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tokmom, BSN, RN 39,775 Views

Joined Aug 20, '09 - from 'Somewhere in the USA'. tokmom is a CMSRN. She has '30' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Certified Med/Surg tele, and other stuff'. Posts: 4,671 (61% Liked) Likes: 8,595

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  • May 11

    This is so true. Drinking fluids at work can be difficult at times because no food or drink can be at the station.

  • Apr 25

    That's fine. ICU makes me want to scream. Just remember as an ICU nurse, you may only have 2 patients, but those nurses are busy too. It's very high pressure as well with those patients being so critical. You constantly need to be on guard for any subtle signs of crashing.

    Personally, you sound overwhelmed, period. Even nurseries can be very busy. BTDT With missed lunches.

    I'm going to tell you something you might not want to hear, but I think you need to stick this out. If you can work Med/Surg, you can work anywhere. It teaches you to multi task and you learn how to deal with a variety of people. Most if not all jobs, including OB jobs, REQUIRE at least 1-2 years of Med/Surg FOR that reason.

    I have worked all over various fields of hospital nursing, and mother/baby is my first love. However, I don't currently work there, lol. I got out of nursing for 4 yrs for personal reasons and went back in FT 2 yrs ago. I started on a med/surg floor and like you, that first day cried all the way home. Even with 16 yrs of an RN under my belt I was overwhelmed. It's a scary place to be. The computer system was frightening and I didn't think I would ever get my groove back. Well, long story short, a month into it, I did fine and life is fine. I just had to give myself some extra time to re adjust and ask questions if I was stuck on something.

    For the record, those nurses most likely get preceptor pay, so essentially are getting paid to help you get situated.

    Get your year or two under your belt and then move on. You will be glad you did. Trust me on this one.

  • Apr 24

    I was out for almost 5 yrs with my kids and I said just that on my resume and in my interview. When I was asked if I had lost my skills, I was very confident in my answer which was a No. I also had my CPR and ACLS updated though to help sell myself a bit more. I was bringing to them my years of experience of which I did play up.
    The only downside was taking a bit of a pay cut. Even though I had been an RN on license for 20 odd years, they did start me at a lower pay scale by deducting the years I was out of nursing.

  • Apr 12

    My philosophy:

    1) Make no med errors

    2) catch any pt circling the drain before they code

    3) get out on time

    4) get my lunch at the very least

    5) Be mindful of burn out

  • Apr 6

    Quote from Paco-RN
    My PERSONAL experience is that med-surg nursing is perceived as a dumping ground, and (except for California) a higher than normal patient load is the norm and nurses are expected to deal with it. There is very little time to spend with patients and an exorbitant number of tasks to complete. Too much babysitting and not enough time to critically think. It is viewed as the place where you start out your nursing career and then move on to critical care or more lucrative specialties after you have the requisite experience under your belt. I've even heard others comment that some excellent nurses are "too smart" a nurse to stay on a med-surg unit, and that critical care nurses are more astute clinicians. Med-surg nurses have to move their patients to higher level of care when they decompensate enough and they have restrictions on what they can or cannot push or what interventions they can or cannot allow (i.e., no continuous pulse ox monitoring or continuous nonrebreather use on a med surg floor). In this sense, the critical care nurse is viewed as a better or more qualified nurse. In this day and age, few newer nurses seem to tolerate the idea that they have limitations on the care they can provide to their patients.

    I'm not saying this is the truth for EVERY med-surg unit, just saying that this is the perception from where I stand and live, and why someone here too would crinkle their nose at the idea of going into med-surg. It's no wonder many new grads are killing puppies at the chance to start out in ICU or other critical care. Charting on 2 patients is viewed as a hell of a lot less onerous than charting on 6.

    And btw, the concept of starting out in med surg for a year and transferring out to another specialty seems to be slowly dying. Many specialty RN job listings are beginning to specify experience in the specialty as the preferred qualification for the opening (i.e., 2 years critical care or ER experience for ER or ICU) and med-surg is no longer enough. Maybe this is a result of oversaturation of qualified candidates in the job market and employers can be more choosy. So the idea of starting out in med-surg and being stuck there seems to be a growing concern. It's harder now to change to a specialty after med surg. Also, this could be a regional thing, but again, that's how things are perceived around here.




    Sent from my iPad using allnurses
    No continuous pulse ox on your floor? Holy cow, that is dumbing down nurses. Heck, I have worked med/surg where I did conscious sedation, and injected epidurals.

  • Mar 16

    Quote from monkeybug
    Oh, but don't let a nurse manager or admin in the US hear you say that! We're supposed to be better than a hotel. In fact, our reimbursement is going to be tied to patient satisfaction. If that's not a case of the inmates running the asylum, I don't know what is. If you are a non-compliant diabetic, good nursing care dictates that I not provide a slice of chocolate cake with an ice cream chaser, but patient satisfaction says I should. And now, we'll be dinged if the non-compliant diabetic goes home unhappy but alive. At least if they're dead they can't complain, I guess. It puts nurses in an impossible position.
    Amen..

    We do courtesy calls within 24 hours after discharge. The calls are automated, but if there is an untoward comment, it goes to a manager or charge nurse who has to return the call. How do they know there is a disgruntled person? They have to carry a pager!

    Well, I will be getting a disgruntled phone call this week. I'm the poor sucker that has to carry the pager AND I do discharges.

