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JBMmom, MSN, RN 9,774 Views

Joined: Jun 24, '09; Posts: 545 (46% Liked) ; Likes: 1,120

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  • 4:24 am

    There will always be something to feel guilty about. I will remember forever that I missed my son's first day of kindergarten because it was my first day of nursing school. My oldest cried every Sunday night the semester that I had evening clinicals Monday and Tuesday (and a day job), because I would not see them again until Wednesday. Even now, I just started a 7p-7a job and my 10- year old sniffled that I would be missing bedtime now when I work. But, I'm doing my best to provide for my family, and that's what they need. When I'm home I do my best to really be home, not on my phone or computer, spending time with them, so they know I'm really there. We will all get through, and when they talk about my school / 2 jobs / more school years, they don't focus on the times I missed, they have good memories of times together.

    And you're a nurse, period. Every job needs a different set of skills. Not better. Not worse. Unique. There are many aspects to a job, and one important one is how it fits with your life. You're doing your best, and your kids have a hard working mom as a role model, good work!

  • Apr 19

    There will always be something to feel guilty about. I will remember forever that I missed my son's first day of kindergarten because it was my first day of nursing school. My oldest cried every Sunday night the semester that I had evening clinicals Monday and Tuesday (and a day job), because I would not see them again until Wednesday. Even now, I just started a 7p-7a job and my 10- year old sniffled that I would be missing bedtime now when I work. But, I'm doing my best to provide for my family, and that's what they need. When I'm home I do my best to really be home, not on my phone or computer, spending time with them, so they know I'm really there. We will all get through, and when they talk about my school / 2 jobs / more school years, they don't focus on the times I missed, they have good memories of times together.

    And you're a nurse, period. Every job needs a different set of skills. Not better. Not worse. Unique. There are many aspects to a job, and one important one is how it fits with your life. You're doing your best, and your kids have a hard working mom as a role model, good work!

  • Apr 17

    There will always be something to feel guilty about. I will remember forever that I missed my son's first day of kindergarten because it was my first day of nursing school. My oldest cried every Sunday night the semester that I had evening clinicals Monday and Tuesday (and a day job), because I would not see them again until Wednesday. Even now, I just started a 7p-7a job and my 10- year old sniffled that I would be missing bedtime now when I work. But, I'm doing my best to provide for my family, and that's what they need. When I'm home I do my best to really be home, not on my phone or computer, spending time with them, so they know I'm really there. We will all get through, and when they talk about my school / 2 jobs / more school years, they don't focus on the times I missed, they have good memories of times together.

    And you're a nurse, period. Every job needs a different set of skills. Not better. Not worse. Unique. There are many aspects to a job, and one important one is how it fits with your life. You're doing your best, and your kids have a hard working mom as a role model, good work!

  • Apr 15

    Quote from Jenbripsu
    I am definitely seeing from the responses that this IS the norm and I have to say I'm disappointed. Apparently I was pretty naïve.
    However, it won't change a thing for how I will behave. I'm not saying that I won't ever talk about a patient. I will say that I won't call a patient a ****** ***** because they are in pain and then make fun of their military service. And I won't talk about them when the family is 15 feet away. But other than that, I am certainly not saying I am better than anyone. I wanted to know if it was normal and apparently, the answer is yes. In 6 months in clinical experiences, this is the first time I heard a nurse talk like this, so I was surprised. That's all.
    No, it's not the norm. And no, it's not right. I think that sometimes when students come here and criticize practicing nurses on a variety of issues, there are numerous responses related to "wait until you're a nurse and then see what you do when.....", but you're right, there is no reason for that to happen.

    You said you have years of experience in the professional environment. Certainly you must have had coworkers that were petty and small minded. Well, now you're going to work with some nurses that are petty and small minded, different field, same personalities. You don't have to be one of them, just as you weren't in your previous professional experiences. I'm sorry that you're disappointed because of this experience, but I know you've been around long enough to know people are just people. I hear plenty of that from other nurses and to be honest, I don't bother to get involved with those conversations because calling someone out is only going to cause ill will, it's not going to change how they are and they will still do it. Don't be discouraged, it doesn't happen everywhere, and you'll quickly find the people you want to avoid because they don't act in a manner you agree with.

  • Apr 15

    There will always be something to feel guilty about. I will remember forever that I missed my son's first day of kindergarten because it was my first day of nursing school. My oldest cried every Sunday night the semester that I had evening clinicals Monday and Tuesday (and a day job), because I would not see them again until Wednesday. Even now, I just started a 7p-7a job and my 10- year old sniffled that I would be missing bedtime now when I work. But, I'm doing my best to provide for my family, and that's what they need. When I'm home I do my best to really be home, not on my phone or computer, spending time with them, so they know I'm really there. We will all get through, and when they talk about my school / 2 jobs / more school years, they don't focus on the times I missed, they have good memories of times together.

