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CrazyGoonRN 11,105 Views

Joined Aug 14, '09. Posts: 439 (30% Liked) Likes: 346

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  • Apr 5

    My nursing school journey: I applied and didn't get into a BSN program several years ago. A few weeks after I was rejected I applied and got into an LPN program. After graduating LPN school I applied to a LPN-RN program and didn't get in. Later that year I applied to a LPN-BSN program and I got in. :-) I am now am RN. I say keep trying if you don't get in the first time. That's what I did and I'm exactly where I want to be today.

    Retake whatever class you need to in order to get your GPA up. Do what ever you can to help you get I. :-) don't give up!!!

  • Mar 11

    Quote from terra105
    Hi everyone! Im new on here and I'd like to thank everyone in advance for their responses. I've spent hours upon hours reading disscussions on here and I'm very grateful that this site exists.

    Here's my dilemma...

    I already have my bachelor's in something unrelated to nursing and I want to go back to school to become either a nurse or a physicians assistant. I'd like to get some experience in the medical field fairly quick and I'm not sure if I should become an LPN first. I have to take pretty much the same prereqs to get into either the RN or PA program and I have lots to take before I can apply to either program. I was thinking that I could go to LPN school, continue to take my prereqs, get a job in the field, then decide if I want to become an RN or PA and go from there. Is this wise to do? Please help!

    Thank you everyone!


    Well that is what I did. I have my BA in Political Science. At first I decided to return to school to get my BSN. I took all my pre-req's and applied to nursing school, but was put on a waiting list. I was very disappointed. A week later I found out about a new LPN program that was starting in my hometown. I really didn't want to go that route but I figured it would get me to my goal faster than sitting around and waiting to re-apply to the RN program.
    So I applied and got in :-) A week into the LPN program I got a call from the RN program saying that they had several students drop out and I was offered a spot. They told me to think about it until 4pm that day and after that they were calling the next person on the list. I was excited that I got in but the more I thought about it, I didn't want to wait that long to be a nurse. I could be an LPN in 1 year, but wouldn't be an RN for 2 1/2 more years. I also didn't think I could wait that long to get a job becuase I was running low on money. So I turned it down.

    The LPN program was a grueling, 5 day a week program and it was tough. It was not unusual to go over several chapters one day and have the test on them the next day. I really had to make time to study, some people in my class didn't make it. It required a 80 average in every subject or you fail. It was 3 semesters. The last 2 semesters we were in clinicals 3 days a week and in the classroom 2 days. An LPN program is 75% clinicals and 25% theory, but an RN program is 75% theory and 25% clinicals. So an LPN program will give you a lot of clinical experience, which was very good for me becuase I have bad anxiety and get really nervous in situations where I am performing and being watched. So all the clinical experience has lessened my anxiety and I no longer have to take a pill to calm me down when going into new clinical/work situations. All the experience gave me confidence.

    I just graduated my LPN program in Dec 2010 and passed the NCLEX-PN. I am on the job search and have already applied to a LPN-RN program that starts this summer. If you go through an LPN program then you will definatly know with out a doubt wether or not you want to be an RN, but remember LPN programs are tough and require a lot of your time and energy. I have had several RN's tell me that they don't think they could have done an LPN program. It's because you don't have the time to study and prepare for things like you do in an RN program. I am not saying that LPN is harder. I guess the hard thing is not having much time to do things.

    Good luck to you! I am sure you will make the right decision for you :-)

  • Mar 4

    No absolutly not. If a patient is too hemodynamically unstable for hemodialysis and requiring CVVHD then I do not see it being safe to get them out of bed. Sounds like the higher up's are out of touch with reality.

  • Mar 2

    Call the general hospital number and ask who ever answers what it stands for.

