Latest Comments by *LadyJane*

Latest Comments by *LadyJane*

*LadyJane*, ADN 6,149 Views

Joined May 1, '08 - from 'Beautiful PNW'. *LadyJane* is a RN. She has '3' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'LTC'. Posts: 288 (45% Liked) Likes: 273

Sorted By Last Comment (Past 5 Years)
  • 0

    Smells. The kryptonite is a toss up between two smells. One, colostomies, two, a blend of feces coupled with stinky, infected pressure sore at the coccyx. The latter, which I wasn't expecting, in my first year, was so bad, I had to step away because my mouth started watering and stomack started crapmping (which herald vomit about to happen). I didn't vomit, but had to get a mask with some scented something. That whole experience coupled with my first in-person experience with a cavernous wound, big enough to stuff a tennis ball into, was just too much for my young nurse senses to process.

  • 1
    BloggerNurse likes this.

    Hearst review. After this class I was much more confident. Also our tests in our nursing program were HARD. NCLEX was easy compared to them!

  • 1
    annie.rn likes this.

    Patients/residents yelling. Daily occurance, very disruptive.

  • 0

    I was working with another nurse on a slow night and so we were going around together. we walked into a room, to burp a colostomy bag. I had never done this.

    when she let the gas out, I had to leave the room. I have smelled some awful stenches before, including being sprayed by a skunk, but this beat all. I thought I'd vomit right then and there. Can anything be done, other than avoiding certain foods? Do the bag deodorants really work?

  • 0

    25/26 per hour is typical pay for an RN in LTC.

  • 1
    systoly likes this.

    I find that the family member wants to know some details, like was s/he sleeping/comfortable/well-medicated, etc. as reassurance that they had a peaceful death. I expect them to ask that, and to tell them. I also use "passed away", just because it seems kinder to the family than "died". They are also of the age group that this is the term that they use.

  • 0

    I imagine the wife would be upset, but she also needs to realize that her husband is not able to remember what he ate for breakfast, either. Demented residents need protection, but what are we proteting against? The wife's feelings, or the husband's momentary(?) comfort at holding hands with a female resident.

    Also, in that "horrific scene", were they naked? what exactly was going on? sexual intercourse? Bondage? Beating? Kissing andhugging?

  • 1
    tayloramaRN2be likes this.

    From Bloomberg news:
    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-07-22/boomer-sex-with-dementia-foreshadowed-in-nursing-home.html>



    Dementia residents have sexual contact, legal can of worms opened, DNS and Admin both lose licenses.....

    As a newish nurse in LT care, what isthe main thing to prevent this, besides knowing yourresidents well, and keeping a close eye on them all?

  • 0

    Uniform Advantage Butter soft scrubs. Very good prices, the fit is fine and the fabric is good quality, endures lots of washing and still looks very tidy/professional. Needs minimal steaming out of the dryer. I also like white swan, I like the heavier fabrics and choice of more professional designs.

  • 0

    I am also a newish nurse, but I and my friends who work mainly in long term care have not found the backbiting thing where we work (3 different facilities). I have heard of such nastiness at the hospitals.... (shudder)

  • 11

    Well, if tickling with a cotton ball pulled out of a stock bottle of colace makes you furious, then I can only imagine how you'd seethe seeing a CNA take your mother to the bathroom, and then not wash her hands with hot soapy water for as long as it takes to sing "happy birthday to you", and then wheel her down to the dining room. Or for that matter, touch a doorknob or a surface that someone else touched after using the bathroom!

    I say for the sake and safety of your grandmother, bring her to your house, and take proper care of her! It's the only safe thing to do!

  • 9

    Uh, yeah.

    Nothing quite like an old fashioned circ to make you never want one of those on your kids, or babies of anyone you know, or for that matter, anyone. If the moms heard that baby's high-pitched screaming, she would have grabbed him back after the first hemostat was placed. Can you tell I think that they are barbaric? But that's just my opinion.

    They aren't so bad with anesthetic. But really, it's that human being's body. Let him make changes according to his desires.

  • 1
    Altra likes this.

    Where I have worked, only two rn's have signed. I suspect this story.

  • 1
    bbuerke likes this.

    Easy! No more cancer.

  • 3
    teeniebert, Esme12, and MrChicagoRN like this.

    Some patients may be trying to practice self-hypnosis, or trying to escape into a painless part of their mind. I have done this when a patient, post surgery. A nurse came up, put her hand on my forearm without saying anything, to see if I was awake, I opened my eyes and looked at her, so she asked me how I was doing. I said, a lot of pain! She was puzzled because I was so still. (I was so still, because I was trying not to breathe because it hurt so bad to breathe), and was excruciating to move in the slightest, so I was perfectly still.

    She would have thought I was resting quietly, except she put her hand on my arm, and asked me. Thank god she did. She called the doc, and got the PCA order turned up. God bless her!


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