Latest Likes For JustBeachyNurse

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JustBeachyNurse 58,503 Views

Joined Aug 5, '10. Posts: 35,288 (21% Liked) Likes: 21,532

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  • Jul 29

    When I worked in the ER as a tech (I had my EMT B and our titles were "Multi-Skilled Technician" or "ER Tech"), there were also a few CNA's. When a patient would call out nurse when we walked by their cubicle, most of us would say "I'm not a nurse, I'm a tech, how can I help you?" Most of the time it was a blanket or a pillow, but pretty much anything else most of us knew to check with the nurse (whether a pt was NPO or could have water, question about tests or medications, etc were all deferred to the nurse as appropriate).

    Of course there were others who rapidly and willingly were more than excited to jump out of their scope of practice. Last time I brought my son to the ER when he had a significant laceration that needed sutures, one of the "PCA"/ER Techs tried to administer medication to my son. I asked where they went to nursing school. (They weren't MA's either, MA's were not hired in the hospital though I know some CMA's can administer certain injections). I refused and they huffed off. The one doc chucked, shook his head and reminded the PCA that nursing/medication orders were for NURSES to perform not anyone who reads the chart.

    I found out later (I knew this doc personally for a very long time) that he wrote out an incident report on the situation and the dept started retraining staff to remind them what was in their scope of practice (basic aide skills) and what was not (suture removal, foleys, IV's, medications, anything other than basic wound care, discharge instructions, patient education). A former coworker told me she thought it was entertaining to see those who desired to work out of their scope roll their eyes and huff/puff about being reeducated. the nurse educator told them that if they didn't want to do the job they were hired for, they were more than welcome to resign.

    Needless to say I will drive 15 minutes out of my way to take my son to another hospital system's ER since I know that nursing care is provided by actual licensed nurses not "wanna be"s.

  • Jul 29

    Agencies are not for new grads. They are either staffing agencies to place experienced that need no orientation and the facility pays the fee. Headhunting agencies seek experienced specialty nurses for hard to fill jobs. There are hundreds of not thousands of inexperienced new grad nurses seeking employment. There is no value for an agency to place a new grad. If an agency offers to find you a job for a fee run away.

    Do well. Make an impression during clinical placements. Impress your professors. That's how new grads in impacted areas secure coveted new grad placements in facilities.

  • Jul 29

    The fact that you can only call the "accreditation organization" and they are the only "nursing school" accredited by this organization is a big red flag

  • Jul 29

    Quote from moni24que77
    First off! The school would not be listed on GA board of accreditation because GA is a state body whereas the website clearly states it is accredited by a national body. So that explains that... Secondly, you cannot enroll yourself. It also clearly states that the school admits if you meet the requirements. Third, financial aid is a federal govt program (well known may I add), and the govt does not remit payment to schools not recognized. Your argument is not convincing due to the fact that you clearly DID NOT do any research. I am not backing the school but I am investigating carefully before proceeding. In the event that the nursing part is not as what it seems, I believe that fasfa would be going after there money spent. So honestly there is no inconvenience on my part financially. If I am scammed, then the govt is scammed and I have never seen no one get away with scamming our govt.
    Ummm no. A unheard of national accreditation will not give you the credential needed to take the NCLEX. Only schools approved by a state board of nursing (accreditation is voluntary, board of nursing approval is mandated). If they are operating a nursing school in GA without BoN approval it's an illegal school. You cannot get licensed in any state if the school of nursing is not board of nursing approved.

  • Jul 29

    Want to drive me crazy, call me mom. My son's assistant principal would say "Well mom, I had to call you about son today because..." After 3 night shifts and awoken for the second time for a ridiculous reason by school that is too incompetent to handle my teen I lost it. "I'm not your mother, you are not my child..." I think we broke that habit that very day.

    Fortunately Ive not had that issue with providers.

    I can handle parents of pediatric kids with devastating neurological conditions holding out the last nanogram of hope for progress or recovery even though half the brain was obliterated and a new incident caused further damage.

    What I can not handle is delusional nurses seeking to be the parents' new BFF feeding into the pipe dreams.
    I'm not there to destroy the parents hopes for the impossible recovery (this one parent would probably pray for limb regrowth if an amputation reoccurred) but I will do reality orientation.
    Then the realistic nurses and therapists are evil because delusional nurse thinks random, unreproducable in any setting by anyone else twitches & blinks are morse code sentences that coincide with what answer the nurse wants.
    Sorry those are involuntary myoclonus spasms not answers.
    The only reason the button got pressed is gravity because the teacher held the hand over a button.