    I d/c'd a pt last week, who was a very negative person and was difficult to discharge. As a courtesy, even though I was freaking swamped, I offered to fax in her script which I did and as I always do, gave her back the hardcopy. As you can imagine, my fax said it went through and when she got to the pharmacy, apparently it did not. She was so mad, she didn't even give them the hard copy and wait for them. Instead she went home without her meds and called us to complain.

  • Mar 2

    Quote from jenovievictoria
    Hello,

    I am interested to know has anyone who has graduated from this program received an MSN from a different college afterwards? Is a BSN from GCU accepted at all schools?

    Yes, just like any other school that is accredited. Echoing Flames. It is a 'real' school, complete with a 'real' campus, sports teams, dorms and nursing program. I know others that have gone on for their NP to other schools.

  • Feb 22

    I do. I never intended to stay in med/surg, but I always found my way back. I've worked same day, mother baby, GI, and did brief stints in ED and PCU. Even though I liked those departments, I became bored with them. Med/surg offered variety without the intensity of ICU.

    I finally realized that I was a true blue med/surg nurse and embraced my decision, lol. I became certified in med/surg and now fight for med/surg nurses, which is a specialty!

    One thing before I go...and I'm getting on soapbox... Med/surg is NOT a bad place to work. What makes it suck is the management that short staffs the department, therefore burning out the nurses.

  • Feb 3

    I do. I never intended to stay in med/surg, but I always found my way back. I've worked same day, mother baby, GI, and did brief stints in ED and PCU. Even though I liked those departments, I became bored with them. Med/surg offered variety without the intensity of ICU.

    I finally realized that I was a true blue med/surg nurse and embraced my decision, lol. I became certified in med/surg and now fight for med/surg nurses, which is a specialty!

    One thing before I go...and I'm getting on soapbox... Med/surg is NOT a bad place to work. What makes it suck is the management that short staffs the department, therefore burning out the nurses.

  • Jan 23

    Quote from Flames9_RN
    Not too concerned at the moment..ty for the info..back to football
    No, you shouldn't be, Flames. You graduated. This is for the 2016/2017 folks. This is why I posted. A simple heads up.

  • Jan 21

    Hey peeps, this is going to be long and probably not popular amongst you all. It wasn't for me. My goal is to save some heartache along the way.

    As I was cruising my states nursing forum, I stumbled across a post that mentioned a person having trouble getting accepted into an online school because they are not taking XXX state residents as students.
    Another poster chimed in and mentioned that a NEW FEDERAL LAW is taking affect and not all states are accepting GCU's RN-BSN program because it has no practicum. Yes, they want you to work as a nurse to get a nursing degree, even though we work as nurses now.

    The original poster went to our BON and found an online list of acceptable schools and GCU was there (yay!), however, ONLY the MSN programs were listed, not the RN-BSN. As you can imagine, I went into panic mode and emailed the BON. I also sent a text to a buddy I went through GCU with me who lives in another state. She checked her list of schools and GCU isn't listed at all now.

    The good news for us, after a couple of sleepless nights is we are grandfathered in because we graduated close to 3 years ago. However, we MUST go to an MSN school on the list for our states BON if we wish to continue. Otherwise our BON will not recognize the education.
    Those that are in the program currently will need to be waivered but may still have issues with licensing.

    So peeps, go to your state BON and make sure that GCU is on the approved online school list.

    I know the intent is to cut down on diploma mills, but there are a TON of online for profit schools listed on my BON website. (rolling eyes).

  • Jan 21

    Not rn-centered, but pandorasbox and I have been in classes for 4 classes now. What do you want to know? We are set to take stats in 3 weeks.

  • Jan 1

    Med/surg is a specialty and has it's own certification.

  • Dec 29 '16

    [QUOTE=shodobe;6672205]Almost 60 and still working like a fool. It also helps to have a skill in areas that are hard to staff, like me in the OR. I have 35 years in the OR that can't be readliy matched by a newbie, just because they make way less than I. I still outwork and outthink the youngsters and cover way more call than I should, like today. So obtaining skills that are hard to replace make you very marketable and hard to get rid of. Just don't lock yourself on that Med/Surg floor for 20 or so years because you CAN be replaced.[/QUOTE

    I find that comment a bit insulting. Since you have 35 yrs of OR experience, when was the last time you even worked a med/surg floor?
    Any nurse, anywhere can be replaced. I saw it happen to my friend. 20 yrs in OR, now scrambling to find a job. No real just cause. She worked a non union facility and one day she was let go.

    As for us Med/Surg nurses, like any SPECIALTY, keep yourself current on education and then some. Become certified. Get yourself involved in 'behind the scenes' work with the fluffy stuff as one poster called it. Make yourself known. Help develop policies..anything to make yourself invaluable. Does it make you invincible? No, but it helps.

    I have made myself a nice little niche on a Med/Surg floor, same as a couple of co workers. We are highly involved in the running of the floor. I have put myself out there to learn how my floor works to the point I do a lot of managerial stuff for my boss when he needs extra help. We are certified and we are always involved in committees.

  • Dec 28 '16

    Quote from RiskManager
    Bear in mind that NSO is just the insurance agent. CNA is the insurance company that writes the actual policy. NSO just collects the premium, passes it along to CNA minus the commission, and does some servicing of the policy. You have two real choices for the insurance, CNA or Liberty Mutual. You can buy the policies from other insurance agents, and you need not go through NSO or ProLiability, the agent for Liberty Mutual.
    So can we just google CNA an go straight through them an leave out the middleman?


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