Latest Likes For PacoUSA

Latest Likes For PacoUSA

PacoUSA, BSN, RN 32,332 Views

Joined Mar 25, '09. Posts: 3,502 (33% Liked) Likes: 3,331

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  • Jul 26

    Quote from KelRN215
    I've never heard of a nursing license being granted as a wall certificate.
    New York sends one in addition to a paper license.


    Sent from my iPad using allnurses

  • Jul 22

    I don't feel sorry for you people that lose $200 in an attempt at instant gratification. Take test and forget about it, do something more fun with your time. The $200 could have been spent celebrating that the test is over!

  • Jul 22

    I don't feel sorry for you people that lose $200 in an attempt at instant gratification. Take test and forget about it, do something more fun with your time. The $200 could have been spent celebrating that the test is over!

  • Jul 21

    I don't feel sorry for you people that lose $200 in an attempt at instant gratification. Take test and forget about it, do something more fun with your time. The $200 could have been spent celebrating that the test is over!

  • Jul 21

    I don't feel sorry for you people that lose $200 in an attempt at instant gratification. Take test and forget about it, do something more fun with your time. The $200 could have been spent celebrating that the test is over!

  • Jul 20

    I don't feel sorry for you people that lose $200 in an attempt at instant gratification. Take test and forget about it, do something more fun with your time. The $200 could have been spent celebrating that the test is over!

  • Jul 20

    I don't feel sorry for you people that lose $200 in an attempt at instant gratification. Take test and forget about it, do something more fun with your time. The $200 could have been spent celebrating that the test is over!

  • Jul 20

    I don't feel sorry for you people that lose $200 in an attempt at instant gratification. Take test and forget about it, do something more fun with your time. The $200 could have been spent celebrating that the test is over!

  • Jul 10

    "No updates."


    Sent from my iPad using allnurses

  • Jul 7

    Quote from Aprillwone
    I am in my 50's. I could never get a job at a hospital med/surg. I graduated with honors at 48. Any suggestions? A BSN.
    You keep trying and never give up. Someone will hire you. My classmate was 62 when she was hired as a MS tele nurse and has since successfully transitioned to case management now at 67. Networking is also the key!

  • Jul 5

    Go to California, I believe it is the BEST place to start out as a traveler. Caution, it might spoil you for every other place out there lol. But seriously, do it and you wont regret it.

  • Jul 2

    I agree with this poster above. I have 4 years of ms/tele/stepdown experience and took an intro emergency nursing certificate program on my own dime to demonstrate commitment to the new specialty. It is on my resume and I have been getting interviews. They are scheduled and pending. Let's see if they blossom into a job. You have to demonstrate a commitment to the new specialty beyond what skills you already have. If that means getting some new certifications, do it! The investment is worth to make you stand out.

  • Jul 1

    As a general rule, I never document meds as given until I physically see the patient take them or I administer them via PEG or injection or IV. Also, I would never leave meds at the bedside for patients to take "later" ... If they are not ready to take them when I am there, I leave the room with them and come back later. This also applies to something as simple as simethicone, and it goes without saying that it applies to narcotics as well. While I can see their point about false documentation with respect to meds given in this manner, I do believe this should have been a re-education opportunity as opposed to a flat out termination. I know this is hard to grasp right now, but consider this their loss and a chance to pursue work with an employer that values you more. Also go into your next gig embracing the same rule I follow above: never document until the meds are actually administered.

    Oh by the way, if a patient refuses a medication ... I no longer stay at the bedside begging for them to take it like I did when I was a new grad. Ain't nobody got time for that with 5 patients. One NO is enough for me to document Patient Refused and alert the doctor accordingly. Patients have a right to refuse medication, any medication, it is outlined in the bill of patient rights they get upon admission. The best thing we can do is educate them on what the medication is for and why it's important for them to take it. If they refuse again, that's on them, and documenting that you educated them despite refusal and alerted the MD protects you.

  • May 16

    Quote from iowa27
    Need help here.....I've just become an RN after a long career in another field. I've just been hired to start on a med-surg floor and have now completed my 6th shift with my preceptor.
    I'm very frustrated with myself and can't help but think that my preceptor is going crazy, even though I continually get positive feedback.
    I'm finding that there is so much to "take in" throughout the day, while I normally keep up, I know it's only because I have someone "holding my hand.
    I feel as though I'm always asking some of the same questions before it finally "sinks in", while I know I'm slow because I'm scared to death that I'm about to kill my patient by giving the wrong med, wrong time, etc.

    During hand-off there seems to be so much info given that much of the info starts to get lost on me, and I feel as though I'm shutting down before I even start the day.

    I really want to succeed at this, but am wondering if the stress of this is worth it at my age.

    Any advice out there?

    Thanks in advance
    The problem with med-surg is that there are too many patients per nurse, and too many details to keep track of. Ask me if so-and-so has COPD and I will literally pause for 5 seconds to think if that is true. Patients are also sicker now than they were 30 years ago and medications are also more diverse and complex. To get more than 4 patients these days I feel is already substandard care. When the job becomes more about "getting crap done" and less about "lets think about what we need to do to get this patient better care," it's not nursing anymore. And I do think many nurses are simply not programmed to work with more than a couple of patients at a a time. I've been a nurse for 3 years and I still detest having anything above 3 patients. I was once floated to a cardiac stepdown with 3 patients to care for and I felt like I could do it forever. I don't mind being busy at all, but give me a manageable and realistic workload, damnit! This is one reason I want to transition more towards critical care.

    Anyway, to answer your question: it takes time to get it. Be more patient with yourself. Your experience sounds a lot like mine when I started and I am also a 2nd career nurse. It's not easy starting over, but the rewards are awaiting you. I now sit here very glad I got to where I am through perseverance and positive thinking, and you can too. Eventually you will get to the point where you will finally get it!


    Sent from my iPad using allnurses

  • Apr 26

    It's too bad many nursing students and new grad nurses scoff at the idea of working on med/surg as their first job, desiring instead more luxurious (for lack of a better word) specialties such as NICU or some other critical care. I fell onto a medicine floor just for the sake of having a job right out of school in this economy. Granted, I know I won't be on this unit forever, but for the time being I am learning so much, my foundation will be strong for whatever I choose to do thereafter.


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