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JustBeachyNurse 73,074 Views

Joined Aug 5, '10. Posts: 36,136 (21% Liked) Likes: 22,292

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  • Feb 26

    That would be an acceptable incidental exposure. Now if the family member asked you directly and you answered different story.

  • Feb 24

    Many graduates of Filipino nursing schools have been rejected due to concurrency of clinical and theory for the past few years. There are other affected countries. The country of citizenship is not the issue but the country of education.

  • Feb 23

    PT = physical therapist
    pt. = Patient.

    discuss with your facility HIPAA compliance officer as this will be a he said she said situation.

  • Feb 23

    PT = physical therapist
    pt. = Patient.

    discuss with your facility HIPAA compliance officer as this will be a he said she said situation.

  • Feb 21

    Yes. Failure to do so can be considered withholding/failure to disclose and subsequent sanctions and/or denial of license. The application specifies exactly what must be disclosed to the BoN by law

  • Feb 20

    Yes. Failure to do so can be considered withholding/failure to disclose and subsequent sanctions and/or denial of license. The application specifies exactly what must be disclosed to the BoN by law

  • Feb 18

    Quote from RNBoss9
    Oh please if you can help me. I did complete the RN program and as you stated he will not release my transcript because of payment. What can I do??
    Try contacting the state board of nursing but if you owe money he's not wrong

  • Feb 18

    Quote from FloatyFlowers
    I'm not being paid by Medicaid now as I haven't graduated yet and am currently employed as their personal care attendant.

    I will have to look more into this as I was wondering myself. Thanks!
    Who pays you? Parents direct? Agency?

    If s/he is stable enough for just a personal care attendant s/he may not be complex enough to qualify for skilled nursing services unless there is a change in status. An RN would have to do an intake assessment to make that determination (whether agency or independent)

    PCAs aren't to be doing medication administration, assessments or tube feeding especially in pediatrics. Those are nursing skills with RN case managers.

    There are few complex pedi cases at the personal care/HHA level. Those that are are safety assist, fall prevention, monitor PO feeds, personal care (toileting, bathing, hygiene, ADLs, meal prep & assist, perhaps lift if limited mobility).

  • Feb 18

    New grads generally don't work as independent providers. If otherwise qualified they work for an agency that provides orientation and training as well as verification of training for Medicaid and other insurers. Online training should not suffice to demonstrate competency who is going to verify your skills and knowledge?

  • Feb 17

    TAANA Executive Office - Home the American association of nurse attorneys offers a lawyer referral service for nurse attorneys experienced in license defense. Consultations are rarely free but may be worthwhile

  • Feb 17

    Yes and it would likely violate your employers policies. Other family members might object. Just don't do it.

    Keep social media and work separate

  • Feb 17

    Ask the other nurses or the disability center that employs you.

    As I explained before private duty/home health agencies offer this training to their employees. Pediatric hospitals and long term care facilities offer this training to their employees. This is not something you can take an online class to demonstrate competency, that's impossible. New grads that take on this kind of work are not independent contractors but agency employees that go through orientation, lab, preceptorship and training through the nurse educator at the private duty/home health agency that hired them. I seriously doubt any agency as explained several times will allow you to do their training as a non-employee and accept responsibility to sign the form and declare you trained and competent.

  • Feb 17

    Quote from FloatyFlowers
    I'm not being paid by Medicaid now as I haven't graduated yet and am currently employed as their personal care attendant.

    I will have to look more into this as I was wondering myself. Thanks!
    Who pays you? Parents direct? Agency?

    If s/he is stable enough for just a personal care attendant s/he may not be complex enough to qualify for skilled nursing services unless there is a change in status. An RN would have to do an intake assessment to make that determination (whether agency or independent)

    PCAs aren't to be doing medication administration, assessments or tube feeding especially in pediatrics. Those are nursing skills with RN case managers.

    There are few complex pedi cases at the personal care/HHA level. Those that are are safety assist, fall prevention, monitor PO feeds, personal care (toileting, bathing, hygiene, ADLs, meal prep & assist, perhaps lift if limited mobility).

  • Feb 17

    Quote from FloatyFlowers
    Nope, LPNs are able to be independent providers here. For more info, you can check http://emedny.org.
    But your plan of care must be created by an RN and signed off by a physician. Are you being paid by Medicaid now as a home health aide/caregiver? If so, who is the RN signing off? While LPNs can bill NY Medicaid directly, this not a role for an inexperienced new grad. The role is intended for an experienced independent nurse qualified with verifiable skills and demonstrated competency

  • Feb 16

    Quote from Mavrick
    If by "contaminated" you mean no longer sterile then so be it. The contents of the stomach is not sterile, we don't ingest sterile food or drink (well maybe straight alcohol). A clean, cup with clean tap water is perfectly sufficient for routine flushes of an NG tube.
    Exactly what I mean. I was taught tap or standard bottled water was sufficient for routine flushes unless neonate, immune compromised or fresh post op then the physician may order a different flush whether sterile saline, sterile water but then these cases would not be considered routine. Why waste sterile water when not needed?


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