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JustBeachyNurse 76,078 Views

Joined Aug 5, '10. Posts: 36,563 (21% Liked) Likes: 22,414

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  • May 21

    Quote from SolsticeRN
    I didn't know it's not authorized to share because it was posted here in allnurses.com by the one who made it, in a pdf form, to be seen and copied by the struggling people like me to help pass the nclex.
    It was neverposted by the one who created it. It was posted by someone who decided they wanted to share it without confirming the source

  • May 21

    Teaching experiences & credentials often at the doctoral level. Must meet criteria as a subject matter expert (so if you work in pediatric clinic you would not be qualified to author a text about advanced trauma nursing) My sister is published for graduate and post graduate research and has a text chapter pending publication as part of her doctoral level education. Has APN, MSN, PhD(c), credentials in her specialty area, 15 years as an educator & clinical supervisor in a BSN program, credentied as a nurse educator, dept of education credentials to teach collegiate/university level, over 20 years experience all in her specialty area between staff/BSN, charge, supervisor/director, instructor, assistant professor and now professor). She even is qualified to write and review NCLEX questions for RN & LPN in her area of specialty.

    (Nope she shares NOTHING about the NCLEX and she's been a nurse longer than me. Damn ethics!)

    I must add it was a little weird when doing a research project for school and then citing your own sister's published research as a source.

  • May 20

    Teaching experiences & credentials often at the doctoral level. Must meet criteria as a subject matter expert (so if you work in pediatric clinic you would not be qualified to author a text about advanced trauma nursing) My sister is published for graduate and post graduate research and has a text chapter pending publication as part of her doctoral level education. Has APN, MSN, PhD(c), credentials in her specialty area, 15 years as an educator & clinical supervisor in a BSN program, credentied as a nurse educator, dept of education credentials to teach collegiate/university level, over 20 years experience all in her specialty area between staff/BSN, charge, supervisor/director, instructor, assistant professor and now professor). She even is qualified to write and review NCLEX questions for RN & LPN in her area of specialty.

    (Nope she shares NOTHING about the NCLEX and she's been a nurse longer than me. Damn ethics!)

    I must add it was a little weird when doing a research project for school and then citing your own sister's published research as a source.

  • May 20

    Your other thread offers more insight. This was an incident not a HIPAA violation.
    The nurse did NOT ask you to abandon your patient they asked you to reconsider your efficiency in focusing all of your attention on one patient while leaving the rest of your patients unattended and unmedicated. If your patient with alcohol withdrawal was so unstable they needed ongoing one to one nursing care they should have been transferred to a higher acuity unit. Leaving a stable patient's room to care for others with acute needs is not abandonment. Seeking misplaced documents from a supervisor you have a negative relationship with shows a possible low level of maturity and reduced professionalism. Once or twice is not a pattern. Even HHS (who enforces HIPAA) agrees.

  • May 20

    Your other thread offers more insight. This was an incident not a HIPAA violation.
    The nurse did NOT ask you to abandon your patient they asked you to reconsider your efficiency in focusing all of your attention on one patient while leaving the rest of your patients unattended and unmedicated. If your patient with alcohol withdrawal was so unstable they needed ongoing one to one nursing care they should have been transferred to a higher acuity unit. Leaving a stable patient's room to care for others with acute needs is not abandonment. Seeking misplaced documents from a supervisor you have a negative relationship with shows a possible low level of maturity and reduced professionalism. Once or twice is not a pattern. Even HHS (who enforces HIPAA) agrees.

  • May 20

    Quote from roser13
    I don't understand the connection between your post's title and the content.
    She has hit multiple forums but is attempting method 3 to challenge LVN licensing in CA as a CNA which requires specific experience in units from pediatrics, maternity, med/surg, psych doing specific skills over a total of 60 months. She's upset her employer/managers won't sign off on what cannot be verified as there is no record of the OP working the minimum time in each unit over 5 years as it's not tracked (extremely few attempt to challenge lvn licensing without attending school & graduating. However it's ironic that CA permits this but denies consideration to Excelsior graduates)

    HomeApplicantsMethod 3
    Method 3

    Qualification Based on Equivalent Education and/or Experience, section 2873 of the Vocational Nursing Practice Act and section 2516(b) of the California Code of Regulations

    Overview

    Qualifying for the licensure examination based on prior education and experience, often referred to as "the equivalency method", requires the applicant to provide documentation of a minimum of 51 months of paid general duty inpatient bedside nursing experience in a clinical facility and completion of a 54-theory-hour pharmacology course. If the applicant has successfully completed additional formal nursing education, that education may be substituted for some of the required bedside nursing experience.

    The equivalency method permits unlicensed individuals who have had extensive inpatient bedside nursing care experience, plus a limited amount of formal education, to demonstrate that they have acquired sufficient basic nursing knowledge to be eligible for the licensure examination.

    Please note that achieving licensure via the equivalency method may limit the licensee's ability to be hired as a licensed vocational nurse or psychiatric technician. No other state accepts licensees who have been licensed via this method. In addition to licensure, some health care facilities within California require that their potential employees be graduates of approved nursing or psychiatric technician programs. Such facilities will not hire licensees who have achieved licensure via the equivalency method. If you have questions about licensure in another state, please contact that state's board of nursing. If you have questions about the hiring practice of a particular health care facility in California, please contact that facility.

