Content That herring_RN Likes

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herring_RN Guide 44,355 Views

Joined Mar 14, '04 - from 'California, USA'. herring_RN is a retired registered nurse. She has '>40 years' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Critical care, tele, Medical-Surgical'. Posts: 15,629 (72% Liked) Likes: 29,397

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  • Jun 25

    Quote from heron
    So, insurance companies are bad. I agree, which is one of the reasons I want to have a single payer system.

    I note with interest that you never addressed Muno's posts on the math or explained how an HSA would work for someone who barely makes enough to cover basic expenses. Is that where the million dollar give-away comes in? What happens when the million runs out. Just die, already?

    I don't think you have a clue what you're talking about.
    So say we all.

  • Jun 24
  • Jun 23

    In my experience, salary numbers reported to the media come from the employer, and they often include payroll taxes, any $$ paid toward insurance premiums, which can inflate the look of compensation.

  • Jun 23

    These Nurses were offered 1% cost of living raise over 3 years not per year. Inflation in Boston is up 1.5% from last year so the new contract should have at least 1.5% per year cost of living increase. They are asking for 4% over 18mo which makes sense if their previous cost of living raises didn't match reality. When inflation goes up and your employer doesn't match it, thats called cutting your wages. It might be difficult for people to understand how the world works but that hospital is going to raise its prices to match inflation, they are going to have more income as a result. These Nurses just want the fair and ethical treatment that can only be achieved by a strong Union. Greed isn't in the picture.

    Corporations used to enslave the American people in the early 1900s, child labor, factory stores, unsafe conditions. Unions are how we created a middle class. Unions are what make this country great. Unions are how the 1st amendment allows for us to protect our basic freedoms and livelihoods.

  • Jun 23

    Boston as a whole is 60% above the national average cost of living.
    Boston as a whole is 50% above the national median income. (proportionally more of that goes to taxes)
    The neighborhood around Brigham (Brookline) has a median income of $110K.
    RNs typically make more than the median income.
    So maybe they are underpaid...

  • Jun 23

    Oh CTICU? Cardiothoracic stepdown? Oh HELLNAW. Those are my people, and some really complicated stepdown patients attached to every line known to man- pressors, heparin, insulin, chest tubes, NG tubes/ G and/or J tubes, epidurals, PCAs, cardiac monitors, antibiotics, Woundvac, pacer wires, JP drains, Foleys, sure I forgot some.

    They need to get all the money they can!

  • Jun 23

    Quote from Julius Seizure
    So nurses shouldn't want to bargain for more compensation? Their only concern should be patient safety?

    It sounds like perhaps you feel that the nurses should be willing to work for pennies...as long as the patients are safe.

    Any other industry, it's understood that you would like to negotiate the best salary for your work that you can get. But shame on nurses for doing it?
    This. No one bats an eye at the exorbitant salaries commonplace in other professions (pro athletes, entertainers), but nurses are supposed to work for the good of mankind and that should be enough??? Nah...I have bills to pay, mouths to feed, and student loans to repay. It's also nice to take a vacation once in a while.
    FWIW-I live in a suburb of Boston. It's not a fancy, wealthy town, but a decent middle class town. Average home price is over $500,000 and rents are about 900-1000 a month for a one bed room apartment. $100,000 a year is not living the glamorous life in Boston.

  • Jun 22

    So nurses shouldn't want to bargain for more compensation? Their only concern should be patient safety?

    It sounds like perhaps you feel that the nurses should be willing to work for pennies...as long as the patients are safe.

    Any other industry, it's understood that you would like to negotiate the best salary for your work that you can get. But shame on nurses for doing it?

  • Jun 22

    Good for them to strike...wage suppression is real, and the wage and status of rich people pushing out well-earning middle wagers IS happening; I can not even get into a lot of the neighborhoods that have TRIPLED property values while others who make far more have tax abatemnts-NOT right at all.

    A junior executive can make 650 k and TRIPLE their salary if they suppress labor costs, along with 20 percent stock match and additional stock options (FAR better than my paltry 3 percent match to my 10 percent contribution); this person can live where hue want, vacation time without struggle, and sit at the top while pts are angry at the system that THEY created and ignore our end-user solutions.

    I have great credit and make 75k in my market; if I made more so I could have a great place to live with less crime, great schools while having safe ratios, better staffing for the benefit of my patients, and break down this broken system I'm ALL for it.

    I know OP is a troll, but sorry not sorry; I'm for economic justice, especially for those who want to change this corporate system.

  • Jun 22

    Quote from RockMay
    In this case it's about the greedy being greedier.
    And you know this how?

  • Jun 22

    I used to say "I'm reasonably compensated for what I do" but now that my body is damaged because of that work and I've been made disposable, I question that 4 years of decent income was worth sacrificing my physical wellbeing. And I make nowhere near 6 figures.

  • Jun 22

    Quote from RockMay
    Nope, I am *definitely not* a PA. You misread my post.
    RockMay, you posted this on March 9th: http://allnurses.com/nurse-practitio...ml#post8940131

    "I am about to graduate from PA school. We had two entire semesters where we had to learn how to read and interpret X-rays, CTs, MRIs, Ultrasounds, PET scans, and combo PET/CTs. We were very thoroughly tested on these skills, with an emphasis on X-rays for diagnosing pneumonia, CHF, pneumothorax, aspirations, abdominal xrays for small and large bowel obstructions, KUBs, and musculoskeletel xrays. We were absolutely required to know how to tell the difference between a Salter-Harris Type 2 (most common) and Salter-Harris Type 5 (most devastating). To read that the NP curriculum does not include basic chest/abdominal/musculoskeletel xrays makes me extremely concerned. While there is a radiologist available to read Xrays that usually doesn't happen until the next day. If an NP had a patient with fever + cough and can't interpret an xray then the PT may be sent home without the right (or any) treatment. What's the benefit of ordering a CXR if you can't interpret it? That is medical negligence and a lawsuit waiting to happen. If you can't interpret a basic chest xray then you have no business treating any patient with any sort of cough as you can't tell the difference between pneumonia or a Kerley B line."

    So I'm guessing you didn't graduate from PA school and that's why you're *definitely not* a PA?

  • Jun 22

    As a professional that lives in Boston proper, you cannot just look at salary - currently a one bedroom apartment for rent is market price at around 1700 in the outskirts of Brighton, one of the more affordable neighborhoods in Boston. When you start talking about a 2,3 Bedroom, costs are well over $2000. And while buying may be slightly more cost effective, 1-2 bedroom condos go for over 300,000 in the area or more.

  • Jun 22

    They are striking for safety reasons! This isn't about the money. Smh.

  • Jun 22

    Quote from RockMay
    And people wonder why there is so little sympathy for RNs who are striking and complain they aren't paid enough. They are literally in the top 5% of the earners in the country.
    boston is very expensive to live in...or near...


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