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mammac5 9,467 Views

Joined Nov 10, '09. Posts: 735 (30% Liked) Likes: 484

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  • Nov 2

    Quote from Riburn3
    This is your own anecdote and does not represent NPs or even nursing as a whole. Not feeling respected or feeling respected has more to do with where you are working versus what you are doing.

    Similarly, just because your hospital system is not respectful, doesn't mean all are that way. My anecdote is that NPs at my hospital are treated as providers and afforded all the privileges of physicians, including premium parking, physician lounge access, etc. I personally don't know an NP in my area that doesn't feel valued and respected. The ones that I know that have felt that way got new jobs.
    *shrugging my shoulders* I thought we were being asked for our own anecdotal experiences. I've never once claimed to respond in any way to represent all NPs or all RNs.
    Responses like these are one of the reasons why I come to AllNurses now and then, realize people on here sometimes want to nitpick and get angry, so then I won't contribute again for months. Life's too short.

  • Oct 21

    I've been practicing over 3 years now. Graduated in August, passed ANP exam in September, started work in October. I'm in North Carolina. My job offer was a surprise and was entirely thanks to contacts I made during my clinicals.

  • Sep 29

    Quote from smrn2
    thank you two sooo much for the info, yess i am planning on getting acls certified this month. do you feel np school is just as difficult as a 4 yr nursing school or is it more layed back (all online) is it mostly writing research papers and clinicals or more exam based like an undergraduate degree. i would much rather write papers
    of course each program is different, but the basics should be the same in any accredited program. lots of scholarly writing projects. online (or live) lectures and tests. clinical hours, which may be a mix of primary care and specialty sites if you're in a primary care specialty. if you're acnp then clinicals will be hospital-based. if you're psych then you will see patients in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. the program(s) you're looking at will tell you how many hours of clinicals you will need to complete for your program.

    for me the np program was as stressful as undergrad rn program, but in different ways. all during the rn program i was terrified that i would not be able to pass nclex - i was very focused on that. during the np program i was more concerned about doing/saying something completely idiotic during clinicals, either to a patient or to a preceptor.

  • Sep 29

    Well, I'll jump in here and say that you will get a whole host of responses to this question, but there is no "rule."

    Some will say the RN should work for 2 years or 5 years, and I'm not saying there's anything wrong with that view. I will say that there are a whole of us that did not work as nurses (or hospital nurses, anyway) but went directly into an NP program and have done very well.

    Some experience can be very valuable, and others maybe not so much. For instance I talked to someone who had worked for a year or so in a skilled nursing facility with elderly folks...and was in a midwifery NP program.

  • Aug 21

    Well, I'll jump in here and say that you will get a whole host of responses to this question, but there is no "rule."

    Some will say the RN should work for 2 years or 5 years, and I'm not saying there's anything wrong with that view. I will say that there are a whole of us that did not work as nurses (or hospital nurses, anyway) but went directly into an NP program and have done very well.

    Some experience can be very valuable, and others maybe not so much. For instance I talked to someone who had worked for a year or so in a skilled nursing facility with elderly folks...and was in a midwifery NP program.

  • Jul 1

    Quote from Riburn3
    This is your own anecdote and does not represent NPs or even nursing as a whole. Not feeling respected or feeling respected has more to do with where you are working versus what you are doing.

    Similarly, just because your hospital system is not respectful, doesn't mean all are that way. My anecdote is that NPs at my hospital are treated as providers and afforded all the privileges of physicians, including premium parking, physician lounge access, etc. I personally don't know an NP in my area that doesn't feel valued and respected. The ones that I know that have felt that way got new jobs.
    *shrugging my shoulders* I thought we were being asked for our own anecdotal experiences. I've never once claimed to respond in any way to represent all NPs or all RNs.
    Responses like these are one of the reasons why I come to AllNurses now and then, realize people on here sometimes want to nitpick and get angry, so then I won't contribute again for months. Life's too short.

  • May 30

    My mother completed an RN program several years ago and was not taught how to draw blood...then she accepted a job in an outpatient pediatrics clinic a few years later. I taught her how to draw at my kitchen table so she'd know by the time she started her job!

    Lots of inpatient settings use phlebotomists from the lab to get all their draws; they use IV teams to start lines. Not all nurses do these skills so many of us are not learning them in school.

  • May 30

    Many programs teach access for insertion of IVs and/or drawing from central or peripheral lines, but not venipuncture in the "outpatient" sense of the word. You can learn this at a hospital or local CC that has a course...usually short.

    I learned as a Certified Med Assist, but nurses don't usually learn this until on the job, or never.

  • May 22

    A & P is important; we assume everyone knows where the parts are located (the A) but many people get through basic courses without really knowing how everything works AND how it all works together (the P).

    I would review the autonomic nervous system function, renal function, and all the chemistry that is in the A & P text. Chemistry is vital for learning about acid/base balance, appropriate fluid maintenance, and understanding how drugs work.

