Content That JustBeachyNurse Likes

Content That JustBeachyNurse Likes

JustBeachyNurse 60,333 Views

Joined Aug 5, '10. Posts: 35,546 (21% Liked) Likes: 21,779

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  • Aug 28

    Quote from user387
    Ok, you want an example of a female medic?
    Here's one: in the military some soldiers are given medical training, some of these soldiers are female, these are female medics!
    Medics in the military have completed required and rigorous training and have earned the title of medic, regardless of gender. In the military I assure you that both male and females share the same military occupational specialty (MOS) code.

    I am a female, I am a nurse, and I am a paramedic. I was also in the military and I am married to a former Army combat medic. No one should call themselves "medic" unless they are one. Period.

    Gravedig! Lol. Love it.

  • Aug 28

    Drugs in various modes of delivery are pulled from the market for many reasons, so this is probably one of those situations. If they are just figuring out the proper dosage now, it could be that the old SL tablets didn't work quite as well as the injectables, which have their own issues with vasoconstriction at the site delaying absorption (but the SL tabs do the same thing, apparently).

  • Aug 28

    Quote from TinyNurse2be
    Sounds like a lot of work.
    Sounds like shenanigans to me...there's been a pattern of recent threads started that seem simply too dramatic and far-fetched to be true.

  • Aug 28

    Well Dang. Now I see where I went wrong - when it's too late to take corrective action.

  • Aug 28

    We can not help you with this as this is an anonymous board. If you wish to reconnect with your providers, it would be best to obtain your medical records.

  • Aug 28

    Either that or he wanted to have some fun: brand-new member registered today posting a controversial opinion. Any bridges near here?

  • Aug 28

    Quote from user387
    I agree that 'male nurses' should be refered to as 'medics'.
    The word 'nurse' is a gender-specific term, it's a feminine word, like 'actress'.
    To say 'male nurse' is like saying 'male actress' - the two words don't go together.
    We talk about a mother nursing her newborn. The word nursing is always (or mostly) associated with the feminine. It's a female word!

    'Male nurses' could be called hospital medics, or just 'medics' for brevity.
    The word 'medic' is a generic unisex word - it can be applied to many kinds of people with medical training whether military or civilian eg: paramedic (civilian), field medic (military) etc.
    Now I do understand that the military use the word 'medic' when refering to a soldier with medical training BUT we are not talking about a military setting we are talking about a CIVILIAN hospital, therefore considerations about rank do not come into it because it's a civilian setting.

    'Doctor', on the other hand, is also a unisex word - it can refer to both sexes.
    There are gender-specific words and there are unisex words!

    It's not about sexism or discrimination, it's about respecting and appreciating the distinctions between the masculine and the feminine and not blurring the lines between them to satisfy political correctness. When refering to a man a masculine term needs to be used and likewise when refering to a woman a feminine term needs to be used - this is true in ALL professions and walks of life.
    I dare you to call an EMT a "medic" in front of a Paramedic. In some places you might get away with it and in most you won't. A medic or Paramedic in the civilian world has considerably more training than an EMT.

    Hospital medics in the civilian world are not nurses either. Ever hear of professional titles? These are the titles established by the professional board which gives you your license and scope of practice.

    Medic and nurse are two very different education, career paths and licensing boards.

    Your insecurity is obvious. Maybe you should stick to the EMS discussion page where this topic is running its course. If you have chosen not to go to nursing school because you don't want to be called a nurse, the profession is better off with you not in it. I can only imagine what your opinion is of female medics.

  • Aug 28

    Quote from user387
    I agree that 'male nurses' should be refered to as 'medics'.
    The word 'nurse' is a gender-specific term, it's a feminine word, like 'actress'.
    To say 'male nurse' is like saying 'male actress' - the two words don't go together.
    We talk about a mother nursing her newborn. The word nursing is always (or mostly) associated with the feminine. It's a female word!

    'Male nurses' could be called hospital medics, or just 'medics' for brevity.
    The word 'medic' is a generic unisex word - it can be applied to many kinds of people with medical training whether military or civilian eg: paramedic (civilian), field medic (military) etc.
    Now I do understand that the military use the word 'medic' when refering to a soldier with medical training BUT we are not talking about a military setting we are talking about a CIVILIAN hospital, therefore considerations about rank do not come into it because it's a civilian setting.

    'Doctor', on the other hand, is also a unisex word - it can refer to both sexes.
    There are gender-specific words and there are unisex words!

