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OCNRN63, RN 40,696 Views

Joined Aug 27, '10. Posts: 7,193 (75% Liked) Likes: 27,758

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  • Apr 24

    Quote from Volley88
    Sorry I should clarify a few things

    1. Jon is known to be the party go-er in our unit. All my unit does, is talk about partying and going for 4/20.
    2. I have snapchat on my phone I saw him physically eating edibles on story.
    3. I showed the charge nurse, but she doesn't fully understand edibles. I would assume he deleted it after I confronted him.
    I noticed you neglected to explain how you happened to see his private text messages.

  • Apr 24

    Then, by all means, continue to ride herd on the personal behavior of your coworkers. No detriment to your own patients, we're sure. Less attention to your patients, more attention to other employees. Maybe management can create a new job title for this activity.

  • Apr 24

    Quote from Volley88
    Sorry I should clarify a few things

    1. Jon is known to be the party go-er in our unit. All my unit does, is talk about partying and going for 4/20.
    2. I have snapchat on my phone I saw him physically eating edibles on story.
    3. I showed the charge nurse, but she doesn't fully understand edibles. I would assume he deleted it after I confronted him.
    By going against what you say is the unit culture, you are only putting yourself in the target range of others. Again, best to mind your own business and leave others to their own concerns. If it does not involve imminent patient safety for the other nurse's patients, it does not need your involvement.

  • Apr 24

    So, your coworker helped you out multiple times during the shift and received nothing but compliments from his patients?

    No good deed goes unpunished, eh?

  • Apr 23

    Mind your business. He may now be gunning for you.

  • Apr 23

    Why are you snooping through someone's cell phone in the first place?

  • Apr 23

    So you happen to "see stuff on this persons phone" which seems like an invasion of privacy to me. This person did nothing to cause suspicion. His care was all outstanding. His charting was all good. He even was HELPING YOU! No one had anything bad to say about him, he gave you no reason to suspect he was high. But you saw something private on his phone and felt the need to go tell on him. Investigation was done and Jon was found to provide excellent care and charting and is clearly a team player. You then hear him joke with a co-worker and run to tell on him AGAIN after apologizing to him for telling on him the first time?


    I suggest you stay in your lane and mind your own business unless someone does something at work to cause concern and pt safety that isn't from you seeing private things on their phone or inside jokes with friends.

  • Apr 23

    You do nothing.

    There is absolutely no evidence besides heresay that "Jon" was high ... and that heresay was taken from Jon's private property (text messages) and a wink from a co-worker. That wink could have been directed at you, for all you know (Jon could have texted his friend about his "busybody co-worker" who accused him of some serious stuff).

    Your co-worker appeared to provide excellent care throughout the day, which appears to be the norm for him. Going out of your way to catch him is ridiculous, unless you have a legitimate reason to suspect him.

    You certainly did owe Jon an apology. You could have cost him his job ... over a guess. That's awful.

  • Apr 23

    I'm confused how you came to the conclusion that he "was high" when you've also pointed out that despite scrutinizing his work you found no evidence he was impaired.

  • Apr 13

    Quote from JackDawson23
    Good job! But I'm still scratching my head on the words "Warning and Graphic" in your title??? If you're trying to get hits on this page, it worked!
    To some, the description of an unconscious child gurgling as a first responder desperately tries to resuscitate, would be considered graphic. I imagine the OP was trying to warn people who might be especially sensitive to reading about such. Out of 100 some odd responses to the OP, yours was the only one without even a touch of empathy. Your response has me scratching my head, but to each their own.

  • Apr 13

    You say you are new but see everything wrong with eveyone else. I see a difficult work environment in your future

  • Apr 13

    You and I are not privy to this patient's medical information, therefore neither of us can judge the actions of her nurse. Also, in an emergency people work together. You should not have told the nurse "several" times that she was not your charge, you should have just quickly gotten the vitals.

  • Apr 13

    The parable of the ox in the well is applicable here. I would posit those in need of care are oxen- and by providing that care we rescue them from the well.

  • Apr 13

    Had I been bilingual, I would have used those talents to become one of the admissions/discharge nurses, and left the bedside duties to those who'd no longer have a choice but to use the translator phone. I'm just saying...

  • Apr 11

    You should also write a couple of thank you notes.

    1. Write one to post on the bulletin board so that everyone can see it and feel included
    2. Write a personal one to your preceptor
    3. Write a professional sounding note to your preceptor's boss for her personnel file. That's the way to help her professionally. Make sure her boss knows what a great job she did -- and put it in writing so that it will be in her file when it is time for her annual performance evaluation. It might also help her to get a promotion or some other "perk" that she may want in the future.


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