    The program I'm in is an accelerated one, so everyone's experience is going to be different. I'm a pretty good student and not new to the world of healthcare, but I can say that the areas that have been the greatest challenge to me are acid/base, fluids & electrolytes, and hemodynamics. All of those require understanding of chemistry and memorization of lots of numbers.

    Best of luck and hold onto your enthusiam!

  • Apr 25

    Quote from Riburn3
    This is your own anecdote and does not represent NPs or even nursing as a whole. Not feeling respected or feeling respected has more to do with where you are working versus what you are doing.

    Similarly, just because your hospital system is not respectful, doesn't mean all are that way. My anecdote is that NPs at my hospital are treated as providers and afforded all the privileges of physicians, including premium parking, physician lounge access, etc. I personally don't know an NP in my area that doesn't feel valued and respected. The ones that I know that have felt that way got new jobs.
    *shrugging my shoulders* I thought we were being asked for our own anecdotal experiences. I've never once claimed to respond in any way to represent all NPs or all RNs.
    Responses like these are one of the reasons why I come to AllNurses now and then, realize people on here sometimes want to nitpick and get angry, so then I won't contribute again for months. Life's too short.

  • Apr 8

    Quote from Riburn3
    This is your own anecdote and does not represent NPs or even nursing as a whole. Not feeling respected or feeling respected has more to do with where you are working versus what you are doing.

    Similarly, just because your hospital system is not respectful, doesn't mean all are that way. My anecdote is that NPs at my hospital are treated as providers and afforded all the privileges of physicians, including premium parking, physician lounge access, etc. I personally don't know an NP in my area that doesn't feel valued and respected. The ones that I know that have felt that way got new jobs.
    *shrugging my shoulders* I thought we were being asked for our own anecdotal experiences. I've never once claimed to respond in any way to represent all NPs or all RNs.
    Responses like these are one of the reasons why I come to AllNurses now and then, realize people on here sometimes want to nitpick and get angry, so then I won't contribute again for months. Life's too short.

  • Apr 7

    Quote from Riburn3
    This is your own anecdote and does not represent NPs or even nursing as a whole. Not feeling respected or feeling respected has more to do with where you are working versus what you are doing.

    Similarly, just because your hospital system is not respectful, doesn't mean all are that way. My anecdote is that NPs at my hospital are treated as providers and afforded all the privileges of physicians, including premium parking, physician lounge access, etc. I personally don't know an NP in my area that doesn't feel valued and respected. The ones that I know that have felt that way got new jobs.
    *shrugging my shoulders* I thought we were being asked for our own anecdotal experiences. I've never once claimed to respond in any way to represent all NPs or all RNs.
    Responses like these are one of the reasons why I come to AllNurses now and then, realize people on here sometimes want to nitpick and get angry, so then I won't contribute again for months. Life's too short.

  • Mar 28

    Quote from Riburn3
    This is your own anecdote and does not represent NPs or even nursing as a whole. Not feeling respected or feeling respected has more to do with where you are working versus what you are doing.

    Similarly, just because your hospital system is not respectful, doesn't mean all are that way. My anecdote is that NPs at my hospital are treated as providers and afforded all the privileges of physicians, including premium parking, physician lounge access, etc. I personally don't know an NP in my area that doesn't feel valued and respected. The ones that I know that have felt that way got new jobs.
    *shrugging my shoulders* I thought we were being asked for our own anecdotal experiences. I've never once claimed to respond in any way to represent all NPs or all RNs.
    Responses like these are one of the reasons why I come to AllNurses now and then, realize people on here sometimes want to nitpick and get angry, so then I won't contribute again for months. Life's too short.

  • Mar 13

    A & P is important; we assume everyone knows where the parts are located (the A) but many people get through basic courses without really knowing how everything works AND how it all works together (the P).

    I would review the autonomic nervous system function, renal function, and all the chemistry that is in the A & P text. Chemistry is vital for learning about acid/base balance, appropriate fluid maintenance, and understanding how drugs work.

    The program I'm in is an accelerated one, so everyone's experience is going to be different. I'm a pretty good student and not new to the world of healthcare, but I can say that the areas that have been the greatest challenge to me are acid/base, fluids & electrolytes, and hemodynamics. All of those require understanding of chemistry and memorization of lots of numbers.

    Best of luck and hold onto your enthusiam!

  • Mar 11

    Well, I'll jump in here and say that you will get a whole host of responses to this question, but there is no "rule."

    Some will say the RN should work for 2 years or 5 years, and I'm not saying there's anything wrong with that view. I will say that there are a whole of us that did not work as nurses (or hospital nurses, anyway) but went directly into an NP program and have done very well.

    Some experience can be very valuable, and others maybe not so much. For instance I talked to someone who had worked for a year or so in a skilled nursing facility with elderly folks...and was in a midwifery NP program.


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