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OCNRN63, RN Pro 33,997 Views

Joined Aug 27, '10. Posts: 7,102 (75% Liked) Likes: 27,235

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  • Jul 25

    Quote from romeorn4u
    Unfortunately,this is an issue that has always been present,and sadly enough is still happening alot,not only within our nursing profession,but with the patients as well.It is a situation that we can no longer continue to deny it,or continue tolerating it anymore,and that is why we all have to be united,so we can help to stop many of these bully,and arrogant doctors from abusing,and disrespecting our nursing profession. This kind of abuse,and injustice has to be stopped,and these doctors should be required to take mandatory anger management classes,including psychological therapy,among other things.And if they aren't fit to be doctors,then they should simply resign,go work in another profession,or somewhere else,and not continue abusing,and degrading other people,just because of their medical title,and status. Our beautiful,and blessed nursing profession,is not like a horse stable,where people can trample our rights,and degrade our profession,whenever they feel like doing so.It's really a shame,and pathetic,to see many ignorant nurses out there,not having the courage,or conscience to come forward,and report all these abuses. We simply can't allow this kind of negative behavior,to continue happening in our profession,period!
    Just because some of us have not had the same experience as the OP does not mean we are lacking in courage or conscience, nor are we ignorant.

    You've been a member here for over a year and a half. If you're so passionate on this topic, it seems strange that you chose this thread for your first post.

  • Jul 25

    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    We took the word "epidemic" for title of this thread from the first paragraph of linked article. It was neither our intention nor design to inflame, incite, insult or otherwise cause injury. Certainly did not expect to be attacked for doing so.

    Since a majority of the responding posters appear not to have encountered negative behavior from a physician nor likewise witnessed it against other nurses, decided to see what else was out there independent of the Slate article and the book from which it was drawn.

    Workplace bullying of general surgery residents by nurses. - PubMed - NCBI

    In the interests of full disclosure the above link was provided by: Bully doctor "epidemic" | Student Doctor Network
    which was happily provided by a physician friend.

    I'm confused. The PubMed article you cited was regarding residents being bullied by nurses, not nurses being bullied by the residents.

    Are you talking about bullying in general now, or are you still talking about nurses being bullied> If it's the latter, the the PubMed citation doesn't belong as a citation.

    No one is attacking you. You're just getting responses that don't agree with your premise.

    And who is "we"? Did you collaborate with someone in writing this article?

    Finally, I have been bullied by a few doctors...not many, but occasionally. I spoke up for myself, and on one occasion, I filled out an incident report. The doctor was spoken to by administration, and he behaved himself for a little while.

  • Jul 25

    If you couldn't afford to pay your bills, how could you afford a car plus credit cards? See, as a taxpayer, that cost me, and everyone else here. I can understand it must have been frustrating if someone racked up bills in your name that you couldn't pay, but it penalizes everyone else while you get to walk away.

    Edited to remove "new" car.

  • Jul 24

    Quote from Shelby, BSN, RN
    I want to make it clear that I LOVE my job. I'm concerned that saying anything will jeopardize my job in some way. Other people have witnessed this, but I never kept a journal. I really didn't think it would last this long. I have no desire to get a lawyer.
    I have tried avoiding him and I walk away after he says or does something. Yesterday I walked away after he made a comment and he followed me and said "you don't need to be embarrassed around me and you don't have to walk away."
    There's no way I can't be under his supervision. He is the boss of all the nurses in the entire hospital (he's the boss of my boss (the nurse manager)). He isn't with me all day, but he sees me many times each day on the weekend days that I work.
    I guess I need to be more firm and actually say this is making me uncomfortable. I have preferred the more passive and avoidant approach because I wanted to avoid repercussions from him. I believe he could have me fired if he wanted to.

    Which do you love more: your job or your life?

  • Jul 24

    If she is disclosing patient information when she shouldn't, I would let the DON know that. You might get more traction if you say "HIPAA violation." No facility wants to have to pay the fine for that.

    Do you have a Corporate Compliance line? That may be another option.

  • Jul 23

    Wait...you honestly thought of saying there were enough cute young nurse's aides for him to ogle? Even if you meant it in a joking manner, that would have been totally inappropriate; thank goodness you didn't say it.

    You need to shut this down right away. The next time you have to take care of him, if he makes another inappropriate remark tell him in no uncertain terms that you do not appreciate it and he needs to stop it immediately. I would let my supervisor know as well, because it's highly likely that he is being lewd toward your younger colleagues.

    Some of this has to do with power. Your patient is in a situation where he can't function independently. Being sexually provocative gives him a feeling of power, because most likely he can sense your discomfort. You have to take that power back by letting him know that sort of behavior will not be tolerated. He's not a demented 90 year old man; he is plenty young enough to straighten up. If he continues to make sexual remarks or his behavior escalates, you may need to suggest a psych. consult to his doc.

    And maybe you should check to make sure your scrub top isn't too revealing; if you bend over in front of a mirror and can see "the girls" then you need to wear a t-shirt under your top or get new scrub tops.

  • Jul 22

    I think you'd be better off staying put for a host of reasons, the main one being that you may not be able to get a peds job straight out of nursing school. Your current job will help you gain confidence working with sick adults; you can apply that knowledge and skill to other areas, including peds.

