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tokmom, BSN, RN 41,496 Views

Joined Aug 20, '09 - from 'Somewhere in the USA'. tokmom is a CMSRN. She has '30' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Certified Med/Surg tele, and other stuff'. Posts: 4,674 (61% Liked) Likes: 8,613

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  • Aug 12

    consider yourself lucky to be out of there.

  • Aug 11

    Well call me Susie Sunshine! I love my job and look forward to going back and doing it all over again the next week.
    Do I have bad days? Of course I do. Does the guy that works at Microsoft have them too? Yes, he does!

    Would I choose nursing if I had to do it over again? I most likely would. I can't imagine not doing this profession. I'm proud to be an RN.

    Just for the record, you do run into bullying pt's that would love to take a smack at you, but many in my life are old and confused and don't know any better. Those that do know better are thankfully far and few between.

    Don't know what is up with your co workers, but again, all floors are different. Some are very tight. I happen to work with some exceptionally nice people. Is their gossip and occasional backstabbing? Yeah, I hear it, but other jobs do that as well. As long as there are more than 2 people in a room you will have gossip.

    If this is something that you want to do, then ignore the message boards and go study instead.

  • Aug 4

    Quote from macgirl
    i believe i was asking about that. also, it takes 2 nurse to verify the blood would it be really so hard for another nurse to start the blood? after all they would just need to spike the bag and get it going. i could do something for them instead like wound care if it was a time issue.
    blood transfusions are very time consuming. you coudn't do enough for them to make it equal, other than taking over the care of their patients.
    with that being said, look into home health or something of that nature. maybe outpatient surgery center?

  • Jul 19

    I have this recurring dream that has me working at this inner city hospital on a hill and the hospital is huge complete with escalators, lol. Anyway, the cafeteria is awesome with tons of food, nicely lit, with large windows. I seem to bounce back and forth from the upstairs of the hospital floors where all the sick people are to the cafeteria. My unit is filled with dozens of stretchers with sick people. I look at the work load and mayhem and panic. I go back to the cafeteria, even though I know I should be upstairs working. It is the most bizarre dream!!

  • Jul 8

    One of my favorite quotes:

    "In traditional Native American teaching, it is said that each time you heal someone, you give away a piece of yourself until, at some point, you will require healing.”
    ~Native American Quote

  • Jul 8

    You forgot CNA's that think they are MD's. I work with one of those...

  • Jul 6

    I have been at my current facility for two years now, and have seen 5 nurses let go. Another is on the chopping block but doesn't seem to want to change her ways.
    People don't get fired for occassional and minor med errors. They get repeated warnings for laziness, lack of teamwork, absenteeism.

  • Jun 23

    I got out for almost 5 yrs. I needed to. I did keep my license current and came back only to embrace my profession. It does happen.

    Good luck to you and your new future.

  • Jun 21

    Op, excellent question. I have no idea where the idea of med/surg being a sucky place to work ever started. We probably will never know. Nurses who work on med/surg are viewed as "less than," and not a true specialty. We are ONLY med-surg nurses (rolling eyes). It boggles my mind that a bunch of grown woman (because nursing is primarily women) LOVE to bash other specialties and consider them less than. It's so freaking childish. We will never EVER move forward and have the respect of society and other health care professionals until we start liking each other!

    I enjoy med/surg and will never leave unless I leave bedside altogether. It rankles my hide to hear new grads say they are being tortured having to work med/surg and can't wait to leave. Constant turn-over is bad for moral and many never give it a chance.
    I enjoy the challenge of the patients and family. I see people become well and go home and I'm proud to be a part of the process.
    I have worked a variety of departments and I kept going back to med/surg. I always found something "wrong" with the other department such as not using my critical thinking skills or monotonous/assembly line care. One day I realized that I'm a true blue med/surg nurse. I'm certified in med/surgical and very proud of my RN-C.

  • Jun 16

    Quote from Ruby Vee
    The OP isn't the one who said she hated bedside nursing. In fact, it seems like the OP cannot understand why others seem to hate Med/Surg so much. VAnurse2010 is the one with the horrible attitude about bedside nursing.

    If you've decided that you hate bedside nursing and won't even TRY to find aspects of the job that you like and enjoy, if you just concentrate on how much "it all sucks", then you're not GOING to find any positive aspects to the job, and you'll be miserable. You tend to find what you're looking for, and if all you look for is negative, that's all you'll find. It's a miserable attitude, and it's one destined to make you even more miserable.

    I once hated bedside nursing, too. Then I decided that since I had to do it to support my family, until something "better" came along, then I'd make up my mind to find aspects of it that I enjoyed. And wouldn't you know it -- when something "better" did come along, I was enjoying the bedside so much I didn't want to leave.
    I can't like this enough.

