Content That Future O.R. Nurse Likes

Content That Future O.R. Nurse Likes

Future O.R. Nurse 1,547 Views

Joined Apr 4, '09. Posts: 99 (25% Liked) Likes: 51

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  • Jan 15 '11

    This is what happens when people comment without checking the facts. In order to qualify for this loan repayment, you must work for a non-profit underserved area, so there are stipulations to getting your loan forgiven. Everyone doesnt JUST get it automatically. It does come in exchange for something and with a term contract, so yes although you are getting paid while working, you are also serving a community that doesnt have adequate access and resources to health care. Unfortunatelty, everyone was not brought up in a middle class family or is able to find the "promised" job once they graduate. Others who do, may encounter major lifestyle changes, responsibilities or setbacks (such as raising children, ailing parents or even a crisis situation such as a cancer diagnosis or the lost of a spouse who provided financial stability) that can cause the good intentions of paying back (every penny) to be more difficult than initially expected. I am all for this bill! So what if YOU didnt get xyz when you were paying YOUR loans. This is a self-fish (and troll-ish) way of thinking. So, you only approve something if it benefits you? Have you considered how this could benefits others? Or were you too busy consumed in your own issues to even care? This is the problem with the world today, we lack the simple concept of compassion and understanding for others!!!! I am glad you were able to fulfill your financial obligations...but sometimes LIFE happens and you require a HELPING hand...in whatever form it comes, be it loan forgiveness or simply understanding from a total stranger. Why dont you try being that stranger?

  • Jan 4 '11

    Quote from Maggie in NC
    New fun thread. Please finish the sentence:

    NO she/he did not:

    Mine:
    NO SHE DID NOT WALK INTO CLASS WITH a RED THONG CLEARLY SHOWING UNDER HER UNIFORM!:smackingf
    No she did not raise her hand and ask (during a Pharm test) "How many cc's are in a ml?"

  • Jan 4 '11

    Quote from ManyRN2B
    Check the patients respirations by grabing her wrist and looking at the clock...
    but....thats how i do it. granted i hold their wrist, count their pulses first then continue to hold their wrist and look at the clock every so often while watching their chest rise and fall.

    you do count people's respirations by holding the pt's wrists and looking at the clock. alot of health care professionals do it that way. its so that the patient doesnt know youre counting their respirations and change their breathing pattern.

    pretty slick, eh?

  • Jan 4 '11

    Check the patients respirations by grabing her wrist and looking at the clock.

    My other friend in OB, asked the patient " how is your lochia?" The patient said. " my what?" LOL........She should have said, "how is your bleeding?"

    Tell our instructor he didn't know how to make a bed (senior) EEks!

  • Jan 4 '11

    Third semester, this is for my study buddy:

    No she DID NOT just check that man's prosthetic leg for a pulse thinking it was the real deal!!!

  • Jan 4 '11

    wow.....i wouldnt even have the nerve to take a pic..let alone post it.....not to smart on her part...

  • Dec 28 '10

    Quote from Future O.R. Nurse
    I think experience is what you make it. I am not so pessimistic to think I would never get a job. My goal is to be a nurse and care for people,. Even if that means a doctors office or some other healthcare setting, I am accomplishing the immediate goal. So yes, the one year clinical experience does matter. Its all in what you make of it, and how you market the experience. There is not only one strategy to getting a job, there are many.. There are also many factors that play into getting the job or not... How well do you interview, how well do you market yourself, are you willing to relocate, can you pass the psychological exam that the hospitals give.. There are so many factors... I will not let anyone kill my joy. Everyone's experience is unique.

    Future O R Nurse, I wish you all the best when you do graduate. There are graduates right now who had and are still trying to keep that joy in our hearts and caring and empathy that made us want to be in this profession in the first place, but 1 year clinical experience today does not mean any thing. Every interview I have ever had I came out a winner and got that job but these days hundreds of applications or resumes are being sent out by graduates with no response. Oh, I also had 2 years clinical experience in hospitals that never responded and there were at least 3.

    I applaud you for your optimism and braveness but girl the nursing profession is not what it used to be. I hope that optimism still lives on when you graduate and come out here looking for a job.

    Not to take aware your bright light, just sharing some wisdom and knowledge.

  • Dec 28 '10

    Personally, I applaud the new regulations bringing about non-smoking restaurants and non-smoking everything else. The smell of cigarette smoke is disgusting and its a shame that smokers don't realize how horrid they smell. In class, there are 2 smokers in front of me and 1 behind me. They reek.

