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Joined Mar 14, '04 - from 'California, USA'. herring_RN is a retired registered nurse. She has '>40 years' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Critical care, tele, Medical-Surgical'. Posts: 16,830 (73% Liked) Likes: 33,037

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  • Jun 27

    Example, at a union hospital if someone gets injured at home (not a workmans comp issue) and has to take time off and does not have enough time to qualify for FMLA which requires 1 year with an employer, they can do so and have thier job waiting for them until they come back. Of course provided it was legit and verified by a doctor. Nonunion hospitals can and may fire a nurse who was injured off hospital grounds if it is in their best financial interest versus holding a job for an employee until they get better and are able to return to work. My contract includes this, taking as much as a 6-month leave for a medical problem if needed and coming back to your job. Who has that kind of protection these days? I think unionization should be way more common.

  • Jun 27

    Hello,

    I am wondering if anyone can shed some light on the current Kaiser SCNSC union in Southern California. I am hoping to transfer there within a year and want to see what nurses think about the contract. Seeking information about pay scale, vacation accural and retirement.

  • Jun 27

    Per the AllNurses TOS we cannot offer you medical advice. Please call your primary care provider regarding your medical question and ask about your work requirements of your employer.

  • Jun 27

    Not sure. I quit my job today and actually have peace and two interviews lined up. The good Lord will lead me to where He wants me to go.

  • Jun 27

    Quote from HonestyAlways
    I appreciate the responses and have taken action by reporting to the regulating entity. I knew in my heart what was right and I guess I just needed confirmation that I was doing what was in the best interest of the vulnerable parties involved. I am relieved to have this chapter in my career closed but am nervous about my future, of course. In the end I have done what is right and I will hang my hat on that.
    Thank you for doing right. Where will you go from here?

  • Jun 27

    Quote from HonestyAlways
    I appreciate the responses and have taken action by reporting to the regulating entity. I knew in my heart what was right and I guess I just needed confirmation that I was doing what was in the best interest of the vulnerable parties involved. I am relieved to have this chapter in my career closed but am nervous about my future, of course. In the end I have done what is right and I will hang my hat on that.
    Moral distress in nursing is all too common.

  • Jun 27

    I appreciate the responses and have taken action by reporting to the regulating entity. I knew in my heart what was right and I guess I just needed confirmation that I was doing what was in the best interest of the vulnerable parties involved. I am relieved to have this chapter in my career closed but am nervous about my future, of course. In the end I have done what is right and I will hang my hat on that.

  • Jun 27

    I have notified my Administrator and she has notified the owners, as well as the members of upper management. My Administrator is very concerned, of course. The owner of the company issued a response that is nonchalant and inaccurate, at best. The powers that be truly seem to not care about the severity of the situation and have been quite distant and not the least bit helpful in resolving the problem. Thank you so much for the advice and the information that you have provided.

  • Jun 27

    In most states, the Department of Health regulates Skilled Nursing Facilities, not board of nursing. Have you notified SNF administrator of these issues.... if they have not been concerned, there should be a corporate DON you should notify. It's not unusual for cash strapped corporations to be late paying bills, especially if reimbursement from Medicare/Medicaid late. If these persons appear unconcerned or hushing up issue, you can file a whistleblower complaint with Dept of Health or state Inspector General hotlines.

    Excellent advice here:
    Preparing to Blow the Whistle: A Survival Guide for Nurses - Medscape requires free registration

  • Jun 1

    Quote from SuperStaffer
    If you want to join an evil organization that has had a good idea perverted than defiantly join a union. You won't have to work much, you can be lazy, make mistakes, generally lower your standards overall, be known as a member of a buying organization and looked down on by management and many other peers.

    If you want to be your own person and maintain your own responsibility than non-union. I left a hospital because unions were being let in the door. I have had too much experience with the ugly organizations. At their inception they were a good idea but like so many things they have been perverted over time.
    Sorry to hear ur bad experience.
    Buy why the Blanket statement?
    As we all know:
    NOT ALL Nurses, Doctors, Hospitals, Cops & Judges are created equal, NOT even your own family members are created equal.

    Do you see the pattern here?
    Do you see the point that im trying to make?

    & certainly NOT ALL Unions are created equal.

    Pls no blanket statements.

    Such statements will just make you sound narrow minded & ignorant (no disrespect)

    Yes, there are AWFUL Unions out there, but dont forget there are also WONDERFUL unions out there too.
    Some of these AWSOME unions organized to pass patient-to-nurse safety ratios (like in CA)

    CA ICU by law are STRICKLY ONLY 2 patients to 1 RN.
    But in Florida, no such law exist because the nurses or the voters were unsuccessful, cant, wont or unable to get together & make patient/nurse safety related changes such us the RN's & voters in CA.

    It definitely doesn't help if u live in a RED STATE where majority of the population are herded like cattles to a certain Point of View.
    It begs the question, would you rather be an ICU patient in CA or FL?
    2nd question, why the heck would you vote for politicians that are against your best interest?

    All I can say is...May God help those ICU patients in FL, where sometimes the FL RN get's 3or4 patients total! (Yikes!) Super scary & Super unsafe!

  • May 24

    I once went to a conference for OR and PACU nurses. I work in ICU, but am interested in moving to one of those areas in the future. I quickly noticed that at 40, I was one of the younger people there.
    There are a few lifelong night shift older nurses in med surg and ICU. Night shift tends to be less visible to people. As someone else mentioned, procedural nursing like VIR and GI procedures tend to have older nurses. I am not sure about home health, but the hospice nurses who work with my Dad are all over 45.

