Content That CrazyGoonRN Likes

Content That CrazyGoonRN Likes

CrazyGoonRN 8,764 Views

Joined Aug 14, '09. Posts: 419 (30% Liked) Likes: 320

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  • Apr 7

    Quote from Extra Pickles
    Why does your husband drive you to work appointments? You don't drive? I read your post and thought it was a little controlling on your husbands part but I didn't say anything because maybe it's too judgmental and not my business. But now you're saying he also drives you to jobs? Do you go anywhere by yourself?
    That was just an example. I normally drive myself, but - occasionally - we are down to one car and have to share rides. Even so, we are careful to keep within HIPPA. We don't share rides often, as I normally work nights and he works days.

  • Apr 7

    Quote from Extra Pickles
    Why does your husband drive you to work appointments? You don't drive? I read your post and thought it was a little controlling on your husbands part but I didn't say anything because maybe it's too judgmental and not my business. But now you're saying he also drives you to jobs? Do you go anywhere by yourself?
    I think she was saying that as an example. I had a job exactly like this and my car broke down and I had to have a ride for a few days until I could get it into the shop and I had to have the client's permission before I could do it. I had a supervisor tell me a story about how she accidentally locked her keys in her car at a client's house and had to have her husband bring her her spare set and she couldn't give out the client's address without permission and had to meet him a block down the road.

  • Apr 7

    Yeah... I don't think he's being controlling. I think he just doesn't want her to get in trouble at work. Which is understandable! My boyfriend is the same way. He's always like... I'm not gonna get you in trouble right?! I would just assure him that no... you will not get in trouble and that you will be careful. The bad thing about social media is that it can come back to bite you in the butt professionally, so you have to be mindful about what you share. Maybe he would feel better if you let him read a few of your posts before you post them and explain how its okay to post. Some people just need to be reassured.

  • Apr 7

    My husband is concerned that I could say too much; he is definitely the more cautious of the two of us. We are close, we discuss issues easily, and we look out for each other. I never meant to imply that he ordered me around.

    My agencies are fairly strict. I can't even have my husband drive me to work unless I have the client's permission. He's not supposed to know where they live. I'm vague in my descriptions. "I'm going north of (this city)", or, "It's in town." I don't do HIPPA violations.

    It's good to know that others have also had to work out a balance between spouses and the ALLNURSES crowd.

    Thanks for the responses.

  • Apr 7

    Quote from Pepper The Cat
    Your husband won't "let you". ??!
    seriously??!!
    i'm sorry, but I really don't understand this.
    You are a grown adult and should be able to participate anywhere anyplace you want.
    controlling much???
    Kitiger didn't say that her husband wouldn't let her. She said her husband didn't want her on AN. A spouse can certainly express an opinion without being controlling.

    You won't always agree with your life partner, but you are wise to at least listen to their concerns and consider if what they say has merit. Your spouse should show you the same courtesy.

  • Mar 27
  • Mar 27

    You might want to re-think identfying your previous employer, there might never be any repercussions, but the nursing world is smaller than you think, sometimes past managers get hired at current workplaces and it can be awkward.

  • Mar 25

    Quote from HouTx
    Were you doing home care in a high-crime area? Providing care to violent, psychotic patients? Threatened by co-workers? Exposed to chemical toxins? Dealing with sub-standard or faulty equipment? I am really curious about the 'danger' element also. Could be totally legit.
    High crime, yes. High violence, yes. I have been attacked and punched. Threatened, no, thank God. Chemical toxins, yes. Sub standard/ faulty equipment, yes, we ran out of gloves for a week and I had to work with bodily fluids without gloves, even though I sent multiple emails and warned everyone that we were low on gloves several times.