    It's not about sexism or discrimination, it's about respecting and appreciating the distinctions between the masculine and the feminine and not blurring the lines between them to satisfy political correctness. When refering to a man a masculine term needs to be used and likewise when refering to a woman a feminine term needs to be used - this is true in ALL professions and walks of life.
    No, it isn't. The English language does not have gendered nouns, unlike French or English. Neither is "nurse" gendered in it's definition, like "female" or "mother".

    That the name of a profession practiced largely - but not exclusively - by women would be considered demeaning to men has more to do with the more toxic aspects of male socialization than anything else. Guys who are vulnerable to that assumption (IOW scared someone will call them a girl) might want to think about challenging it, if only for the sake of their own mental health.

  • Aug 28

    Even the term "male nurse" is silly. As a male I'm embarrassed to be called a male nurse, a murse, or any of that crap. For those men who see being called a nurse as a negative issue, perhaps you're not tough enough for the job.

  • Aug 28

    Regardless of one's gender or gender identification, any attempt to change the title of Nurse to something else is beyond ridiculous. If you want to be a nurse then be one, if you can't handle being called a nurse then do something else. I've been a nurse for 20 years, I'm a man, I'm proud to be called a nurse!

  • Aug 27

    Quote from Saiderap
    UNDER USED? REALLY?
    Perhaps it was 10 years ago when the article you cite was written.

  • Aug 27

    Yawn is, essentially, a very deep breath. So, yeah, it increases oxygen saturation for a few seconds.

    What is described by OP is named "too warm a finger". Barring subtle deterioration, the most probable reason was overheat and local decrease affinity of Hb to O2 and the right shift of the curve of Hb/O2 dissociation. Patients with underlying acidosis, especially chronic and compensated, are prone to this.

    I see decrease of saturation with hands still warm all the time in LTACH. In fact, it is one of my favorite hallmarks of "subtle deterioration" first signs. SpO2 measures % of Hb molecules fully (at all 4 points) "saturated" with O2, or those which bind 4 O2 and so have all 4 active centers occupied. All sensors are calibrated for Hb total content of around 10 mg/dl. Therefore, decrease in SpO2 can mean, most commonly:
    - not enough O2
    - not enough Hb
    - something which doesn't let oxygen and hemoglobin to connect (metabolic acidosis, fever, etc - google "hemoglobin dissociation curve") - very common with warm hands, fever, starting sepsis, etc).

  • Aug 27

    Quote from malamud69
    All human beings are different...TREND all vitals...
    SpO2 is never an absolute number - you need SAO2 for that. Always watch the trend with SpO2.

    The purpose of a yawn is to decrease CO2. Of course, it also increases oxygenation briefly. If the deep breath also moves any mucus that was blocking an airway, then oxygenation can stay up.

    The pulse ox probe will warm the finger, especially the wrap-around kind. That's why you rotate the site when you leave a probe on; it can burn the finger, given time,

  • Aug 27

    Wouldn't someone be looking into what necessitated a trip to OR for a resident? Is no one auditing MARS and charts and seeing that she is holding insulin when it's not warranted?

    Quote from Springdaisy
    I am a registered nurse and I work in a LTC facility. I have some practices to me that are not safe. For example, there is one instance I member that involved levemir, long acting insulin. I was always taught that you never hold long acting insulin even if the blood sugar is low. As long as the patient is eating and has their snack, it is ok to give it. This one in particular kept holding the levemir and writing that she held it because the sugar was very low at 90. According to this nurse if the blood sugar falls below 100 it should be held. She was holding it consistently causing the resident's sugar to be high on the morning. Some mornings it would be 200, 300 and one morning it went up to 700. The patient ended up having to go to the hospital in the ICU. I spoke to nurse about this before but she refused to listen. She taught she knew better than everybody else. She try argue with everybody because she had to be right all the time. This time she endangered a patient's life. I did not report her because I wanted to give her the benefit of the doubt. How else could I have handled that differently? Any input would be much appreciated.

  • Aug 27

    Your first obligation is to the patient! I try to handle situations like this directly by providing the nurse with evidence indicating their shortcomings. I actually will print out policies and articles and standard of care statements.If I do not see that they are open to learning and then a change in how they practice then I will go straight to management.I can't seem to live with myself if I do not take action for those that entrust us with their well being.This is not a situation to give someone the benefit of the doubt since there is no other way to interpret her actions other than lack of knowledge and critical thinking!


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