    And you're a nurse, period. Every job needs a different set of skills. Not better. Not worse. Unique. There are many aspects to a job, and one important one is how it fits with your life. You're doing your best, and your kids have a hard working mom as a role model, good work!

  • Apr 14

    There will always be something to feel guilty about. I will remember forever that I missed my son's first day of kindergarten because it was my first day of nursing school. My oldest cried every Sunday night the semester that I had evening clinicals Monday and Tuesday (and a day job), because I would not see them again until Wednesday. Even now, I just started a 7p-7a job and my 10- year old sniffled that I would be missing bedtime now when I work. But, I'm doing my best to provide for my family, and that's what they need. When I'm home I do my best to really be home, not on my phone or computer, spending time with them, so they know I'm really there. We will all get through, and when they talk about my school / 2 jobs / more school years, they don't focus on the times I missed, they have good memories of times together.

    And you're a nurse, period. Every job needs a different set of skills. Not better. Not worse. Unique. There are many aspects to a job, and one important one is how it fits with your life. You're doing your best, and your kids have a hard working mom as a role model, good work!

  • Apr 9

    Quote from Jenbripsu
    I am definitely seeing from the responses that this IS the norm and I have to say I'm disappointed. Apparently I was pretty naïve.
    However, it won't change a thing for how I will behave. I'm not saying that I won't ever talk about a patient. I will say that I won't call a patient a ****** ***** because they are in pain and then make fun of their military service. And I won't talk about them when the family is 15 feet away. But other than that, I am certainly not saying I am better than anyone. I wanted to know if it was normal and apparently, the answer is yes. In 6 months in clinical experiences, this is the first time I heard a nurse talk like this, so I was surprised. That's all.
    No, it's not the norm. And no, it's not right. I think that sometimes when students come here and criticize practicing nurses on a variety of issues, there are numerous responses related to "wait until you're a nurse and then see what you do when.....", but you're right, there is no reason for that to happen.

    You said you have years of experience in the professional environment. Certainly you must have had coworkers that were petty and small minded. Well, now you're going to work with some nurses that are petty and small minded, different field, same personalities. You don't have to be one of them, just as you weren't in your previous professional experiences. I'm sorry that you're disappointed because of this experience, but I know you've been around long enough to know people are just people. I hear plenty of that from other nurses and to be honest, I don't bother to get involved with those conversations because calling someone out is only going to cause ill will, it's not going to change how they are and they will still do it. Don't be discouraged, it doesn't happen everywhere, and you'll quickly find the people you want to avoid because they don't act in a manner you agree with.

  • Apr 9

    Quote from Jenbripsu
    I am definitely seeing from the responses that this IS the norm and I have to say I'm disappointed. Apparently I was pretty naïve.
    However, it won't change a thing for how I will behave. I'm not saying that I won't ever talk about a patient. I will say that I won't call a patient a ****** ***** because they are in pain and then make fun of their military service. And I won't talk about them when the family is 15 feet away. But other than that, I am certainly not saying I am better than anyone. I wanted to know if it was normal and apparently, the answer is yes. In 6 months in clinical experiences, this is the first time I heard a nurse talk like this, so I was surprised. That's all.
    No, it's not the norm. And no, it's not right. I think that sometimes when students come here and criticize practicing nurses on a variety of issues, there are numerous responses related to "wait until you're a nurse and then see what you do when.....", but you're right, there is no reason for that to happen.

    You said you have years of experience in the professional environment. Certainly you must have had coworkers that were petty and small minded. Well, now you're going to work with some nurses that are petty and small minded, different field, same personalities. You don't have to be one of them, just as you weren't in your previous professional experiences. I'm sorry that you're disappointed because of this experience, but I know you've been around long enough to know people are just people. I hear plenty of that from other nurses and to be honest, I don't bother to get involved with those conversations because calling someone out is only going to cause ill will, it's not going to change how they are and they will still do it. Don't be discouraged, it doesn't happen everywhere, and you'll quickly find the people you want to avoid because they don't act in a manner you agree with.