    That was ME years ago. I had the attitude just like that and I KNOW I was toxic to the floor. Do you know what I did? I QUIT nursing. Yep, and I don't think my coworkers missed me much.
    Eventually, I had to return to nursing and you can bet my attitude needed an adjustment and it was up to me to do it, not my manager, not my coworkers. I had to FIND the GOOD in nursing again and I did.
    I found that passion (yes, a much hated word on AN), and I reconnected with the patient. I became involved in policy changes and the workings of the floor. Instead of whining how awful it was, I FIXED it. I negotiate our contract, and help develop policy and procedures. I'm passionate about the profession of the Med/Surg nurse and nursing in general. I do not wear rose colored glasses and I'm a true realist. My goal is to have my nurses and team members rediscover their spark and remember why they wanted to become nurses in the first place. I fight for them as a floor and encourage them to join me.

    To those that hate med/surg nursing so badly...get out. It's really simple. As I have said before, you are a toxic co-worker to the environment.

    While I'm on my soapbox, I totally detest nurses that come to the Med/Surg nurse thread and whine about their med/surg job and how much it sucks. I don't go to other threads on AN and bash how awful being an ICU, ED, dialysis, or another other nurse is. Do you think they want to hear it?
    I think the med/surg thread should be for those actually interested in Med/Surg

  • Jun 16

    Quote from tarotale
    I don't blame the original poster. Lots of people hate bedside, me included. The bs of bedside she mentioned is definitely there and can't deny it. Some people can tolerate the bs. Others can't stand it which makes us hate bedside.

    Like there isn't BS in management? I'm a fence sitter job wise, so I see both sides. There is crap everywhere in every specialty and job role.

  • Jun 16

    Quote from la_chica_suerte85
    I've seen this a lot, too and it especially gets touted by some of the nurses that float to the med-surg floors I've been on. I think there's a certain degree of "flash" and status that comes with being in a specialty but with Med-Surg, you have to be all things to all people. The time management, the total care pts (i.e. you are the sole caregiver -- no PCT, no CNA, no one to help you), the range of diseases/syndromes and everything else requires someone who has a broad knowledge base and excellent organization skills. I don't really get where this idea came from, though. I can see the excitement with higher acuity and maybe the more complex med admin and assessment but you really have to be on your toes in Med-Surg just as much. At the end of the day, anywhere is a good place to start. Experience is the most valuable thing.
    Med/Surg IS a specialty. Nobody seems to realize that.

    Any floor can and will be awful, with high rates of burnout, if staffing is sub par. Again, it's NOT med/surg that is horrible, it is what management does to med/surg that is so terribly wrong.

  • Jun 16

    Op, excellent question. I have no idea where the idea of med/surg being a sucky place to work ever started. We probably will never know. Nurses who work on med/surg are viewed as "less than," and not a true specialty. We are ONLY med-surg nurses (rolling eyes). It boggles my mind that a bunch of grown woman (because nursing is primarily women) LOVE to bash other specialties and consider them less than. It's so freaking childish. We will never EVER move forward and have the respect of society and other health care professionals until we start liking each other!

    I enjoy med/surg and will never leave unless I leave bedside altogether. It rankles my hide to hear new grads say they are being tortured having to work med/surg and can't wait to leave. Constant turn-over is bad for moral and many never give it a chance.
    I enjoy the challenge of the patients and family. I see people become well and go home and I'm proud to be a part of the process.
    I have worked a variety of departments and I kept going back to med/surg. I always found something "wrong" with the other department such as not using my critical thinking skills or monotonous/assembly line care. One day I realized that I'm a true blue med/surg nurse. I'm certified in med/surgical and very proud of my RN-C.

  • Jun 15

    Quote from la_chica_suerte85
    I've seen this a lot, too and it especially gets touted by some of the nurses that float to the med-surg floors I've been on. I think there's a certain degree of "flash" and status that comes with being in a specialty but with Med-Surg, you have to be all things to all people. The time management, the total care pts (i.e. you are the sole caregiver -- no PCT, no CNA, no one to help you), the range of diseases/syndromes and everything else requires someone who has a broad knowledge base and excellent organization skills. I don't really get where this idea came from, though. I can see the excitement with higher acuity and maybe the more complex med admin and assessment but you really have to be on your toes in Med-Surg just as much. At the end of the day, anywhere is a good place to start. Experience is the most valuable thing.
    Med/Surg IS a specialty. Nobody seems to realize that.

    Any floor can and will be awful, with high rates of burnout, if staffing is sub par. Again, it's NOT med/surg that is horrible, it is what management does to med/surg that is so terribly wrong.

  • May 29

    Quote from la_chica_suerte85
    I've seen this a lot, too and it especially gets touted by some of the nurses that float to the med-surg floors I've been on. I think there's a certain degree of "flash" and status that comes with being in a specialty but with Med-Surg, you have to be all things to all people. The time management, the total care pts (i.e. you are the sole caregiver -- no PCT, no CNA, no one to help you), the range of diseases/syndromes and everything else requires someone who has a broad knowledge base and excellent organization skills. I don't really get where this idea came from, though. I can see the excitement with higher acuity and maybe the more complex med admin and assessment but you really have to be on your toes in Med-Surg just as much. At the end of the day, anywhere is a good place to start. Experience is the most valuable thing.
    Med/Surg IS a specialty. Nobody seems to realize that.

    Any floor can and will be awful, with high rates of burnout, if staffing is sub par. Again, it's NOT med/surg that is horrible, it is what management does to med/surg that is so terribly wrong.


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