    I used to work at a company that afforded jobs to disabled adults, some of them so severely disabled that they really didn't do any work, it's just a place for them to go. Their "assistants" would take their clients outside in their wheelchairs at the back door and sit there and chain smoked. The poor clients had to sit there in that blue smoke cloud, eyes watering, and weren't even able to speak for themselves to complain. I began a successful campaign to put a stop to it. Sure, some people weren't happy with that but frankly, I am unconcerned about that.

    At the clinical site we're at, there is no smoking whatsoever on their property. That includes inside one's personal car and they have cameras everywhere to enforce the policy. Employees can be fired. As nursing students, if we even have a hint of the cigarette smoke smell on our persons or uniforms or whatever, we're sent home with an absence for that day.

    And I agree with those who say its a shame a smoker can't get through a shift/movie/meal/whatever without smoking.

    Also, it really ticks me off to see parents driving around in a car full of smoke with babies, toddlers, and small children closed up in the chemical cloud, no fresh air to be found. Dramatic? Sure, but its also true.

  • Dec 28 '10

    Quote from SarahMaria
    The hospitals that are smoke-free not only require staff to smoke elsewhere (if not at all), but also the patients and visitors. [I know I'm going to get slammed for this] I think this is wrong for non-staff and non-critically ill patients. If one is a hospice patient and dying, and he/she wants to go outside and smoke, why not?
    I actually agree with allowing hospice patient to have a cigarette is he or she so chooses. However, it should be in consideration of others.

    As far as providing 'smoking areas' to visitors and non-staff.. why should any hospital have to do this? We can't even get most places to offer a place for breastfeeding mothers, yet they should provide smokers with accommodations? No. Smoking is not in the bill of rights.

  • Dec 22 '10

    Quote from Anne36
    Thanks Junebug. Can you compare any of your classes to A&P? So far this is my hardest class.

    First Junebug is correct - it's difficult because of amount of material. There's not one single thing that if dissected on its own, can be construed as difficult. Somethings are more challenging than others and you don't have a lot of time to spend focused solely on anyone one thing.

    To answer your question, they are too different to compare. A lot of A & P is memory based while nursing applies a critical thinking concept to their teaching and testing methods. You have to learn to 'read between the lines' for example. If all we had to learn was term definitions in nursing, we'd all fly through it with flying colors. For example, in skin care, if you learned that dehiscence is a partial reopening of a wound, that's all happy and good...but what are you going to do with that information? There are probably 6 different questions they can ask on that topic without asking you what the definition of the word is (in fact, I picked that example because they 'gave' us the definition as part of the question i.e 'Dehiscence, which is a partial reopening of a wound...'...so memorizing definitions is necessary in one sense, but not because they're going to ask you these types of questions on a test. You have to ask yourself, when may this happen - perhaps after a surgery. Why may it happen, patient moves around too much??? Inappropriate nursing interventions that cause the patient to move and cause this condition to occur - what protocol should you follow if you notice this...should you apply a saline soaked dressing, leave it open, ask the patient to get up, lie still, etc...call the doctor??? There are many ways that one topic could be addressed and when they ask the question, they assume you already know what it means, even if you never seen the word ever before you read the chapter.

    Occasionally, you'll get a 'gimme' where it may be triage related (i.e in an ER, who would you treat first, someone with difficulty breathing or someone who's depressed because their girlfriend just broke up with them). But don't count on many of those.

  • Dec 15 '10

    Quote from fairandbalanced
    Is my rage justified. My friend just flunked out of her first semester of Nursing School with a 76 average. 77 is the cut. The failing question (and I don't know it word for word, but here is the general gist of it): An african woman who lives in Africa has an intestinal bug. She believes that by eating pumpkin seeds, the bug will be eliminated. Is this a : religious belief, a cultural belief, is she correct, and few other choices. My friend answered, a cultural belief. As per the teacher: WRONG. First of all, regardless of the question or answer, how is this question even relevant to Nursing? Upon doing her homework and research, my friend could argue it very much IS a cultural thing. She appealed the question. The woman who wrote the question refused to budge and the appeals committee sided with her. So boom. My freind is out. Never mind she is an excellent student. I am outraged. 44 people apparently missed this question. When teachers result to trickery on exams, it is so unfair and the students will never win. What can be done about this? This is, no doubt, a power issue and the teacher is getting off on it. People like that have got to go. BTW, she is a mean and unhappy woman who has been teaching at the school forever. I am beginning in January at the same institution. If I wasn't sufficiently terrified before, I certainly am now. Feedback, please.
    No, your rage is not justified. Your friend set herself up for failure long before she missed whatever question this actually was. It's a poor strategy as a student and as a nurse to knowingly leave yourself a smaller margin of error than you absolutely have to and gamble your entire future career on the small probability that you can have an average of 76% going in and expect to do well enough on that one test to keep the entire train from derailing.

