Latest Likes For CrazyGoonRN

Latest Likes For CrazyGoonRN

CrazyGoonRN 9,884 Views

Joined Aug 14, '09. Posts: 427 (30% Liked) Likes: 337

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  • Sep 27

    One tip I learned from a seasoned nurse: Go ahead measure and pour all your Miralax powder before you start passing meds. Then just stack the cups inside each other. If you know that you will have 8 pts taking mirilax then you dont have to waste time pouring. Just grab a cup and fill with water/gatorade. :-)

  • Sep 27

    Quote from tyvin
    Isn't that considered pre-pouring? What's the difference if you have a bunch of ativan in one wing or everyone takes the house multivitamin ... could you stack em up?
    Yeah it probably is considered pre pouring but it makes things a lot quicker. There is no need to be so dramatic. I never pre pour pills. Especially narcs!! There is a difference.

  • Sep 27

    One tip I learned from a seasoned nurse: Go ahead measure and pour all your Miralax powder before you start passing meds. Then just stack the cups inside each other. If you know that you will have 8 pts taking mirilax then you dont have to waste time pouring. Just grab a cup and fill with water/gatorade. :-)

  • Sep 25

    It depends on how long you are committed to go to school and your money and living situation. However, you will have many more opportunities as an RN.

    I went through a full time LPN program that lasted 1 year. It was intense because everything is compressed. It was 5 days a week. It was hard for many students in the class to continue working at their other jobs once we were about 6 months into the program. It was tough because we would go over information and often be tested on it a few days later. It also required an 80 or above. Below an 80 was considered failing.

    I later went through a LPN-BSN program. Compared to the LPN program, in the BSN program we dug deeper into every subject and had more time to learn it. I learned a tremendous amount of information in my BSN program that was never mentioned in the LPN program. Going through a Associates or Bachelor's degree program is a big committment that lasts several years. Also, if I want to go on to grad school I can go anytime with my BSN.

    I am glad that I became an LPN then later an RN. However, I always wanted to work in a hospital with really sick patients. That is something I could never do as an LPN.

    What do you want to do as a nurse?

    As an LPN your opportunities are limited and the pay is less.

    As an RN your opportunites are endless and the pay is better.

  • Sep 23

    It depends on how long you are committed to go to school and your money and living situation. However, you will have many more opportunities as an RN.

    I went through a full time LPN program that lasted 1 year. It was intense because everything is compressed. It was 5 days a week. It was hard for many students in the class to continue working at their other jobs once we were about 6 months into the program. It was tough because we would go over information and often be tested on it a few days later. It also required an 80 or above. Below an 80 was considered failing.

    I later went through a LPN-BSN program. Compared to the LPN program, in the BSN program we dug deeper into every subject and had more time to learn it. I learned a tremendous amount of information in my BSN program that was never mentioned in the LPN program. Going through a Associates or Bachelor's degree program is a big committment that lasts several years. Also, if I want to go on to grad school I can go anytime with my BSN.

    I am glad that I became an LPN then later an RN. However, I always wanted to work in a hospital with really sick patients. That is something I could never do as an LPN.

    What do you want to do as a nurse?

    As an LPN your opportunities are limited and the pay is less.

    As an RN your opportunites are endless and the pay is better.

  • Sep 22

    It depends on how long you are committed to go to school and your money and living situation. However, you will have many more opportunities as an RN.

    I went through a full time LPN program that lasted 1 year. It was intense because everything is compressed. It was 5 days a week. It was hard for many students in the class to continue working at their other jobs once we were about 6 months into the program. It was tough because we would go over information and often be tested on it a few days later. It also required an 80 or above. Below an 80 was considered failing.

    I later went through a LPN-BSN program. Compared to the LPN program, in the BSN program we dug deeper into every subject and had more time to learn it. I learned a tremendous amount of information in my BSN program that was never mentioned in the LPN program. Going through a Associates or Bachelor's degree program is a big committment that lasts several years. Also, if I want to go on to grad school I can go anytime with my BSN.

    I am glad that I became an LPN then later an RN. However, I always wanted to work in a hospital with really sick patients. That is something I could never do as an LPN.

    What do you want to do as a nurse?

    As an LPN your opportunities are limited and the pay is less.

    As an RN your opportunites are endless and the pay is better.

  • Sep 21

    It depends on how long you are committed to go to school and your money and living situation. However, you will have many more opportunities as an RN.

    I went through a full time LPN program that lasted 1 year. It was intense because everything is compressed. It was 5 days a week. It was hard for many students in the class to continue working at their other jobs once we were about 6 months into the program. It was tough because we would go over information and often be tested on it a few days later. It also required an 80 or above. Below an 80 was considered failing.

    I later went through a LPN-BSN program. Compared to the LPN program, in the BSN program we dug deeper into every subject and had more time to learn it. I learned a tremendous amount of information in my BSN program that was never mentioned in the LPN program. Going through a Associates or Bachelor's degree program is a big committment that lasts several years. Also, if I want to go on to grad school I can go anytime with my BSN.