  • Feb 5

    Quote from FutureNurseDanielle
    OMG!! That story was such an inspiration!!!!! I am a pre-nursing student who is trying to get into the RN program at my school and its very competitive and although i am not weak, at times I second guess myself because all the nursing students say its really hard. I have a 1 year old son and im a teen mother. Ive been called every name in the book by so called friends because of being a teen mother and they dont expect for me to succeed in nursing! But after listening to your story about how you had the strength, motivation, determination, and drive to still give it your BEST shot while you were severely sick, motivates me so much to get off my ass and get my mind right! I have no reason to doubt myself. and i have no excuses to failing! You truly touched me! I will never forget this story!
    One of my classmates in nursing school was a single mother of 2 children under age 5. The father was not in the picture and she got no child support. Her family did not offer much support either. She would come to class exhausted having only slept 1 or 2 hours the night before because of her kids being sick or just up all night. She was committed to making a better life for herself and her kids and never quit. On days that she had to be in clinicals at 6:45am she asked her family to take her kids to daycare so she could make it to the hospital on time, but they refused. Her daycare did not open until 6am and she did not have time to get to clinicals on time. She talked to the daycare and one of the teachers offered to get there 15 min early so that she would not be late to clinicals. Her kids are lucky to have such a devoted mother. She worked hard and is now an LPN making pretty good money. She is committed to return to school and become an RN, and I believe she will do it. Work hard, don't give up and you can do it too

  • Jan 2

    I had a pt's daughter call late at night. She repeatedly dropped her phone and I listened to her shooing her dog away while she searched for the phone. She rambled on and on about how her mom loves it when people joke with her, therefore I as her nurse should "flick her in the nose" and joke around with her when speaking with her.

    It was the strangest conversation I've ever had with a family member.

  • Jan 1

    I worked LTC/SNF for 3 years. When I started in med/Surg there were a lot of new things to learn, but I was no where as busy as I was at the LTC/SNF.

  • Dec 22 '16

    Quote from FutureNurseDanielle
    OMG!! That story was such an inspiration!!!!! I am a pre-nursing student who is trying to get into the RN program at my school and its very competitive and although i am not weak, at times I second guess myself because all the nursing students say its really hard. I have a 1 year old son and im a teen mother. Ive been called every name in the book by so called friends because of being a teen mother and they dont expect for me to succeed in nursing! But after listening to your story about how you had the strength, motivation, determination, and drive to still give it your BEST shot while you were severely sick, motivates me so much to get off my ass and get my mind right! I have no reason to doubt myself. and i have no excuses to failing! You truly touched me! I will never forget this story!
    One of my classmates in nursing school was a single mother of 2 children under age 5. The father was not in the picture and she got no child support. Her family did not offer much support either. She would come to class exhausted having only slept 1 or 2 hours the night before because of her kids being sick or just up all night. She was committed to making a better life for herself and her kids and never quit. On days that she had to be in clinicals at 6:45am she asked her family to take her kids to daycare so she could make it to the hospital on time, but they refused. Her daycare did not open until 6am and she did not have time to get to clinicals on time. She talked to the daycare and one of the teachers offered to get there 15 min early so that she would not be late to clinicals. Her kids are lucky to have such a devoted mother. She worked hard and is now an LPN making pretty good money. She is committed to return to school and become an RN, and I believe she will do it. Work hard, don't give up and you can do it too

  • Nov 1 '16

    Centennial medical center is the highest paying hospital in Nashville. It is an HCA hospital. There are three HCA hospitals in Nashville (skyline MC , Southern Hills MC , and centennial ). Vanderbilt medical center is an excellent place to work and the only magnet hospital, level 1 trauma, but the pay is not as good. St. Thomas Midtown and St. Thomas West are also good places to work, but a friend of mine who works at one of those hospital said they have cut back their benefits. I have lived in Nashville area my entire life, and Vanderbilt and Centennial are the top two hospitals in the area.

