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tewdles 29,747 Views

Joined: Jul 10, '09; Posts: 4,871 (60% Liked) ; Likes: 8,292

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  • May 14

    I agree with you Viva...it doesn't work to use this drug recreationally if you are a nurse...drink alcohol instead.

    It is truly unfortunate that there remains so much misinformation about marijuana as a medication that provides significant benefit to people. It seems that too many nursing professionals may just see them as "pot heads".

  • May 12

    i cannot stand to hear someone utter the words "fighting cancer."


    perhaps the way you opened your comments was part of the misunderstanding. you don't see it as a fight ("cancer is not a game, a contest, a marathon, or even a physical opponent. you cannot ball up your fist and knock it out, you cannot will it away, or will yourself into remission.") but many of us do see and experience it as a fight. it does seem to be a marathon at times and, although cancer itself is decidely not a game, the victims of cancer are often victims of chance which is an element of games.

    yes, some patients do exhibit amazing strength and grace in the face of a possibly terminal disease.

    i know that this amazing strength and grace is often the fruit of a significant struggle or contest.

    she did not lose a fight. cancer did not beat her. she did not fail at wanting to live badly enough.

    so, for the cancer victim...yes the cancer beat her and she did lose that fight. that was what my 38 year old friend told me (in so many words) when she was planning her funeral and trying make arrangements for the futures of her 10 and 13 yr old children. i sat with her as a breast cancer survivor (age 38) and she sat with me as a young woman dying from the same disease. the fights that she didn't lose were perhaps less obvious...the fight to keep positive for her children, to make those recordings for her daughter's graduation and wedding days, to support her husband and mother as they considered how they would ever continue without her.

    you see this as well...the legacy, the "impression" that we leave behind which you mentioned. i would encourage you to consider that it is not always easy to leave that positive impression when faced with your own mortality. my friend saw this as a battle and she was magnificent in her warfare...courageous, strong, unwilling to give up, inspite of the odds and opponents. her children benefit today from her fight on that field those years back.

    even paul equated the struggles of a faithful christian life to a "fight" and spoke of a "crown of victory".

    as for who do i want at my bedside when i am dying...i want the nurse who understands my goals, who is interested in what i need to be comfortable on a physical, emotional, and spiritual level. i want the nurse who allows me to fight or to faint according to my needs. the nurse who on tuesday can be my cheerleader in the game and on wednesday can hold my hand while i cry...then back to the battlefield on thursday. i do not want the nurse who cannot see that cancer is not one battle or fight...it is many and not all of them are lost when and because the patient dies.

    i do not doubt that you have compassion for your patients. please be careful with your difficulty with the concept of "fighting cancer"...your patients and families may very well not understand your dislike of that phrase and, frankly, they shouldn't have to.

    ps...i am surprised by carrid's comment that "there are no atheists on an oncology unit"...cuz there are plenty in hospice...atheists die from cancer just like muslims, jews, and pagans.

  • Apr 25

    I was told when I moved to Fairbanks that Fairbanksans don't want their community to get too big. So I am supposed to tell everyone that it is too dark, too cold, and there is too much snow so they should stay in the lower 48.

    Other than that, I would highly recommend it. AK is a beautiful state and has lots of opportunity. AK has not been as troubled by the recession as the lower 48 have been. There are no dumb people in AK, they freeze along the road in the winter.

    Okay, that last comment was a bad joke, I will admit...and there is the matter of their recent Governor that would beg argument on the point anyway.

  • Apr 19

    Yes, the drive by thing is a good idea...I did a drive by once at night and drove right into a group of young people who were having a bad disagreement, seconds later I heard gunshots and called the police. I was a few minutes late to my appointent, but I was safe.

  • Apr 19

    Don't get out of the car and then reach back into the vehicle or the trunk. Assemble your stuff before you get their so that your focus on arrival is your environment, not your gear.

    If you will frequent potentially dangerous areas I would consider a personal safety class. They increase your awareness and give you more options.

    I survived providing home hospice and SN care in metro Detroit...the families and their peeps look out for you.

  • Apr 9

    i cannot stand to hear someone utter the words "fighting cancer."


    perhaps the way you opened your comments was part of the misunderstanding. you don't see it as a fight ("cancer is not a game, a contest, a marathon, or even a physical opponent. you cannot ball up your fist and knock it out, you cannot will it away, or will yourself into remission.") but many of us do see and experience it as a fight. it does seem to be a marathon at times and, although cancer itself is decidely not a game, the victims of cancer are often victims of chance which is an element of games.

    yes, some patients do exhibit amazing strength and grace in the face of a possibly terminal disease.

    i know that this amazing strength and grace is often the fruit of a significant struggle or contest.

    she did not lose a fight. cancer did not beat her. she did not fail at wanting to live badly enough.

    so, for the cancer victim...yes the cancer beat her and she did lose that fight. that was what my 38 year old friend told me (in so many words) when she was planning her funeral and trying make arrangements for the futures of her 10 and 13 yr old children. i sat with her as a breast cancer survivor (age 38) and she sat with me as a young woman dying from the same disease. the fights that she didn't lose were perhaps less obvious...the fight to keep positive for her children, to make those recordings for her daughter's graduation and wedding days, to support her husband and mother as they considered how they would ever continue without her.