    The particulars of that one question aren't really relevant, but even if they were -- you are asking us to evaluate a question while providing us with vague information and only two of the possible answers out of an unknown ("a few") number of other possible answers. From the information that is provided, "cultural" does sound like it would be correct, but that still doesn't address the central issue. The reason it's relevant to nursing is that we often encounter people who's cultural beliefs are at odds with standard Western medical care, so we have to be sensitive to that and do a lot of explaining without seeming to be disrespectful of their traditional beliefs. Every nursing program has questions like these. I had a test question in one class that started off like that one, but the patient thought their disease was caused by "the evil eye". It would be inappropriate to mock that belief, while at the same time we need to educate the patient about the science of their disorder and explain the treatment and how it works.

    You might suggest that all the homework and research she put into her attempt to get her answer accepted would have been better done all along, so that one question would not make or break her entire future in school. On the plus side, it's her first semester, and now she has a chance to alter her future behavior without losing years of nursing school, as happens sometimes.

    You and/or your friend describe the teacher as a deceptive power-tripping person who gets off on getting people kicked out of the program. But you don't know this person. I've had people tell me such and such person is a fire-breathing battleaxe from hell and then found out myself they were actually likeable, so don't go into school assuming the worst about anyone. I think that is just the decent thing to do. Best wishes in nursing school!

  • Dec 15 '10

    Quote from beejaycee
    I double-checked w/another student since the final was 100 Qs long and I didn't specifically remember this one. NOLA1980 is dead on - there was enough info in the Q to pick the correct answer.
    More double-checking (i.e. checking with smarter students w/better memories): the 2 choices listed by the OP are both incorrect and the info listed as being in the Q is incorrect. The correct answer was a MORE obvious answer.

  • Dec 15 '10

    Quote from That Guy
    What about the other questions she missed on the test? What is the excuse for missing those?


    I was wondering the same thing. I find it hard to believe that your "friend" failed for missing one question. True enough, one more question may have caused her to pass but this person probably went into the last test at risk for failing. So why are you so outraged? I am not at all being judgmental but I just finished my third semester of NS and it seems like everyone who failed, failed by 1 point. Ummm Yeah..... that's not true. As far as the teacher situation, I have heard so many stories about instructors being mean and unfair and when I meet them, I don't see any of that. I find out later that the students weren't prepared for clinical, showing up late to tests and clinical and want to be babysat the whole time and the instructors get frustrated. I totally understand why. So my advice to you.... Please go into your program with an open mind. You are going to ruin your own experience listening to disgruntled students who expect to be babysat through nursing school.

  • Dec 15 '10

    Quote from CRod2011
    I was wondering the same thing. I find it hard to believe that your "friend" failed for missing one question. True enough, one more question may have caused her to pass but this person probably went into the last test at risk for failing. So why are you so outraged? I am not at all being judgmental but I just finished my third semester of NS and it seems like everyone who failed, failed by 1 point. Ummm Yeah..... that's not true. As far as the teacher situation, I have heard so many stories about instructors being mean and unfair and when I meet them, I don't see any of that. I find out later that the students weren't prepared for clinical, showing up late to tests and clinical and want to be babysat the whole time and the instructors get frustrated. I totally understand why. So my advice to you.... Please go into your program with an open mind. You are going to ruin your own experience listening to disgruntled students who expect to be babysat through nursing school.
    People always want someone to blame other than themselves. It took me a long time to realize that it was my fault for not passing the third semester. I thought about it, looked back on it and realized I could learn a lot more if I didnt fight it every day of that semester. I thought my life was over when I failed the semester the first time, but when I readjusted my attitude, it worked wonders in my tests and assignments.

    Sometimes you have to look within and say wow I messed up as opposed to "the teacher screwed me". Own up to your mistakes and life is better that way.

  • Nov 28 '10

    someone mentioned worksource... yes! contact worksource ASAP!! they pay for books, tuition, and if you qualify you get travel money too. set up an appointment as soon as possible. they are one of the best resources.


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