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PacoUSA, BSN, RN 36,602 Views

Joined Mar 25, '09. Posts: 3,505 (33% Liked) Likes: 3,374

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  • Mar 1

    Now that you have taken her first exam, you now know her style and how she asked questions. My advice:

    (1) Get a tutor! Does your school offer free tutoring?

    (2) Find out who got the 98 ... seriously, that person may be able to give you insight on how they did well at the very least.

    (3) Never go to lecture before reading the textbook or whatever other reading material you have. You may not understand everything you read first read through and that is OK, it only empowers you with the background knowledge to understand what goes on in class.

    (4) Get one of those study guides that break down topics in plain language. I have Barron's Microbiology The Easy Way and it's very good. I don't know if they have it for A&P.

    (5) Finally, DON'T sit anywhere but the FRONT ROW in the class. I do this because I don't want anything in my field of vision during class except the professor. I am 100% focused on her and what she is saying. Classmates chit-chatting and moving during class distract me, and for that 80 minute session I want to be devoted to what's being taught.

    I got A's in A&P 1&2, if there is anything that really stumps you, send me a private msg and I will see if I can help! (BTW, I just noticed you have only 1 msg posted on here so far, you need at least 10 to use private messaging - so KEEP POSTING!!)

  • Feb 28

    Now that you have taken her first exam, you now know her style and how she asked questions. My advice:

    (1) Get a tutor! Does your school offer free tutoring?

    (2) Find out who got the 98 ... seriously, that person may be able to give you insight on how they did well at the very least.

    (3) Never go to lecture before reading the textbook or whatever other reading material you have. You may not understand everything you read first read through and that is OK, it only empowers you with the background knowledge to understand what goes on in class.

    (4) Get one of those study guides that break down topics in plain language. I have Barron's Microbiology The Easy Way and it's very good. I don't know if they have it for A&P.

    (5) Finally, DON'T sit anywhere but the FRONT ROW in the class. I do this because I don't want anything in my field of vision during class except the professor. I am 100% focused on her and what she is saying. Classmates chit-chatting and moving during class distract me, and for that 80 minute session I want to be devoted to what's being taught.

    I got A's in A&P 1&2, if there is anything that really stumps you, send me a private msg and I will see if I can help! (BTW, I just noticed you have only 1 msg posted on here so far, you need at least 10 to use private messaging - so KEEP POSTING!!)

  • Feb 28

    Now that you have taken her first exam, you now know her style and how she asked questions. My advice:

    (1) Get a tutor! Does your school offer free tutoring?

    (2) Find out who got the 98 ... seriously, that person may be able to give you insight on how they did well at the very least.

    (3) Never go to lecture before reading the textbook or whatever other reading material you have. You may not understand everything you read first read through and that is OK, it only empowers you with the background knowledge to understand what goes on in class.

    (4) Get one of those study guides that break down topics in plain language. I have Barron's Microbiology The Easy Way and it's very good. I don't know if they have it for A&P.

    (5) Finally, DON'T sit anywhere but the FRONT ROW in the class. I do this because I don't want anything in my field of vision during class except the professor. I am 100% focused on her and what she is saying. Classmates chit-chatting and moving during class distract me, and for that 80 minute session I want to be devoted to what's being taught.

    I got A's in A&P 1&2, if there is anything that really stumps you, send me a private msg and I will see if I can help! (BTW, I just noticed you have only 1 msg posted on here so far, you need at least 10 to use private messaging - so KEEP POSTING!!)

  • Feb 21

    I had to revive this thread as I have worked in both med/surg/tele (msT) and cardiac/tele (cT) and can speak to both experiences.

    By far, I love cT much more. My unit has an on-site tele tech whereas my old msT unit was remote. The patients are different too, my cT unit has a lot more walkie talkies yet the msT unit had more totals and a wider variety of conditions ... but then again we got a LOT more dementia patients. That unit was known as the dumping ground so we used to see everything and anything. Once we had a patient come in with a diagnosis of "homelessness" ... I mean, seriously??? The one thing I love about working on a cT unit is that I no longer deal with ETOH withdrawal patients. Our unit specifically does not take them, and I am grateful. They are probably the patients I dislike to take care of the most for different reasons (2nd being the dementia patients that try to get out of bed very 5 minutes). I would love to eventually work in CCU or CTICU so I feel focusing on cT would be more beneficial for me and for anyone else with this goal.

    Another side benefit for me on working cT over msT is getting away from the micromanagement on my old unit. This is only specific to my experience tho. I now work under a manager not breathing down my neck and lambasting me for finding an alcohol pad under my patient's bed or for forgetting to label an IV site with date, time, gauge AND initials or for not placing a special 'wash hands with soap and water' sign outside a C. diff patient room. High turnover? You bet! Not dealing with this now is a huge breath of fresh air!