    you see this as well...the legacy, the "impression" that we leave behind which you mentioned. i would encourage you to consider that it is not always easy to leave that positive impression when faced with your own mortality. my friend saw this as a battle and she was magnificent in her warfare...courageous, strong, unwilling to give up, inspite of the odds and opponents. her children benefit today from her fight on that field those years back.

    even paul equated the struggles of a faithful christian life to a "fight" and spoke of a "crown of victory".

    as for who do i want at my bedside when i am dying...i want the nurse who understands my goals, who is interested in what i need to be comfortable on a physical, emotional, and spiritual level. i want the nurse who allows me to fight or to faint according to my needs. the nurse who on tuesday can be my cheerleader in the game and on wednesday can hold my hand while i cry...then back to the battlefield on thursday. i do not want the nurse who cannot see that cancer is not one battle or fight...it is many and not all of them are lost when and because the patient dies.

    i do not doubt that you have compassion for your patients. please be careful with your difficulty with the concept of "fighting cancer"...your patients and families may very well not understand your dislike of that phrase and, frankly, they shouldn't have to.

    ps...i am surprised by carrid's comment that "there are no atheists on an oncology unit"...cuz there are plenty in hospice...atheists die from cancer just like muslims, jews, and pagans.

  • Apr 5

    Be pleasant but otherwise distant.
    All interactions are professional and concise.
    Do not consider this person a "team" member with you unless she earns your trust.
    Ignore drama and gossip and focus on your work.
    Always look for reasons to support your coworkers while keeping your work at your highest possible level.
    Have fun in spite of her.

  • Mar 30

    Your co-worker would benefit from an in-service on vaccine administration.

  • Mar 16

    Don't you have care conferences with this spouse and the care team?

  • Mar 15

    Actually, hospices can reach out to patients if their family requests the information visit.
    If the patient and family are in agreement with hospice, and the criteria for admission is met the hospice professional will then contact the PCP and request a medical referral and orders to admit.

    You also could ask the provider about hospice. You would have a much better idea of how that provider might react to that request. Some docs are not very nice about that sort of thing while others appreciate your input.

    Good luck and thanks for advocating for your patient!

  • Mar 15

    I was told when I moved to Fairbanks that Fairbanksans don't want their community to get too big. So I am supposed to tell everyone that it is too dark, too cold, and there is too much snow so they should stay in the lower 48.

    Other than that, I would highly recommend it. AK is a beautiful state and has lots of opportunity. AK has not been as troubled by the recession as the lower 48 have been. There are no dumb people in AK, they freeze along the road in the winter.

    Okay, that last comment was a bad joke, I will admit...and there is the matter of their recent Governor that would beg argument on the point anyway.

  • Mar 14

    As we practice our profession, we expand and enrich our professional knowledge. For instance, if you are expert in symptoms and their management, you have more information in your brain to inform your already well practiced critical thinking.

    Critical thinking skills should be developed over the lifetime of every human. We see evidence, everyday in our work of people who have poorly developed skills. These skills DO translate many many times into the nursing model. New grads who have more general life experience that demonstrate good critical thought development are more attractive to me as a manager than a new grad with little life experience.

  • Feb 9

    I am dismayed that the nurse who had a legal medical marijuana card was not hired because of it...
    Would that also have been true if the nurse had tested postive for ativan or some other med for which he/she had an RX?
    Like the other medications included on the drug screens, marijuana actually has proven medical benefit for some people in some circumstances, often with fewer side effects than other more "traditional" medications.

    so sad...

  • Feb 1

    Every specialty area has it's own unique set of stressors for nurses.

    The fact that you are only 6 months into this unit is, all by itself, stressful. When we change specialties it takes a minimum of 6 months typically to feel like we are not a danger to our patients. It takes about a year to feel proficient as a nurse in the department.

    Hang in there, stay connected with your peers and preceptors. You will come out good on the other side.

  • Jan 31

    Quote from ws582
    Very curious about something. I'm new to inpatient hospice and have only had 4 deaths so far. Two of the patients had a single tear. One of those patients, the niece saw her previously unresponsive aunt open her eyes wide focusing on something in front of her (not looking at her niece) then took her last few breaths. That's when I arrived I saw her tear. The other nonresponsive patient that passed did not have anyone in the room at the time, so I don't know if he opened his eyes or not, but did have the same single tear. Is this common, and do you think they are seeing something so beautiful it causes a tear, or do you think it's caused by fear/pain? Thank you in advance for your responses.
    I don't have any idea why they might have a tear...

    If I have done my job well, then I suspect that they are not in pain (spiritual, emotional, or physical) otherwise I would be expecting other evidence of the discomfort. We cannot know with certainty what our patients are experiencing at the end. We only know what our science, our faith, and our experience tells us.

    In my opinion, we should hold tight to the perceptions and beliefs that give us hope and strength. My mom opened her eyes as she took her last breaths, and she too had a tear in her eye.


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