  • May 24

    Quote from nutella
    From my observation of working as a nurse for more than 20 years and now moving towards the age of 50 I find that most nurses on high traffic/ high workload floors including med/surg and all intermediate care units tend to be of a younger age as you have already observed.
    It seems to change when you look at areas that are "less crazy" and offer better work conditions including critical care areas, PACUs, intervention areas.
    In the major teaching hospitals, older nurses also gravitated towards the night shift if working on a medsurg or stepdown floor.

    Why is this happening?
    First of all, many nurses used to move towards shifts that would accommodate their family /family planning better and that used to be night shifts for many or evenings etc. - a lot of them like their arrangement and do not wish to go back to the busier day shifts.
    Secondly, some nurses plainly drop out of the hospital once they have family because they are looking for something that fits their lifestyle better.
    Thirdly, we are not getting younger....
    Fourthly, you discover that the hospital is not the "holy grail" and look into other options that do not require nights and weekends - which tends to be not the hospital environment unless you have a special position or agreement.

    I can say that when I got older and got past 35 I noticed that I felt less energetic but also less likely to put up and accept bad working conditions. I became more critical of the way management treats their nurses and asked questions pertaining to how quality of care, workload/support/staffing, and health/satisfaction of myself interfaces. Once it became more important for me to have a job that enables me to do my best work/ quality instead of just pushing the numbers of admissions and discharges on the busy floors with constant running/multitasking/ punitive hospital culture/ unhealthy working climate I took action.
    It became less important for me to put the "big names" on my resume because by that time I had already enough work experience in different areas of "big name" hospitals and instead focused on what is important to me now. I also was in the position to take a risk with starting a new job. For some nurses it is more important to suffer through the status quo because they depend on the specific job due to money or arrangements. For me it was more important not to get burned out by the giant churning machine...

    It seems that most nurses who want to keep their sanity look to leave the bedside after a few years - favorite places are case management, management (if one is inclined to move over to the dark side..), administration, areas with less patients to take like critical care/PACU....
    For a while, home care was also very popular but now it is basically the same craziness as hospital nursing - only that your trunk is full of supplies, you drive around and see one patient at a time. The documentation requirements are crazy.
    I completely agree. While working in the hospital I saw I was one of the oldest around. And my body told me the same thing. I left to do non acute psych.

  • May 24

    Quote from poopylala
    Where have all the older nurses gone?
    Isn't that an old Peter, Paul, and Mary Song?

    flowers-png

  • May 24

    Quote from poopylala
    I notice that most nurses now are younger rather than older (less than 35 years old). Where have all the older nurses gone? Do they tend to work in certain units at your hospital or work in clinics?

    From my observation of working as a nurse for more than 20 years and now moving towards the age of 50 I find that most nurses on high traffic/ high workload floors including med/surg and all intermediate care units tend to be of a younger age as you have already observed.

    It seems to change when you look at areas that are "less crazy" and offer better work conditions including critical care areas, PACUs, intervention areas.
    In the major teaching hospitals, older nurses also gravitated towards the night shift if working on a medsurg or stepdown floor.

    Why is this happening?

    First of all, many nurses used to move towards shifts that would accommodate their family /family planning better and that used to be night shifts for many or evenings etc. - a lot of them like their arrangement and do not wish to go back to the busier day shifts.

    Secondly, some nurses plainly drop out of the hospital once they have family because they are looking for something that fits their lifestyle better.
    Thirdly, we are not getting younger....

    Fourthly, you discover that the hospital is not the "holy grail" and look into other options that do not require nights and weekends - which tends to be not the hospital environment unless you have a special position or agreement.

    I can say that when I got older and got past 35 I noticed that I felt less energetic but also less likely to put up and accept bad working conditions. I became more critical of the way management treats their nurses and asked questions pertaining to how quality of care, workload/support/staffing, and health/satisfaction of myself interfaces. Once it became more important for me to have a job that enables me to do my best work/ quality instead of just pushing the numbers of admissions and discharges on the busy floors with constant running/multitasking/ punitive hospital culture/ unhealthy working climate I took action.

    It became less important for me to put the "big names" on my resume because by that time I had already enough work experience in different areas of "big name" hospitals and instead focused on what is important to me now. I also was in the position to take a risk with starting a new job. For some nurses it is more important to suffer through the status quo because they depend on the specific job due to money or arrangements. For me it was more important not to get burned out by the giant churning machine...

    It seems that most nurses who want to keep their sanity look to leave the bedside after a few years - favorite places are case management, management (if one is inclined to move over to the dark side..), administration, areas with less patients to take like critical care/PACU....

    For a while, home care was also very popular but now it is basically the same craziness as hospital nursing - only that your trunk is full of supplies, you drive around and see one patient at a time. The documentation requirements are crazy.

  • May 16

    I took the 8-week MBSR course last year and it was a game changer in helping me deal with long-standing issues related to anxiety and depression. By the time I took the class my work-related/nurse role-related anxiety (coupled with some significant personal losses and setbacks) had reached an untenable pitch. Mindfulness practice has not made me impervious to stress or discouragement, but it has made me more resilient - able to move back to an okay place far quicker and easier.

    For me, it's about bringing moments of mindfulness into my every-day experience. It's wonderfully simple and really doesn't require you to change anything external in your life. You increase the aggregate of "being okay" moments and over time you find that your set-point has subtlely shifted to a happier place.

    Some hospitals actually offer the course to employees. If it's not offered directly by your hospital/employer, you might be able to use your health plan's Wellness initiative benefit to offset the cost of taking a course from a local college or therapist.


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