    Curious to hear from the OP and hear an update.

    ETA: I saw your most recent posts, OP. Looks like you're now in case management ... good for you!


    Sent from my iPad using allnurses

  • Feb 10

    I once had a patient who requested to have her feet rubbed before sleep. I flat out refused. She said other nurses did it (because they didn't have the courage to say no). I still refused. She happened to be one of the nastiest patients to staff I've ever encountered, so nasty that staff had to be rotated every day. The DON even screamed at her once out of frustration. It was my pleasure not giving in to her Waldorf desire, and at that point I couldn't have cared less about Press-Ganey scores!!


    Sent from my iPad using allnurses

  • Jan 22

    Had a patient once convinced she was taking Interpol for her BP ... Um, metoprolol ... no espionage here ...

    LOL


    Sent from my iPad using allnurses

  • Jan 22

    Had a patient once convinced she was taking Interpol for her BP ... Um, metoprolol ... no espionage here ...

    LOL


    Sent from my iPad using allnurses

  • Jan 22

    Had a patient once convinced she was taking Interpol for her BP ... Um, metoprolol ... no espionage here ...

    LOL


    Sent from my iPad using allnurses

  • Jan 21

    3 months? It will be a year if that before you even START to become comfortable in M/S. While I agree that 7-8 patients is a lot, you need to give it more time and prevent from looking like a jumper. I personally have more than 3 years in a similar specialty (having tele experience helps me work with less patients sometimes) and I am very comfortable with 4 patients. Once the 5th patient rolls around, it starts to get a little hectic. Never worked with more than 6 patients at once, the charting alone is ridiculous. Honestly cannot see how you can quality care for patients any higher than 4.


    Sent from my iPad using allnurses

  • Jan 21

    3 months? It will be a year if that before you even START to become comfortable in M/S. While I agree that 7-8 patients is a lot, you need to give it more time and prevent from looking like a jumper. I personally have more than 3 years in a similar specialty (having tele experience helps me work with less patients sometimes) and I am very comfortable with 4 patients. Once the 5th patient rolls around, it starts to get a little hectic. Never worked with more than 6 patients at once, the charting alone is ridiculous. Honestly cannot see how you can quality care for patients any higher than 4.


    Sent from my iPad using allnurses

  • Jan 16

    In an accelerated program, working full time is virtually impossible. As it is, it was hard with a part-time job of only 8 hours/week! But thank God, this is almost over!!

  • Jan 13

    In an accelerated program, working full time is virtually impossible. As it is, it was hard with a part-time job of only 8 hours/week! But thank God, this is almost over!!

  • Jan 11

    Good for you! I totally agree with your suggestions. Times have changed, and being a little more aggressive in networking is what will prevent you from being a new-grad-with-no-job-after-graduation statistic. I don't care who you are, if you haven't landed a job even after networking, you have either given up or you're doing something wrong. Aggressive does not mean rude or abrupt -- it means being charming and standing out, and that does not mean kiss-ass either. You need to be the kind of person that they want to work with, and show it.

    I was a little softer-spoken than you perhaps, but I managed to meet the right people and that ultimately led me to interview and land my first job (I was called and offered the position literally an hour after I graduated). I noticed some of my fellow classmates were trying to be aggressive during clinicals, jumping at the chance at being the one to get all the good opportunities to learn and observe skills, pushing everyone else aside so that they can be noticed. There is no need to do that, you just need to be good at what you do. I was one of those pushed aside by some of these people .. and here I am with a job and those that pushed me are still searching. Don't want to call it "karma" but it's a good example of what NOT to do.

    I hope many on here take your advice and proactively use it. Sitting on one's ass sending resumes out into the black hole known as cyberspace without meeting a breathing soul does not produce the same results as literally pounding the pavement.

  • Jan 1

    I am glad I found this thread. I am starting on a med/tele floor next week (going through nursing orientation right now) and am considering going to the ICU after a couple of years of experience on med/tele ... probably at a different hospital from where I am now (as I would like to relocate later). Interested to see how relevant my experience would be for the new role in critical care.

  • Dec 29 '16

    Quote from Anoetos
    If 50 is the new 30, I guess that makes 60 the new 40?
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]Does that go without saying then that 40 is the new 20??? ...

    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]I would love to see the OP come back and report that she has become an RN ... ... you are NEVER too old to pursue your dreams!
    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]

    [FONT=Franklin Gothic Medium]I'm also one who plans to be carted out, stethescope and all. I shudder sometimes to picture myself in retirement as sitting in a rocking chair watching and waiting for life to end. My idea of retirement is part-time work, and that hopefully won't happen until my 70's.


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