    Then there was the parent who was upset at the results of labs & genetic tests shows the twins DO NOT have fatal form of MD. I'm sorry you are upset your children DO NOT have a fatal, life shortening genetic disease? Really? Your upset that they just have low tone because of prematurity? Ok then. I left that case a week later

  • Jul 29

    CNAs don't work under your license. They work under your direction, supervision and delegation. No one else works under your license. As a licensed nurse you are responsible for appropriately delegating, directing and supervising CNAs and other UAPs working with you. As the licensed nurse you are responsible for knowing the UAP/CNA scope as well as facility policy. If you delegate a skilled nursing task to a CNA such as admission assessment or invasive procedure you will be held responsible for improper delegation and the results.

  • Jul 29

    CNAs don't work under your license. They work under your direction, supervision and delegation. No one else works under your license. As a licensed nurse you are responsible for appropriately delegating, directing and supervising CNAs and other UAPs working with you. As the licensed nurse you are responsible for knowing the UAP/CNA scope as well as facility policy. If you delegate a skilled nursing task to a CNA such as admission assessment or invasive procedure you will be held responsible for improper delegation and the results.

  • Jul 29

    Marajuana dealers don't get petty charges. If the quantity is sufficient they can get feeling convictions. It's not the type of drug that determines charges

  • Jul 29

    How is her personal life affecting her work life? Are the drugs being dealt at the nursing home? Is she carrying illegal narcotics and a semi-automatic weapon? Some people are quite capable of keeping work and home separate. A boyfriend with a felony conviction is not necessarily contagious to the girlfriend.

    It sounds as though you are making assumptions, being vindictive and trying to cause trouble not only for the CNA but the facility she works at.

    Does DPR regulate CNAs?

    Ive never seen the board of nursing take action against an otherwise competent and capable nurse because of poor choices in dating unless they were directly involved with the narcotic use or sale

  • Jul 29

    Whether you get a chance to take the exam again is independent of accepting the results cancellation or appeal. Based on the scenario posted I would accept the cancellation and throw myself on the mercy of the BoN for the opportunity to test again. Only the BoN makes the decision to test again. Canceling the exam does not guarantee the ability to retake the NCLEX.

    You made a mistake. You didn't follow the rules that you agreed to abide by. There are consequences. Now you need to think clearly and concisely to accurately respond to this and any other official communication regarding your future potential to become a licensed nurse.

    You might want to consult an attorney to ensure you respond concisely and accurately to the cancellation letter and any future communication from the BoN to protect your future career interests.

    The American Association of Nurse Attorneys has a lawyer referral service. These attorneys are experienced in protecting your best interest with the board of nursing. You have posted a lot of info here including your email address. An attorney consultation may help you consolidate your thoughts and not say the wrong response. www.taana.org

  • Jul 29

    It depends on the school.
    Public or private or commercial
    Practical nursing, diploma, associates, bachelors, masters?
    traditional or accelerated?
    do you have all pre-requisite courses completed with competitive grades (3.7 or higher)?
    what was your gpa in your first degree?
    How impacted is the school? Are there 509 applicants for 30 acceptances? Or rolling admissions?

  • Jul 29

    Quote from Momofason17
    I have at a 3.5 gpa.. i have an associates degree
    Im trying to apply to the school that you all applied to.
    i seriously doubt you are applying to the same school all 900,000 International members applied to. In my school being a medical assistant means nothing as its not a stepping stone to nursing. An associates in an unrelated area wouldn't help either.

  • Jul 29

    CNAs don't work under your license. They work under your direction, supervision and delegation. No one else works under your license. As a licensed nurse you are responsible for appropriately delegating, directing and supervising CNAs and other UAPs working with you. As the licensed nurse you are responsible for knowing the UAP/CNA scope as well as facility policy. If you delegate a skilled nursing task to a CNA such as admission assessment or invasive procedure you will be held responsible for improper delegation and the results.

  • Jul 28

    Quote from Momofason17
    I have at a 3.5 gpa.. i have an associates degree
    Im trying to apply to the school that you all applied to.
    i seriously doubt you are applying to the same school all 900,000 International members applied to. In my school being a medical assistant means nothing as its not a stepping stone to nursing. An associates in an unrelated area wouldn't help either.

  • Jul 28

    How is her personal life affecting her work life? Are the drugs being dealt at the nursing home? Is she carrying illegal narcotics and a semi-automatic weapon? Some people are quite capable of keeping work and home separate. A boyfriend with a felony conviction is not necessarily contagious to the girlfriend.

    It sounds as though you are making assumptions, being vindictive and trying to cause trouble not only for the CNA but the facility she works at.

    Does DPR regulate CNAs?

    Ive never seen the board of nursing take action against an otherwise competent and capable nurse because of poor choices in dating unless they were directly involved with the narcotic use or sale


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