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tokmom, BSN, RN 36,909 Views

Joined Aug 20, '09 - from 'Somewhere in the USA'. tokmom is a CMSRN. She has '30' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Certified Med/Surg tele, and other stuff'. Posts: 4,640 (61% Liked) Likes: 8,570

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  • 3:32 pm

    Quote from TriciaJ
    Nowadays you can't open a nursing journal without someone crowing about "work-life balance". I just roll my eyes. I do enjoy work-life balance now, working on-call at a minimally stressful job. But most of my previous nursing jobs ate my life. As long as hospitals keep pushing the staffing envelope, work-life balance is something many nurses can only dream of.
    I think nursing journals DO need to push work/balance mindset. You CAN have both. I find myself very balanced in my job, even though I do committee work on top of my normal 36 hours. My balance is not answering the phone on my days off, and making sure my off days are truly *off*.

    Nurses need to be cognizant of their emotional well being and if it takes beating it into their heads that they need to balance life, then so be it.

    I commend any nursing magazine that educates about burnout, over and over again. The word has got to get out, or the trend will continue.

  • 3:30 pm

    Having gone off the ledge and away from the profession and back in again, I finally learned a few things about nursing in general and myself.

    1) if your unit sucks, then leave. I spent 16 years at my last job thinking it was bad everywhere, therefore I stayed and dealt with lack of teamwork and horrible staffing ratios.

    2) It is important for a nurse to take care of themselves. Exercise, journal, pamper yourself. My big indulgence is Starbucks for my Chai tea, lol. I also have crafts and gardening that I enjoy that take my attention away from family and work..

    3) Others stay sane by disconnecting from work, and yet some, like me, actually feel MORE engaged by doing committee work, and changing the work environment one project at a time. I always thought this mindset was sort of weird, but actually it is one burnout cure-all for a select few. I enjoy going toe to toe with managers during negotiations, lol. It's rather cathartic.

    So do whatever works.

  • Dec 2

    Yeah, I'm all to familiar with abusive behavior. I had a pt's son be a threat to me and the staff. He was over 6 feet tall and easily weighed more then 300 lbs. He also told us he had an anger issue. When we didn't medicate his father quickly enough, all hell broke loose, even though it wasn't time for the medication to be given. He threatened us, big time. I won't go into details for obvious reasons, but the secretary looked at me and I nodded for her to call security. Even the RT who is a guy, backed off.
    I then went to my manager and talked to him. He went and talked to the son and then manager came to the desk to talk to us. He told us calling security was a bad idea, it would ramp up the son. We were only to call security if the son gave us 'direct and threatening eye contact.' I told my boss I would call security if *I* felt threatened and wasn't going to wait for this giant of a man to get that close to me so I could be hit and THEN call security!!

  • Dec 1

    Quote from Diane-RN in Michigan
    I struggle when the occasional hospice pt says "I've hurt a lot of people, I deserve this."
    That makes me sad.

  • Nov 25

    My certification was up for the five year renewal and of course I drew the short stick and was audited, lol.
    I learned some important things I wanted to pass along to those that maybe audited by MSNCB.

    1) keep your tracker current on MSNCB. You have to prove what is on the tracker.

    2) keep as many ceu as you can through AMSN. one is allowed 30 a year. You don't have to submit them as they automatically count.

    3) if you are claiming schooling, keep an official copy of your transcript at the ready.They will ask for it.

    4) if you have outside ceu, take the time to scan and upload. When MSNCB asks for them, you have them ready to go.

    5) You get approximately 2 weeks to pull this information together.

  • Nov 22

    My certification was up for the five year renewal and of course I drew the short stick and was audited, lol.
    I learned some important things I wanted to pass along to those that maybe audited by MSNCB.

    1) keep your tracker current on MSNCB. You have to prove what is on the tracker.

    2) keep as many ceu as you can through AMSN. one is allowed 30 a year. You don't have to submit them as they automatically count.

    3) if you are claiming schooling, keep an official copy of your transcript at the ready.They will ask for it.

    4) if you have outside ceu, take the time to scan and upload. When MSNCB asks for them, you have them ready to go.

