Content That JustBeachyNurse Likes

JustBeachyNurse 85,101 Views

Joined Aug 5, '10. Posts: 37,143 (21% Liked) Likes: 22,634

Sorted By Last Like Given (Max 500)
  • Oct 14

    That seems terribly uncomfortable. The only time we do nt suctioning is on semi conscious patients and we to use a trumpet in that case. Even then, we're not going as deep as you describe. In what country do you practice?

  • Oct 14

    I would need to know why you NT suctioning an alert patient? It is horribly uncomfortable and painful for that patient. I've only ever seen it done on an alert patient one time and it was a very last resort and it was left up to the RT. I was not attempting it.

  • Oct 14

    I can't believe OPs concern here is focused on not having friends after this, instead of the very real possibility of getting kicked out AND assisting in getting her friend kicked out. Unreal. Immature. Moving along....

  • Oct 14

    I'll add to all the advise.... when you are all cheating your way through nursing school it behooves you to not post about it on a site. One of your classmates might realize who you are on here and turn you in.

  • Oct 14

    From the title "Worst Day Ever" and the opening sentence, "I had the worst day ever in the history of worst days!" I was expecting something along the lines of, "I made a med error and my patient coded," or "I just watched a newborn die in the arms of his weeping mother," or, "I was accused of diverting narcotics and have now lost my job and livelihood," not "I betrayed my friend's trust and it caused a lot of drama."

    Color me jaded, but I'm a little underwhelmed.

    Apologize, try to mend bridges, learn from the situation, and move forward.

  • Oct 14

    Basically, the OP found what was believed to be a cheat sheet (or midterm examination topics) for the midterms on her friends phone, and sent it to a group of people without her friend's permission. If this gets out, the friend may possibly be kicked out of the program on grounds of academic dishonesty because (1), the file was linked to the friend's phone, and (2), what was the friend doing with the file in the first place?

    To the OP, no, you can't fix this. You violated your friend's privacy, you showed that you cannot be trusted around other people's belongings, and you overstepped some serious personal boundaries. Who needs friends like that? That's what enemies are for.

    I think that if she is dismissed from the program, the person who sent the file out to the group, (you), should be as well.

  • Oct 14

    I read this three times and I still feel thoroughly confused about what actually happened.

  • Oct 14

    Quote from FolksBtrippin
    HIPPA applies to non-nurses.
    No it doesn't. It only applies to covered entities, and individuals employed by them.


    HIPAA is also very restrictive - not every piece of information about a patient or every situation is covered by HIPAA.

    If you're going to make bold statements, at least get the acronym right.

  • Oct 13

    Let your instructor know that this particular nurse did not like to be shadowed and wanted you to attend to a task instead. Next time you go on the unit, spend your time with the patient, not with the nurse. If you are allowed, give the patient a bed bath, ambulate the patient down the hallway, practice your head to toe assessment. If the patient is on a regular diet and without fluid restrictions (hint: listen in report to find out) ask the nurse if it is okay to get water, crackers, coffee etc for your patient and then do it.

    If your patient gets sick of you, answer call lights. There usually will not be a lot you can do, but you can find the person who can do it and do it with their permission (or watch), and you can always practice your therapeutic communication. Learn where the blankets, pillows, towels, etc are so you can fetch them when they are needed.

    If a patient has to go to x ray, cat scan, interventional radiology, ultrasound, etc. Ask to go. These are good learning opportunities for you. Observe. Write down any questions that come up and ask your instructor in post conference. Avoid asking staff unless they encourage you to ask questions. It can be very hard for them to teach while they are giving care. You will find a few who can, and that is great. If someone can't do that don't get upset.

    Don't feel sad or demoralized by a nurse who seems cold to you. Often nurses are overwhelmed with their own work, behind on things, and students slow them down. Stay out of the nurse's way if that happens. If the nurse goes into your patient's room though, make sure you are in there! You can watch all kinds of stuff that way.