    I am glad that I became an LPN then later an RN. However, I always wanted to work in a hospital with really sick patients. That is something I could never do as an LPN.

    What do you want to do as a nurse?

    As an LPN your opportunities are limited and the pay is less.

    As an RN your opportunites are endless and the pay is better.

  • Sep 19

    It depends on how long you are committed to go to school and your money and living situation. However, you will have many more opportunities as an RN.

    I went through a full time LPN program that lasted 1 year. It was intense because everything is compressed. It was 5 days a week. It was hard for many students in the class to continue working at their other jobs once we were about 6 months into the program. It was tough because we would go over information and often be tested on it a few days later. It also required an 80 or above. Below an 80 was considered failing.

    I later went through a LPN-BSN program. Compared to the LPN program, in the BSN program we dug deeper into every subject and had more time to learn it. I learned a tremendous amount of information in my BSN program that was never mentioned in the LPN program. Going through a Associates or Bachelor's degree program is a big committment that lasts several years. Also, if I want to go on to grad school I can go anytime with my BSN.

    I am glad that I became an LPN then later an RN. However, I always wanted to work in a hospital with really sick patients. That is something I could never do as an LPN.

    What do you want to do as a nurse?

    As an LPN your opportunities are limited and the pay is less.

    As an RN your opportunites are endless and the pay is better.

  • Sep 18

    It depends on how long you are committed to go to school and your money and living situation. However, you will have many more opportunities as an RN.

    I went through a full time LPN program that lasted 1 year. It was intense because everything is compressed. It was 5 days a week. It was hard for many students in the class to continue working at their other jobs once we were about 6 months into the program. It was tough because we would go over information and often be tested on it a few days later. It also required an 80 or above. Below an 80 was considered failing.

    I later went through a LPN-BSN program. Compared to the LPN program, in the BSN program we dug deeper into every subject and had more time to learn it. I learned a tremendous amount of information in my BSN program that was never mentioned in the LPN program. Going through a Associates or Bachelor's degree program is a big committment that lasts several years. Also, if I want to go on to grad school I can go anytime with my BSN.

    I am glad that I became an LPN then later an RN. However, I always wanted to work in a hospital with really sick patients. That is something I could never do as an LPN.

    What do you want to do as a nurse?

    As an LPN your opportunities are limited and the pay is less.

    As an RN your opportunites are endless and the pay is better.

  • Sep 18

    It depends on how long you are committed to go to school and your money and living situation. However, you will have many more opportunities as an RN.

    I went through a full time LPN program that lasted 1 year. It was intense because everything is compressed. It was 5 days a week. It was hard for many students in the class to continue working at their other jobs once we were about 6 months into the program. It was tough because we would go over information and often be tested on it a few days later. It also required an 80 or above. Below an 80 was considered failing.

    I later went through a LPN-BSN program. Compared to the LPN program, in the BSN program we dug deeper into every subject and had more time to learn it. I learned a tremendous amount of information in my BSN program that was never mentioned in the LPN program. Going through a Associates or Bachelor's degree program is a big committment that lasts several years. Also, if I want to go on to grad school I can go anytime with my BSN.

    I am glad that I became an LPN then later an RN. However, I always wanted to work in a hospital with really sick patients. That is something I could never do as an LPN.

    What do you want to do as a nurse?

    As an LPN your opportunities are limited and the pay is less.

    As an RN your opportunites are endless and the pay is better.

  • Jul 12
  • Jun 30

    My nursing school journey: I applied and didn't get into a BSN program several years ago. A few weeks after I was rejected I applied and got into an LPN program. After graduating LPN school I applied to a LPN-RN program and didn't get in. Later that year I applied to a LPN-BSN program and I got in. :-) I am now am RN. I say keep trying if you don't get in the first time. That's what I did and I'm exactly where I want to be today.

    Retake whatever class you need to in order to get your GPA up. Do what ever you can to help you get I. :-) don't give up!!!

  • Jun 9

    Quote from tyvin
    Isn't that considered pre-pouring? What's the difference if you have a bunch of ativan in one wing or everyone takes the house multivitamin ... could you stack em up?
    Yeah it probably is considered pre pouring but it makes things a lot quicker. There is no need to be so dramatic. I never pre pour pills. Especially narcs!! There is a difference.

  • Jun 6

    My LPN experience was factored in and I received a higher starting hourly wage but I was still treated like every other new grad. However, my LPN background was in LTC. If I had acute care experience I don't know if it would have been different.

  • May 10

    Yes. One of my fellow nursing school grads did exactly that. She failed the LPN program at one school by 1 or 2 points then the next year went back at another school and passed and is now an LPN. She didn't give up, because she was determined to be a nurse. Another one of my fellow grads failed an RN program then a couple years later entered an LPN program and passed. I am not sure if she is planning on continuing on to another RN program or not. You can do it!


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