Latest Likes For OCNRN63

Latest Likes For OCNRN63

OCNRN63, RN Pro 32,077 Views

Joined Aug 27, '10. Posts: 7,085 (75% Liked) Likes: 27,111

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  • 9:03 pm

    As a former certified psych. nurse, I have to be honest: your conduct was inappropriate and not only escalated the patient's agitated behavior, but made things more difficult for anyone who would have had to evaluate him later, e.g. physician, social worker, crisis intervention worker, etc. Not only that, but you angered his mother, who could have been an ally.

    People who are suicidal don't behave in textbook manners; they present in many forms. And just because he didn't take an OD this time doesn't mean he won't OD to get that girl's attention the next time...or the next. It sounds like this kid is very impulsive and most likely has a personality disorder. The last thing people like that need is someone hectoring them over all their shortcomings.

    This was definitely not a therapeutic interaction. Perhaps you should do some research on how to handle suicidal patients in the ED. When you learn better, you do better.

  • 8:19 pm

    As a former certified psych. nurse, I have to be honest: your conduct was inappropriate and not only escalated the patient's agitated behavior, but made things more difficult for anyone who would have had to evaluate him later, e.g. physician, social worker, crisis intervention worker, etc. Not only that, but you angered his mother, who could have been an ally.

    People who are suicidal don't behave in textbook manners; they present in many forms. And just because he didn't take an OD this time doesn't mean he won't OD to get that girl's attention the next time...or the next. It sounds like this kid is very impulsive and most likely has a personality disorder. The last thing people like that need is someone hectoring them over all their shortcomings.

    This was definitely not a therapeutic interaction. Perhaps you should do some research on how to handle suicidal patients in the ED. When you learn better, you do better.

  • 6:25 pm

    As a former certified psych. nurse, I have to be honest: your conduct was inappropriate and not only escalated the patient's agitated behavior, but made things more difficult for anyone who would have had to evaluate him later, e.g. physician, social worker, crisis intervention worker, etc. Not only that, but you angered his mother, who could have been an ally.

    People who are suicidal don't behave in textbook manners; they present in many forms. And just because he didn't take an OD this time doesn't mean he won't OD to get that girl's attention the next time...or the next. It sounds like this kid is very impulsive and most likely has a personality disorder. The last thing people like that need is someone hectoring them over all their shortcomings.

    This was definitely not a therapeutic interaction. Perhaps you should do some research on how to handle suicidal patients in the ED. When you learn better, you do better.

  • May 29

    You can't work as an LPN/LVN if you are an RN. It doesn't matter if your RN license is in NY; if you go back to CA to work as a nurse, you will need to let the BON know that you have a license in another state and that it is a different one from the one you currently hold.

  • May 26

    Quote from stash11
    Thank you so much for your candid advice to the OP, some were really harsh (unnecessarily so) even though they were telling the OP the truth, so thank you for your kind and wise words. :-)
    I disagree. Some people really need the equivalent of a verbal dope-slap, because being nice and polite just won't get through to them.

    Anybody who says he is too impatient to do the bare minimum of clinical to get into a CRNA program demonstrates a terrifying lack of maturity. I'm not even sure he should be turned loose on an ICU, let alone be responsible for safely administering anesthesia.

  • May 25

    Quote from NeoNatMom
    I respect your opinions. I've made my decision. I do take the bible literally. However, I apply it in a WWJD sense now. Being a nurse is a calling for me.

    God Bless!
    You take the Bible literally? All of it? Seriously?

  • May 24

    My first job (30y ago) was in psych. I was certain I would never work in anything but psych. After about 4 years I could see the writing on the wall for our unit; decreasing admissions, staff taking low census days. I decided to make a change before it was forced upon me. I took a job in peds. That job was a springboard for many interesting jobs I never would have had if I'd dug in my heels and refused to do anything but psych.

    I understand not wanting to float, so you'll have to do what works for you. I do think you would be well within your rights to at least ask for longer orientation. Three or four days isn't enough. If you are definitely going to float, see if you can take an ACLS class. That might take some of the anxiety out of floating to tele. ACLS classes these days are very laid back; nothing like years ago when they terrorized you.

  • May 22

    Quote from Bea40448
    Thanks everyone. A lot of you have mentioned things that are extremely helpful and also have raised further questions in my mind. I will graduate with roughly 20k in student loan debts and since I will be living at home with my mother, it is my hope that at some point I can funnel a great majority of my earnings into paying off my student loans as fast as possible because I much prefer to live a debt free life. However, I'm confused as to how to approach my finances, should I focus on establishing a 6-8 months emergency plan first AND THEN focus on paying off student loans asap, AND THEN focus on the 401k since I am so young?? What order would you suggest considering I have no outstanding expenses, no other debt, and will basically continue the poor college student lifestyle even after I graduate.
    What I would do is work on the emergency fund and pay off the student loans. I like to watch Suze Ormon; she suggests at least 8 months for emergency funds.

    I actually had two savings accounts. One was emergency funds, and it was considered "untouchable." It was only for emergencies like major auto repair, health issues, etc. The other savings account was just for minor stuff, purchases I wanted to make, etc. Then I had the 403b which my employer matched.

    Bear in mind that savings accounts earn next to nothing in interest, so only save what you need for emergencies. The sooner you can pay off your student loan, the less money they make off you in interest.

    Do allow yourself some money to enjoy going out with friends/take a vaca., etc. You worked hard to get to this point; you should deserve to enjoy the fruits of your labor.

  • May 19

    Quote from jadelpn
    Additionally, when one has conversation at the nurses station, that can be overheard by others, you can more than likely expect a lot of input from said others.

