Content That RunawayN Likes

Content That RunawayN Likes

RunawayN 5,654 Views

Joined Apr 29, '10. Posts: 284 (9% Liked) Likes: 30

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  • Dec 26 '15

    Pay loans with 80 percent, save 20 percent. Some people may not agree, but it is wise to do both. If you have an emergency, you'll need some savings.

  • Dec 26 '15

    Grad student loans carry a higher interest rate and the interest capitalizes from day one so I would use the money to pay as I go for the NP. Your other student loans probably have a lower interest rate and if subsidized the interest would not capitalize while you are in school with an approved deferment.

    Also consider changing your withholding so you don't get such a large tax refund; you are simply giving the govt an interest free loan. Why not increase your take home pay and then use it to help pay all your bills now, not at the end of the year.

  • Dec 22 '15

    If I was spending someone else's money I'd get the lotto's. If it was my own, pay off debt.

  • Dec 22 '15

    I'd pay off the loans you already have. You'll get more added to that in NP school.

  • Dec 22 '15

    Lotto buying is generally considered a safe investment . Day dreaming of a millionaire life style is unparalleled .

  • Dec 22 '15

    Pay loans.

    Everyone is going to NP school at the moment.

  • Dec 3 '15

    Be flexible and focus on the patient care & giving excellent care in the specialty that you work in.. are you certified? are you in your professional organization? Being involved there can help you stay abreast of the latest care standards. Learn where & who your resources are & where to find policies for the hospital you are working in.
    I used to do staffing and you have to be ok with not being "involved" in unit politics etc. I liked that part and also the great pay!

  • Dec 3 '15

    Introduce yourself to everyone you see. Ask lots of questions, especially the first day. Always know where the bathroom, med room, and crash cart are. Find out how you know who's on call and how to contact them. Find out how much autonomy they expect/allow (I like to ask my orientation buddy what they do when a pt complains of chest pain - I've had everything from getting an EKG/Troponin and trying SL nitro before calling the doc to calling right away).

    Secretaries usually have an abbreviated phone list with who they call the most. Get a copy, take it home, and make your own list, shrink it down and put it on a card that'll fit in one of your scrub pockets or behind your badge.

    On the other side of the card, put all the door codes/passwords you need in random order. For important ones like your EMR password, make up one or two dummies that have the same format and include them on the card. Technically, you shouldn't write that stuff down, but when somebody looks at a sheet with 20 different passwords in random order with no login, they're not gonna know which is which. If it's good enough for nuclear launch codes... Just be sure to hide it in your skivvies if Joint Commission comes around.

  • Dec 3 '15

    The first few days every contract it's like being the new kid at school. Although the good news is after a few times you become good at being the new kid, so to speak. In the ICU you will rely heavily on your orientation nurse and charge nurse your first few days, charting style, protocols, unit rules, etc. After about 5 or 6 shifts though I usually feel right at home and practicing independent. Of course for tiny administration details and such I mostly call on the charge nurse to handle.

    As for telephone number and door codes I keep a small paper pad in my pocket with the important ones written down. I use the operator usually to connect me to wherever I need to call and the secretaries know me well for my needs with clerical stuff. Just give them a smile and say thank you and they typically don't mind helping you out. When every three months you change hospitals it's not feasible for you to learn all the phone numbers and small clerical details.

  • Dec 3 '15

    By the way, that feeling is actually a good thing. It keeps you sharp and improving professionally. No chance of falling into a rut or taking shortcuts.

  • Dec 3 '15

    Eventually they will all become the same. Just learn to introduce yourself to everyone, all the time....

  • Dec 3 '15

    It will get better the more hospitals you go to.

  • Nov 14 '15

    If you aren't happy where you're at in your career then change something. You have enough experience to go back to school, whether it be to get you MSN or whatever. Get some experience in the ICU and you can apply for NP or CRNA school. You can travel, you can teach.... the possibilities with nursing are endless! Do your research and reach for the stars.

  • Aug 3 '15

    Here's the current union contracts for all the different UCs. The wage tables for UCSF start on page 163.

    Link: http://ucnet.universityofcalifornia....e-contract.pdf

  • Aug 3 '15

    It makes sense to accept an offer from Hospital A and then to rescind that acceptance once Hospital B extends an offer. But make certain that the offer from Hospital B is a firm offer or you may find yourself out in the cold.


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