    Experience

    Pursuant to the California Code of Regulations section 2516(b), the 51 months of paid general duty inpatient bedside nursing experience must include a minimum of each of the following:

    48 months medical/surgical nursing;
    6 weeks maternity or genitourinary nursing;
    6 weeks pediatric nursing.
    The majority of the paid bedside nursing experience must have occurred in a inpatient clinical facility providing the types of patient care that will prepare the applicant for the content topics covered in the licensure examination. It is required that all experience must have occurred within the past ten years, with half of the required experience occurring in the past five years. The experience must have been recent enough that the applicant is knowledgeable regarding current types of patient care equipment, policies and procedures.

    When calculating work experience, the applicant can substitute up to a maximum of eight months of the required medical-surgical clinical experience with experience obtained outside of the acute care setting; however, a minimum of 40 months of medical-surgical experience must have occurred in an acute care facility. Paid work experience in the following areas will be applicable toward the eight months that can be substituted for acute medical-surgical experience:

    Communicable Disease Nursing
    Public Health Nursing
    Occupational Health Nursing
    Office Nursing (M.D.)
    Psychiatric Nursing
    Operating Room Nursing
    Private Duty Nursing (Performed in acute care facilities only)
    Emergency Room Nursing
    Out Patient Clinic
    Post Anesthesia Recovery Nursing
    Hemodialysis Nursing
    Rehabilitation Nursing
    Gerontological Nursing
    Emergency Medical Technician Service
    [Please note: The following types of work experience will not be accepted in this category; home health aide, in-home care provider, in-home hospice provider, board and care provider, residential care provider, unit secretary, ward clerk, transport aide, phlebotomist, monitor technician, field paramedic. This list is not all-inclusive, but is offered for clarification purposes.]

    In the application packet, an Employment Verification form is provided. The applicant must provide a copy of this form to all employers. On the verification form, all paid bedside nursing experience must be verified by the applicant's employer(s) indicating specific dates of employment and the number of hours worked in each area. The employment verification form must be mailed directly to the Board by the employer in an official business envelope.

    The verification of experience must also include certification from the Director or Supervisor (must be a registered nurse) that the applicant has satisfactorily demonstrated the following knowledge and skills:

    A. Basic Bedside Nursing

    Ambulation techniques
    Bedmaking
    Urinary Catheter care
    Collection of specimens
    Diabetic testing
    Administration of a cleansing enema
    Feeding patient
    Hot and cold applications
    Intake and Output
    Personal hygiene and comfort measures
    Positioning and transfer
    Range of motion
    Skin care
    Vital signs
    Communication skills, both verbal and written, including communication with patients who have psychological disorders
    B. Infection control procedures (may be demonstrated in classroom, lab, and/or patient care settings.)

    Asepsis
    Techniques for strict, contact, respiratory, enteric, tuberculosis, drainage, universal and immunosuppressed patient isolation.
    Method 3: Qualification Based on Equivalent Education and/or Experience - Board of Vocational Nursing & Psychiatric Technicians

    If your employer can't verify you are out of luck

  • May 20

    Your other thread offers more insight. This was an incident not a HIPAA violation.
    The nurse did NOT ask you to abandon your patient they asked you to reconsider your efficiency in focusing all of your attention on one patient while leaving the rest of your patients unattended and unmedicated. If your patient with alcohol withdrawal was so unstable they needed ongoing one to one nursing care they should have been transferred to a higher acuity unit. Leaving a stable patient's room to care for others with acute needs is not abandonment. Seeking misplaced documents from a supervisor you have a negative relationship with shows a possible low level of maturity and reduced professionalism. Once or twice is not a pattern. Even HHS (who enforces HIPAA) agrees.

  • May 17

    Quote from saskrn
    Wow, that's a substantial fine over CEU's.
    Mostly the fine is for lying on your renewal application as you certify that you have or will have completed the ceus by 5/31 of that year (you can renew from 4/15-5/31) so if you renew on 4/15 and say you will have 30 ceu by 5/31 and get audited expect $$$$ and a ding on your license for dishonesty plus have to do doe extra CEu and a class in professional etics

  • May 17

    BoN fine is $1000-5000 for not completing the 30-CEUs during biannual license renewal depending on how you respond to the BoN inquiry.

    The BoN issued fines & penalties in the hundreds to thousands plus mandatory training or education for violations of the nurse practice act. (Training/education/clinical at the expense of the licensee)

  • May 17

    Not a violation had her consent. You did not come across the information as an employee and did not disclose any PHI

  • May 16

    I think it's misunderstood and used as an excuse for everything and even outside healthcare. However I think incidents are under reported and under enforced even in rather egregious scenarios.

  • May 16

    NJ Board of Nursing depending on the complaint. If you are complaining about something like financial aid it would be a different agency , possibly federal.

  • May 16

    Not a violation had her consent. You did not come across the information as an employee and did not disclose any PHI

  • May 16

    Quote from AceOfHearts<3
    My first job drew one vial to have a baseline of my hep c status in case there were any issues later on. They didn't draw titers since I had records of my hep b ones from nursing school.

    My second job drew 1 vial for the quantiferon gold TB test and that was it.

    Both places tested my urine for drugs and nicotine.
    Really usually its hep B not hep C they test for

  • May 16

    What state? Generally graduation indicating successful program completion. Technically D is passing. In almost all cases graduation from a BoN approved school of nursing plus successful application for a nursing license by examination and an acceptable criminal background check are the criteria for permission to take the NCLEX. If you have defaulted on student loans or child support your application will be denied per federal laws. If your school will not permit you to graduate or issue a diploma with a D in English then you can't apply for a nursing license by examination


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