    A reasonable expectation is to not have conversations of a personal nature at the nurses station, especially when the attending is sitting there attempting to work, and one is going on and on about time off/holidays, etc. Most find that distracting. Depending on the personality of the MD, you could have ended up with "ok, then, I have never had a holiday off. Are you going to take off my orders now, or shall we discuss your holiday some more?'

    A reasonable expectation is for people not to interject their opinions in what is obviously a personal conversation, no matter where it takes place. Have manners gone the way of the mastodon?

  • May 18

    Quote from moretonel
    Roser13, I accept I could be wrong, I'm still new to healthcare as a career. Please , enlighten me where I may need to rethink my position.
    Passing NCLEX means that a nurse has shown that s/he has the minimum level of competence to practice as a nurse. Nurses are licensed by their respective state BON and answer to them. Nursing education is highly regulated.

    An MA's education does not have the same rigor. MAs are not licensed, except in certain states, and even then that licensure does not carry the same weight as a nurse's license. Nurses are held accountable for their actions under their license; an MA, even one with a license, works under the auspices of his/her supervising physician.

    Someone may be able to know which squiggly lines require what medications, but that's a far cry from understanding the whats, the whys, and the wherefores of said treatment. Someone can't begin to understand how much you don't know until s/he actually goes to nursing school and starts learning about body systems, disease processes, and how they're managed.

    It's more likely that you're seeing lesser qualified individuals in supervisory positions because someone wants to save a buck or two.

  • May 18

    Quote from moretonel
    Roser13, I accept I could be wrong, I'm still new to healthcare as a career. Please , enlighten me where I may need to rethink my position.
    Passing NCLEX means that a nurse has shown that s/he has the minimum level of competence to practice as a nurse. Nurses are licensed by their respective state BON and answer to them. Nursing education is highly regulated.

    An MA's education does not have the same rigor. MAs are not licensed, except in certain states, and even then that licensure does not carry the same weight as a nurse's license. Nurses are held accountable for their actions under their license; an MA, even one with a license, works under the auspices of his/her supervising physician.

    Someone may be able to know which squiggly lines require what medications, but that's a far cry from understanding the whats, the whys, and the wherefores of said treatment. Someone can't begin to understand how much you don't know until s/he actually goes to nursing school and starts learning about body systems, disease processes, and how they're managed.

    It's more likely that you're seeing lesser qualified individuals in supervisory positions because someone wants to save a buck or two.

  • May 17

    Quote from Ambreree
    That's a nice way to look at it but I just felt that nurses couldn't really stick up for themselves on that site so the pre-meds could say whatever.

    You know, I have been a member of that site for nearly 15 years. I've gotten to know some really nice people on that site.

    I think you get out of that site what you put into it. I've had people there thank my for presenting the nurse's POV, or helping them to understand why nurses respond to situations the way they do.

    It's funny, there are people I remember as med students who are now attendings, and we chat on FB.

  • May 17

    Quote from moretonel
    Roser13, I accept I could be wrong, I'm still new to healthcare as a career. Please , enlighten me where I may need to rethink my position.
    Passing NCLEX means that a nurse has shown that s/he has the minimum level of competence to practice as a nurse. Nurses are licensed by their respective state BON and answer to them. Nursing education is highly regulated.

    An MA's education does not have the same rigor. MAs are not licensed, except in certain states, and even then that licensure does not carry the same weight as a nurse's license. Nurses are held accountable for their actions under their license; an MA, even one with a license, works under the auspices of his/her supervising physician.

    Someone may be able to know which squiggly lines require what medications, but that's a far cry from understanding the whats, the whys, and the wherefores of said treatment. Someone can't begin to understand how much you don't know until s/he actually goes to nursing school and starts learning about body systems, disease processes, and how they're managed.

    It's more likely that you're seeing lesser qualified individuals in supervisory positions because someone wants to save a buck or two.

  • May 17

    Quote from moretonel
    Roser13, I accept I could be wrong, I'm still new to healthcare as a career. Please , enlighten me where I may need to rethink my position.
    Passing NCLEX means that a nurse has shown that s/he has the minimum level of competence to practice as a nurse. Nurses are licensed by their respective state BON and answer to them. Nursing education is highly regulated.

    An MA's education does not have the same rigor. MAs are not licensed, except in certain states, and even then that licensure does not carry the same weight as a nurse's license. Nurses are held accountable for their actions under their license; an MA, even one with a license, works under the auspices of his/her supervising physician.

    Someone may be able to know which squiggly lines require what medications, but that's a far cry from understanding the whats, the whys, and the wherefores of said treatment. Someone can't begin to understand how much you don't know until s/he actually goes to nursing school and starts learning about body systems, disease processes, and how they're managed.

    It's more likely that you're seeing lesser qualified individuals in supervisory positions because someone wants to save a buck or two.

  • May 17

    Quote from moretonel
    Roser13, I accept I could be wrong, I'm still new to healthcare as a career. Please , enlighten me where I may need to rethink my position.
    Passing NCLEX means that a nurse has shown that s/he has the minimum level of competence to practice as a nurse. Nurses are licensed by their respective state BON and answer to them. Nursing education is highly regulated.

    An MA's education does not have the same rigor. MAs are not licensed, except in certain states, and even then that licensure does not carry the same weight as a nurse's license. Nurses are held accountable for their actions under their license; an MA, even one with a license, works under the auspices of his/her supervising physician.

    Someone may be able to know which squiggly lines require what medications, but that's a far cry from understanding the whats, the whys, and the wherefores of said treatment. Someone can't begin to understand how much you don't know until s/he actually goes to nursing school and starts learning about body systems, disease processes, and how they're managed.

    It's more likely that you're seeing lesser qualified individuals in supervisory positions because someone wants to save a buck or two.


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