  • Mar 10

    I am quite unsure of the context on a few of the responses, mostly by yhthr. The context of his/her posts seems rather difficult to follow and am I not sure of the point he/she is trying to provide. I do not really get involved much in the NP/PA/MD/DO etc debate. I do not feel we will lose any or much ground if that is what many of my counterparts are worried about. But back on topic, it does seem that many of the nurse practitioner programs do not offer a few of the rudimentary skills that psychguy describes. This probably does vary greatly, but it does answer my question. At least now I will know what to expect and will be wary on many new graduate nurse practitioners and attempt to give them the guidance they may need when they are pulling shifts in the ER. As others agree with, the problem of overconfidence does spam all professions, and I think I stated that earlier on to show my impartiality toward the topic. As previously stated there are great providers out there of all sort, but when it comes down to pulling teeth, it is very difficult to be prepared for any provider role in 700 hours or so. I also do agree that much nursing experience prior to does help. Often times the ER nurses at the facilities already have everything done before one of us provider type enter the room. And many of them are almost always correct on what to do and many could probably run the ER if needed.
    I know most people also know that there are many doctors that are rather “not excellent” in a way to put it and often not motivated. This is very true, but the major difference is to be able to make it through medical school and residency without sinking into a subpar depressive state, is one must enjoy what he/she is doing. By forcing us through the tens of thousands of hours of residency, they are able to pound the needed information so thoroughly into our brains that even the least motivated physician will have the needed background to perform decently. The lack of motivation would provider a larger detriment toward the pa or np who has not been forced through this ringer quite as long and where each hour must be cherished to maximize knowledge gained.
    The self-motivated will always come out on top, and again, the self motivated nurse practitioners are excellent, and can do almost all of what we can do within a year or two of practice and mentoring. But it is somewhat concerning that one can come out prescribing thousands of different medications without the solid knowledge of what most of these chemicals do to the body.
    All in all, with the experience you all have described it seems once a motivated nurse practitioner gains footing there is nothing to worry about, if they are motivated. The general consensus seems to be that (again) education is very school specific, some are good, some are not so good (the online schooling part is rather terrifying). I am simply attempting to sum up what I have read so please excuse me if my response does not flow perfectly, but by putting it in my own words it allows me to understand it better and also portray my train of thought to you all, since we are all hopefully on the same team, at least theoretically.

  • Mar 10
  • Feb 23

    I love the idea of selling nursing supplies. Do you have any idea on how and where to get them.

  • Feb 23

    My solution has always been to ignore that stupid rule, except when Joint Commission is expected. One can quickly hide a drink or food item behind a computer monitor if necessary.

  • Jan 29

    Something like a patient coding and you know nothing about them, not even if they are a DNR/DNI because you barely knew they were coming, let alone have time to look them up on the system. Electronic reports give only a small picture about what is going on. A verbal report can fill in the necessary gaps. I worked at a place where they faxed an SBAR report. These had similar drawbacks.

  • Jan 29

    Quote from emtb2rn
    "This is emtb2rn. The pt is a 53 y/o male, history of htn & cholesterol. Intermittent sternal chest pain x3 days. No pain the er, rsr, got 324 of aspirin, trop negative, 20 gauge in one of his arms, serial trops and stress test in the am, transport without tele." How do i in the ed leave that taped for the floor? We put it on the faxed sbar.
    How does the receiving nurse ask a question of a faxed piece of paper?

  • Jan 29

    Quote from springchick1
    She had a car. Her problem was she didn't plan ahead knowing a massive blizzard was coming.
    Allow me to address your snippet response.

    First, in all the years I have been with the hospital, do you know how many times I have missed for snow?

    ZERO. In fact, I usually go in for others that are not there. So before you claim I don't prepare I absolutely do.

    I guess you missed the part where my vehicle slid off the driveway into the yard.

    I called a tow to get me out. They said that they were so backed up that unless it was on a road or someone was inside they would not come.

    I don't work in the city I live in. The snow came in two waves...the first wave already came, the second that was supposed to hit here did not come on the day it was supposed to. I was off that day the snow came where I worked. We got snow TWO DAYS prior to my scheduled shift to the tune of about 6 inches. That's a large fall where I live.

    The day before my shift do you know how much snow we received? NONE.

    The day of my shift we were supposed to only get 2 additional inches. We ended up getting 10. The roads were clear enough. Even the radar that I pulled up throughout the night did now show we were getting that much.

    So would you travel to a hotel two days in advance, pay for two nights at roughly $80 a night in my area, for two inches of predicted snow (the large snowfall had already hit and roads scraped). No, you would not. Two inches is no big deal.

    You can drive on scraped roads if you go slow. You cannot drive in 10 inches of freshly fallen snow. I also live in a mountainous area. You can't even get up an incline when it's like that.

    It takes me 45 minutes to get to work. I got up in time to allow for 90 minutes for me to get there.

    My point is that some nurses do try and get there and cannot besides all efforts. I even called a tow truck that refused to come!!! I can only go by the weather report. I got gas in advance and had my car swept off to make sure it would not freeze.

    Short of bringing a magic wand and pixie dust I don't know what else I could have done.


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