  • Sep 27 '16

    One tip I learned from a seasoned nurse: Go ahead measure and pour all your Miralax powder before you start passing meds. Then just stack the cups inside each other. If you know that you will have 8 pts taking mirilax then you dont have to waste time pouring. Just grab a cup and fill with water/gatorade. :-)

  • Sep 27 '16

    Quote from tyvin
    Isn't that considered pre-pouring? What's the difference if you have a bunch of ativan in one wing or everyone takes the house multivitamin ... could you stack em up?
    Yeah it probably is considered pre pouring but it makes things a lot quicker. There is no need to be so dramatic. I never pre pour pills. Especially narcs!! There is a difference.

  • Sep 27 '16

    One tip I learned from a seasoned nurse: Go ahead measure and pour all your Miralax powder before you start passing meds. Then just stack the cups inside each other. If you know that you will have 8 pts taking mirilax then you dont have to waste time pouring. Just grab a cup and fill with water/gatorade. :-)

  • Sep 25 '16

    It depends on how long you are committed to go to school and your money and living situation. However, you will have many more opportunities as an RN.

    I went through a full time LPN program that lasted 1 year. It was intense because everything is compressed. It was 5 days a week. It was hard for many students in the class to continue working at their other jobs once we were about 6 months into the program. It was tough because we would go over information and often be tested on it a few days later. It also required an 80 or above. Below an 80 was considered failing.

    I later went through a LPN-BSN program. Compared to the LPN program, in the BSN program we dug deeper into every subject and had more time to learn it. I learned a tremendous amount of information in my BSN program that was never mentioned in the LPN program. Going through a Associates or Bachelor's degree program is a big committment that lasts several years. Also, if I want to go on to grad school I can go anytime with my BSN.

    I am glad that I became an LPN then later an RN. However, I always wanted to work in a hospital with really sick patients. That is something I could never do as an LPN.

    What do you want to do as a nurse?

    As an LPN your opportunities are limited and the pay is less.

    As an RN your opportunites are endless and the pay is better.

  • Sep 23 '16

    It depends on how long you are committed to go to school and your money and living situation. However, you will have many more opportunities as an RN.

    I went through a full time LPN program that lasted 1 year. It was intense because everything is compressed. It was 5 days a week. It was hard for many students in the class to continue working at their other jobs once we were about 6 months into the program. It was tough because we would go over information and often be tested on it a few days later. It also required an 80 or above. Below an 80 was considered failing.

    I later went through a LPN-BSN program. Compared to the LPN program, in the BSN program we dug deeper into every subject and had more time to learn it. I learned a tremendous amount of information in my BSN program that was never mentioned in the LPN program. Going through a Associates or Bachelor's degree program is a big committment that lasts several years. Also, if I want to go on to grad school I can go anytime with my BSN.

    I am glad that I became an LPN then later an RN. However, I always wanted to work in a hospital with really sick patients. That is something I could never do as an LPN.

    What do you want to do as a nurse?

    As an LPN your opportunities are limited and the pay is less.

    As an RN your opportunites are endless and the pay is better.

  • Sep 22 '16

    It depends on how long you are committed to go to school and your money and living situation. However, you will have many more opportunities as an RN.

    I went through a full time LPN program that lasted 1 year. It was intense because everything is compressed. It was 5 days a week. It was hard for many students in the class to continue working at their other jobs once we were about 6 months into the program. It was tough because we would go over information and often be tested on it a few days later. It also required an 80 or above. Below an 80 was considered failing.

    I later went through a LPN-BSN program. Compared to the LPN program, in the BSN program we dug deeper into every subject and had more time to learn it. I learned a tremendous amount of information in my BSN program that was never mentioned in the LPN program. Going through a Associates or Bachelor's degree program is a big committment that lasts several years. Also, if I want to go on to grad school I can go anytime with my BSN.

    I am glad that I became an LPN then later an RN. However, I always wanted to work in a hospital with really sick patients. That is something I could never do as an LPN.

    What do you want to do as a nurse?

    As an LPN your opportunities are limited and the pay is less.

    As an RN your opportunites are endless and the pay is better.


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