  • Jul 22

    Quote from Shelby, BSN, RN
    I want to make it clear that I LOVE my job. I'm concerned that saying anything will jeopardize my job in some way. Other people have witnessed this, but I never kept a journal. I really didn't think it would last this long. I have no desire to get a lawyer.
    I have tried avoiding him and I walk away after he says or does something. Yesterday I walked away after he made a comment and he followed me and said "you don't need to be embarrassed around me and you don't have to walk away."
    There's no way I can't be under his supervision. He is the boss of all the nurses in the entire hospital (he's the boss of my boss (the nurse manager)). He isn't with me all day, but he sees me many times each day on the weekend days that I work.
    I guess I need to be more firm and actually say this is making me uncomfortable. I have preferred the more passive and avoidant approach because I wanted to avoid repercussions from him. I believe he could have me fired if he wanted to.

    Which do you love more: your job or your life?

  • Jul 21

    Quote from romeorn4u
    Unfortunately,this is an issue that has always been present,and sadly enough is still happening alot,not only within our nursing profession,but with the patients as well.It is a situation that we can no longer continue to deny it,or continue tolerating it anymore,and that is why we all have to be united,so we can help to stop many of these bully,and arrogant doctors from abusing,and disrespecting our nursing profession. This kind of abuse,and injustice has to be stopped,and these doctors should be required to take mandatory anger management classes,including psychological therapy,among other things.And if they aren't fit to be doctors,then they should simply resign,go work in another profession,or somewhere else,and not continue abusing,and degrading other people,just because of their medical title,and status. Our beautiful,and blessed nursing profession,is not like a horse stable,where people can trample our rights,and degrade our profession,whenever they feel like doing so.It's really a shame,and pathetic,to see many ignorant nurses out there,not having the courage,or conscience to come forward,and report all these abuses. We simply can't allow this kind of negative behavior,to continue happening in our profession,period!
    Just because some of us have not had the same experience as the OP does not mean we are lacking in courage or conscience, nor are we ignorant.

    You've been a member here for over a year and a half. If you're so passionate on this topic, it seems strange that you chose this thread for your first post.

  • Jul 20

    Quote from dap1848
    People who wait tables may go 12 hours without a break. I've done it many times. It was just too complicated to find someone to watch my tables, get all undressed to use the restroom, and get all back together the way I needed to be in a short enough amount of time. There were many days I work 8-12 hours without a full dinner/lunch break when we were busy.
    Whenever I eat out, I always make a habit of giving the waitress/waiter a good tip. They work hard, get paid cr@p most of the time and deal with a lot of miserable people. Even if the service isn't that good, I leave a decent tip. Unless it's a habit for the waitstaff at a restaurant to be nasty, I chalk it up to someone having a bad day. Maybe the waitress just got chewed by her mgr., then had to handle a table full of obnoxious, demanding customers. And it's been 10 hours since she peed and she had no lunch.

  • Jul 20

    Quote from lamehok
    I agree that there is definitely something special about older nurses. They were dedicated, concientious and very professional. The world of nursing loses good ones every day.
    I am personally a hybrid. ( I will be 50 this year). I definitely remember the old but I embrace the newer technologies and skills. I was blessed to receive a package in the mail, the other day. It was from my mentor, that is one of those "older nurses." She recently retired and sent me her stethoscope, calipers, scissors, nursing pin, etc. I actually treasure those items even more than my newly obtained BSN diploma. I would not be who I am today without Cyndy's encouragement and example of what a nurse should be.
    What a thoughtful gift! She must have seen a lot of promise in you to go so far as to give you her nursing pin.

  • Jul 19

    My first job was in psych.; that was thirty years ago. I was caring for a patient in seclusion. She repeatedly asked me to tell the doctor she needed a particular med for a chronic condition she had; due to her psych meds, it was imperative she get that med. I asked the doctor over the course of several days to please prescribe the med, to no avail. One night as I came back from dinner, the patient went into distress.

    I repeatedly paged the psych. on call, who did not answer my pages. I tried paging the intern and residents on call to get the patient transferred off our unit as she was clearly unstable and no longer appropriate to be on psych. After several hours, we finally got her transferred.

    Later that night during a procedure, she coded and died. I was devastated. At one point while I was trying to get her transferred, she grabbed my hand and said, "Please don't let me die."

    I was later told by risk mgmt. that the way I documented painted a clear picture of how hard I tried to get medical intervention for the patient, and that the fault for her death was on the doctors' shoulders.

    Her death was unnecessary. If she'd gotten the medication she needed, she probably would have walked out of the hospital, instead of going out in a hearse.

  • Jul 19

    Other than using some of the above, as well as using the ventrogluteal site as often as possible, I have no other suggestions.

    The technique you describe sounds rife opportunities for infection.

  • Jul 19

    Quote from icuRNmaggie
    This topic is something I never thought about much before and this discussion has been thought provoking .

    I am a white woman of Irish descent. I was trying to imagine how I would feel if I had to do some kind of chemical process to my hair just to be offered a job and it really angered me.

    It angers me that anyone would expect people of other racial and ethnic groups to conform to some kind of generic conservative hair style to obtain work as a nurse. In 2015!
    Agreed.

    I am bald from chemotherapy. If I were able to work, should I be required to wear an itchy wig that doesn't suit me, when I have so many cute hats that compliment my face and look much better than my wig?

  • Jul 18

    Sorry...I'm still trying not to yak over the ranch dressing in the breast milk container.


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