  • Apr 9

    Quote from Jenbripsu
    I am definitely seeing from the responses that this IS the norm and I have to say I'm disappointed. Apparently I was pretty naïve.
    However, it won't change a thing for how I will behave. I'm not saying that I won't ever talk about a patient. I will say that I won't call a patient a ****** ***** because they are in pain and then make fun of their military service. And I won't talk about them when the family is 15 feet away. But other than that, I am certainly not saying I am better than anyone. I wanted to know if it was normal and apparently, the answer is yes. In 6 months in clinical experiences, this is the first time I heard a nurse talk like this, so I was surprised. That's all.
    No, it's not the norm. And no, it's not right. I think that sometimes when students come here and criticize practicing nurses on a variety of issues, there are numerous responses related to "wait until you're a nurse and then see what you do when.....", but you're right, there is no reason for that to happen.

    You said you have years of experience in the professional environment. Certainly you must have had coworkers that were petty and small minded. Well, now you're going to work with some nurses that are petty and small minded, different field, same personalities. You don't have to be one of them, just as you weren't in your previous professional experiences. I'm sorry that you're disappointed because of this experience, but I know you've been around long enough to know people are just people. I hear plenty of that from other nurses and to be honest, I don't bother to get involved with those conversations because calling someone out is only going to cause ill will, it's not going to change how they are and they will still do it. Don't be discouraged, it doesn't happen everywhere, and you'll quickly find the people you want to avoid because they don't act in a manner you agree with.

  • Apr 9

    We were recently told that morphine and dilaudid supplies were temporarily out in our hospital and we started pushing fentanyl on the med surg units. Our orders were generally on the order of 25 micrograms, so we were wasting 75 micrograms every time. When we had dilaudid, a popular dose was 1.2 mg, and it would require a 0.8mg waste every time- (we were out of 0.5). If there wasn't so much waste, we probably wouldn't have these shortages!

  • Apr 9

    Quote from Jenbripsu
    I am definitely seeing from the responses that this IS the norm and I have to say I'm disappointed. Apparently I was pretty naïve.
    However, it won't change a thing for how I will behave. I'm not saying that I won't ever talk about a patient. I will say that I won't call a patient a ****** ***** because they are in pain and then make fun of their military service. And I won't talk about them when the family is 15 feet away. But other than that, I am certainly not saying I am better than anyone. I wanted to know if it was normal and apparently, the answer is yes. In 6 months in clinical experiences, this is the first time I heard a nurse talk like this, so I was surprised. That's all.
    No, it's not the norm. And no, it's not right. I think that sometimes when students come here and criticize practicing nurses on a variety of issues, there are numerous responses related to "wait until you're a nurse and then see what you do when.....", but you're right, there is no reason for that to happen.

    You said you have years of experience in the professional environment. Certainly you must have had coworkers that were petty and small minded. Well, now you're going to work with some nurses that are petty and small minded, different field, same personalities. You don't have to be one of them, just as you weren't in your previous professional experiences. I'm sorry that you're disappointed because of this experience, but I know you've been around long enough to know people are just people. I hear plenty of that from other nurses and to be honest, I don't bother to get involved with those conversations because calling someone out is only going to cause ill will, it's not going to change how they are and they will still do it. Don't be discouraged, it doesn't happen everywhere, and you'll quickly find the people you want to avoid because they don't act in a manner you agree with.

  • Apr 9

    We were recently told that morphine and dilaudid supplies were temporarily out in our hospital and we started pushing fentanyl on the med surg units. Our orders were generally on the order of 25 micrograms, so we were wasting 75 micrograms every time. When we had dilaudid, a popular dose was 1.2 mg, and it would require a 0.8mg waste every time- (we were out of 0.5). If there wasn't so much waste, we probably wouldn't have these shortages!

  • Apr 6

    We were recently told that morphine and dilaudid supplies were temporarily out in our hospital and we started pushing fentanyl on the med surg units. Our orders were generally on the order of 25 micrograms, so we were wasting 75 micrograms every time. When we had dilaudid, a popular dose was 1.2 mg, and it would require a 0.8mg waste every time- (we were out of 0.5). If there wasn't so much waste, we probably wouldn't have these shortages!

  • Apr 6

    It's hard to summarize a career decision in a single sentence. After many years in one field, the likelihood of unemployment as the primary bread winner in the household led me to find new options. So, financial need was the ultimate driver because I probably would still be in pharmaceutical research if it still provided for my family. However, when weighing my potential options, the field of nursing provided multiple diverse opportunities to help people and it seemed like it would be a good fit.

  • Apr 6

    We were recently told that morphine and dilaudid supplies were temporarily out in our hospital and we started pushing fentanyl on the med surg units. Our orders were generally on the order of 25 micrograms, so we were wasting 75 micrograms every time. When we had dilaudid, a popular dose was 1.2 mg, and it would require a 0.8mg waste every time- (we were out of 0.5). If there wasn't so much waste, we probably wouldn't have these shortages!


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