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tewdles 22,103 Views

Joined Jul 10, '09. Posts: 4,880 (60% Liked) Likes: 8,274

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  • Nov 29

    I wonder...

    I love being a Christian..
    I love being a wife.
    I love being a mother.
    I love being a nurse.

    All of those things exist in my life simultaneously. All of those things impact my practice and expression of each of those other things. My job is to keep the proper balances in my life where those things rub together.

  • Nov 29

    In my experience it has more to do with how you decline their offer of employment than other issues.

  • Nov 27

    Quote from deann52
    She did not have "dispoable income" as a CNA. She was getting handouts from the govenment. Now she has a job that gives her enough to pay her own bills so I don't have too. Sorry, but that whole paragraph with the income breakdown is a big fat welcome to the real world and grow up.
    Sounds to me that a CNA going to school to improve her circumstance is not getting a handout but rather a handup.

    It is sad for me the number of otherwise well meaning Americans who despise people for needing help. I think that very few of us do well in life when we are truly on our own. Not everyone comes from a family or social situation that can provide assistance for financial needs...they can't afford to subsidize college, or rent, or food, or transportation for their children. That doesn't make them less American or less valuable than the child born with the silver spoon. Mitt Romney, for example, is no more valuable to the USA because he was born wealthy and has never received welfare as compared to the young man or woman who receives support while getting an education or working toward personal goals which will improve their social status.

    In my view, this "class warfare" is destructive to our society.

  • Nov 25

    Being sensitive to the spiritual needs of the patient...yes required.
    Having a spiritual or religious faith yourself...no, not required.

  • Nov 17

    Our agency encourages the nurses (and other disciplines) to attend the visitations. One of the things that is troubling to families is the fact that their loved one dies and at the same time they lose all contact with the team that they bonded with. Visitation attendance helps both the family and the staff to experience "closure" of that relationship with less time requirement and social pressure for the hospice professionals.

  • Nov 4

    I am dismayed that the nurse who had a legal medical marijuana card was not hired because of it...
    Would that also have been true if the nurse had tested postive for ativan or some other med for which he/she had an RX?
    Like the other medications included on the drug screens, marijuana actually has proven medical benefit for some people in some circumstances, often with fewer side effects than other more "traditional" medications.

    so sad...

  • Oct 31

    The Edmonton scores can be helpful. It's nice when staff get oriented to their use.

  • Oct 21

    Hopefully your faith will inform and enrich your nursing practice.
    Nurses do not proselytize.
    Most employers will fire you if they believe you are engaged in that type of religious activity.
    Dying atheists have a right to die without God.
    Dying Buddhists don't need to hear about Jesus from their nurse.
    Dying Muslims may want you to read their Quran to them.
    etc, etc, etc

  • Oct 20

    Being sensitive to the spiritual needs of the patient...yes required.
    Having a spiritual or religious faith yourself...no, not required.

  • Sep 29

    Our agency encourages the nurses (and other disciplines) to attend the visitations. One of the things that is troubling to families is the fact that their loved one dies and at the same time they lose all contact with the team that they bonded with. Visitation attendance helps both the family and the staff to experience "closure" of that relationship with less time requirement and social pressure for the hospice professionals.

  • Sep 24
    From heron In No dnr

    In Ohio, Michigan, and Alaska there is no "presumed" DNR. They either have legal DNR documentation or they do not. DNR status is not required for hospice services. Hospice does not force people to sign DNR paperwork.

    If the patient is a full code we start CPR when appropriate.

  • Sep 9

    I cared for a patient who also had "beings' present that a child could see as sparklies in the air. For a few days they were with the child, particularly at night and the day that grandma died the child saw them near the ceiling over her bed.

    The child was not frightened by these sparkly "things" in the least.

    I believe that just as God stood with Paul when he feared for his life, He is with us as we transition to the next big adventure...Emmanuel.

  • Aug 11

    First, I wish so much goodness in your life and career that you wake amazed at your life everyday!

    Second, I have been a hospice nurse for a nice little spell now and I love it terribly. Because I love it so much I am willing to make not as much as I am worth as a nursing professional.

    What you will make will depend entirely upon the average rates in your region and whether you work for large vs small and profit vs not for profit.

  • Aug 6

    Please do not blame the patients for the health system that they must use and DID NOT CREATE.

  • Aug 5

    I am dismayed that the nurse who had a legal medical marijuana card was not hired because of it...
    Would that also have been true if the nurse had tested postive for ativan or some other med for which he/she had an RX?
    Like the other medications included on the drug screens, marijuana actually has proven medical benefit for some people in some circumstances, often with fewer side effects than other more "traditional" medications.

    so sad...


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