get a job in med/surg out of school. While I love working in babyland, it is very niche, hard to break into, and difficult to leave if you happen to not like it.


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