  • Oct 13

    As a floor nurse I have no problem with a student following me and shadowing. Most instructors at least give me the courtesy of asking if I am okay with taking on a student and my response is usually, "Sure, if they can keep up", literally. I am not going to slow down my pace in order for a student to chase me, so it's up to them if they want to run around for their clinical day.

    We don't get any additional pay for the responsibility of a student. We still get the same number of patients that we would have if we were working independently. We are usually short staffed and while we understand you are learning and want a good clinical experience, it is your school's responsibility to provide that quality education to you, not ours. It IS our responsibility to assess all of our patients, pass our meds on time, handle admissions/discharges/ and the oh-so-poorly-timed rapid response all at once, and all of the various tasks in between (q1 hr pain meds, blown IVs, 20 stat orders including two foley catheter insertions, a million dressing changes, a darn wound vac that won't stop leaking and alarming, mostly isolation patients, and why oh why is it always that scabies patient that won't stay in bed setting off their bed alarm every five minutes?!).

    It's not that nurse's don't like students. It's just that the facility is not going to staff us appropriately so that we can do your instructor's job for them. Our shifts are 12 hours and if I'm already running behind, I sure as hell am not going to stay overtime because I went ahead and explained everything to a student step by step. My management wouldn't accept that as a reason for running into OT either.

  • Oct 13

    You do realize you pay money to the school to teach you, and not to the bedside nurse, yes? It is also quite possible that the nurse who had the patient you were assigned to already had far too much on their plate- sadly, it seems instructors do not take other things into account when assigning students, such as nurses barely off orientation themselves who are still learning how to do the job. And honestly, students add a lot to an already overwhelming workload.

    How to deal with it: Utilize your instructor. That is who is paid to instruct. The nurse is getting nothing but additional work. Realize that nurses are humans just like the rest of us. Not all of them have great people skills and not all of them have what it takes to work with students.

    You had one day in clincials with one nurse. Don't let 1 experience color your perception of all nurses and how all of your clinical experiences are going to be.

  • Oct 12

    Welcome to allnurses!

    I would think that, if your daughter is old enough and responsible enough to be an LVN, she is capable of figuring out and completing her own application forms.

  • Oct 12

    Quote from FolksBtrippin
    HIPPA applies to non-nurses.
    HIPAA applies to what "covered entities" can do with PHI and one is not subject to it unless a covered entity, an employee performing a role on behalf of the covered entity, a business contracting with the covered entity, etc. The OP's role in this did not fall into any of those categories. HIPAA literally has nothing to do with what the OP is proposing.

    The bigger question, to me, is why be involved with others' mess? What information will the OP share that is not already part of the submitted facts of the case?

  • Oct 12

    Quote from FolksBtrippin
    HIPPA applies to non-nurses.
    The situation has nothing to do with her employment. HIPAA does not apply. If you read the original post, all she did was take someone to the ER. She NOW works there, but did not at the time of the incident. She is no more bound by HIPAA than is anyone who takes someone to the ER.

  • Oct 12

    Quote from bear94
    A close friend of mine is in a custody battle with his ex. She is extremely unstable and unfortunately suffers from a multitude of psychiatric issues. Recently, she kidnapped their child and the child was found in filthy conditions. She is safe now with her father.

    In June of 2016, before I was technically a nurse (I was taking NCLEX around this time), I brought the woman in subject to the emergency department I now work at (I was not an employee at the time). She was psychiatrically evaluated, and was admitted to a psychiatric facility for a week afterwards. After that event, she abandoned her child for months with hardly any contact with the father or child. The father (my friend) has asked me to provide a statement for court about the time I brought her to the emergency department to be evaluated.

    I want to help him, but I am nervous about this being a HIPAA violation since I am a nurse now.
    You absolutely should not offer this info willingly. Say no and add that if it is really that important, the judge can subpoena you. If the judge does subpoena you, contact the legal department of your employer for advice.

    On a similar note... never, ever, ever get involved in someone else's custody battle.


close