    5) You get approximately 2 weeks to pull this information together.

  • Nov 13

    We had one doc that loved to have dramatic temper tantrums. Throwing charts, pens and flopping down in a chair throwing his arms up in the air.

    One day doc was having a whopper of a tantrum. The chart went sliding down the station floor, a pen went whizzing past someones head. The dr the flung himself in a chair. Guess what? As he sat down, the chair, with wheels, moved. Doc hit the ground hard, lol. Sort of put a damper on his drama.

    The rest of us scattered like mice, snickering down the hall, and left him sitting there.

  • Nov 3

    Having gone off the ledge and away from the profession and back in again, I finally learned a few things about nursing in general and myself.

    1) if your unit sucks, then leave. I spent 16 years at my last job thinking it was bad everywhere, therefore I stayed and dealt with lack of teamwork and horrible staffing ratios.

    2) It is important for a nurse to take care of themselves. Exercise, journal, pamper yourself. My big indulgence is Starbucks for my Chai tea, lol. I also have crafts and gardening that I enjoy that take my attention away from family and work..

    3) Others stay sane by disconnecting from work, and yet some, like me, actually feel MORE engaged by doing committee work, and changing the work environment one project at a time. I always thought this mindset was sort of weird, but actually it is one burnout cure-all for a select few. I enjoy going toe to toe with managers during negotiations, lol. It's rather cathartic.

    So do whatever works.

  • Oct 28

    Quote from Hancock330
    In some places, state regulations REQUIRE employers of RNs and LPNs to put their status in letters an inch high on their name tags. This can be VERY helpful to rational patients. Those with dementia probably won't know but everyone else will be able to tell. Even folks who don't have their glasses on will be able to tell if "this person is a nurse" when the person gets close to the patient.
    Except our badges flip over...all the time...UGH.

  • Oct 24

    Quote from Hancock330
    In some places, state regulations REQUIRE employers of RNs and LPNs to put their status in letters an inch high on their name tags. This can be VERY helpful to rational patients. Those with dementia probably won't know but everyone else will be able to tell. Even folks who don't have their glasses on will be able to tell if "this person is a nurse" when the person gets close to the patient.
    Except our badges flip over...all the time...UGH.

  • Oct 23

    We had one doc that loved to have dramatic temper tantrums. Throwing charts, pens and flopping down in a chair throwing his arms up in the air.

    One day doc was having a whopper of a tantrum. The chart went sliding down the station floor, a pen went whizzing past someones head. The dr the flung himself in a chair. Guess what? As he sat down, the chair, with wheels, moved. Doc hit the ground hard, lol. Sort of put a damper on his drama.

    The rest of us scattered like mice, snickering down the hall, and left him sitting there.

  • Oct 7
  • Oct 7

    Quote from jmira
    I am currently in an ADN program and the plan is to go for BSN straight after. I think that BSN is an excellent idea for the future of nursing in regards to the aging population and with the baby boomers starting to hit retirement this year. Theres been countless RN related patient deaths these past few years and it disgusts me. I personally had a 20 yr old friend in the hospital recovering from pneumonia set to be released the next day. The ignorant RN mistakenly double dosed him on pain killers and ambien and cost him his life. He was an only child. I feel that if only a single accidental RN related death may be avoided by this change then thats good enough. The quality of healthcare MUST improve and this is a good step towards it.
    How long this change is going to take to go into effect, who knows? This talk has been going on for years, but I do feel bad for the many excellent ADN RNs who may be affected
    What kills patients are poorly staffed hospitals and overworked nurses. I just lost my stepfather due to an overworked nurse. She had a six patient load and he needed to be monitored more closely.
    When you under staff a hospital, nurses make mistakes and sentinel events happen.

  • Oct 4

    We scan our meds and our charting is computerized. It documents when we pass meds and do notes, so no hiding anything.

  • Oct 1

    Oh, as mentioned before, there are many instructors that are very good. What you need to do is get on the forum before it opens. First day is Friday with classes starting on Monday. Read the announcements and see if the instructor is a good fit for you. If not, post nothing on Monday, call your advisor and get switched.


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