Latest Likes For herring_RN

herring_RN Guide 93,984 Views

Joined: Mar 14, '04; Posts: 17,570 (73% Liked) ; Likes: 35,929

Sorted By Last Like Received (Max 500)
  • May 14

    If ordered to go to lunch I would ask, "Who will take over my patient(s) while I'm at lunch?"
    If there is no one I would say, "I would if I could, but I cannot abandon my patient.'
    If ordered to i would ask with other staff to witness, "Are you ordering me to leave my patients without an assigned nurse?"
    Sometimes they then understand that they are ordering you to violate the Nursing Practice Act and the law.

    Here is an examples of a hospital fined after a patient was harmed due to ratio violations:
    Palomar Medical Center (PDF
    )
    555 E. Valley Parkway, Escondino, CA 820211, San Diego County - The hospital failed to ensure the health and safety of a patient when it did not follow its patient care policies and procedures. This is the first administrative penalty issued to this hospital. The penalty is assessed at $50,000.

    The statement of Deficiency is in the column on the left. The right side has the required Plan of Correction.

    Generally unless a patient is harmed there is no fine. The hospital must provide an acceptable Plan of Correction.

  • May 14

    I'm sorry this is happening to you.
    At the start of each shift that is not safe document in writing exactly what the situation is and give a copy to your manager or shift supervisor. If your union provides an "Assignment Despite Objection" (ADO) or "Disclaimer" use that and keep a copy. If you don't have a form use paper. Write, "In our professional judgment this assignment is unsafe because the facility failed to provide sufficient staff. As a result the facility is responsible for any adverse effects on patient care.
    Write details on the one given to management.

    Here is an ADO from the Washington State Nurses Association. California does not have it on line:
    http://www.wsna.org/labor/ado/documents/ADO.pdf

    It is not a HIPAA violation to provide information to hospital management or to a regulatory agency.
    Write an exact quote of what you were told and the name of the manager or supervisor. The date, time, location, number of nurses, number of patients, and room numbers of patients should be written on the form or paper.

    If something happens remember the name of the patient and the room number. Don't write it anywhere and don't look at the chart when you are not assigned to that patient.

    That form can be used in court or a disciplinary hearing. It is best for all nurses on the shift to sign it, but do it alone if they won't.
    It can save your license, your job, and protect you in the event of a malpractice lawsuit.

    I'll type the text of a flyer on reporting to the state:

    HOW TO COMPLAIN TO THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH

    INTRODUCTION:
    The Department of Public Health (Licensing and Certification Division) is the agency that determines the compliance of health facilities with state and federal laws, rules, and regulations. To accomplish this goal, the Department conducts periodic inspections of health care facilities and is empowered to take remedial action. Such remedial action may involve suspension of licensure, curtailment of public funding, and other enforcement actions. More frequently, the Department will cite the facility for a violation and request an acceptable plan of correction.
    Reports on the result of each inspection of a hospital along with the plan of action and hospital comments are kept on file in the department. All inspection records, lists of deficiencies, and plans of correction are open to public inspection.
    THE COMPLAINT:
    1. Anyone can file a complaint: RN, patient, family member, others.
    2. Avoid anonymous complaints. The whistle blower protection laws in long term and acute facilities provide protection against retaliation. Speak to your labor rep first about the problem. Go through the PPC or other facility-based structure. These avenues are often effective in resolving patient safety problems.
    3. File the written complaint with the local DPH field office & notify CNA.
    A. The DHS evaluator will be best able to investigate the complaint if provided the following:

    • Name and address of the facility.
    • Date, time, and location (unit or room number). Name(s) or medical record # of patient(s) involved. Names of involved staff.
    • Staffing assignment sheets if available.
    • Description of incident with quote from Title 22 (include number of section).
    • Desired remedy IE “Nurse staffing must meet or exceed established ratios at all times.”
    • Ask for implementation not just improved documentation.

    4. The Department will conduct a complaint investigation.
    5. The person signing the complaint will be contacted prior to the investigation of the complaint and also will be informed of the Departments findings upon conclusion of the investigation.
    Find your local district office and mail your complaint there:
    District Offices

    This section of hospital licensing law outlines the responsibilities of an RN. It makes it clear that every patient must be assigned to a registered nurse:
    https://govt.westlaw.com/calregs/Doc...8sc.Default%29

    The ICU ratio since 1976 is here:
    https://govt.westlaw.com/calregs/Doc...8sc.Default%29

    The "new" section with competency, orientation, and staffing requirements:
    https://govt.westlaw.com/calregs/Doc...8sc.Default%29

    Feel free to send a PM and I'll try to help.

  • May 14

    I'm sorry this is happening to you.
    At the start of each shift that is not safe document in writing exactly what the situation is and give a copy to your manager or shift supervisor. If your union provides an "Assignment Despite Objection" (ADO) or "Disclaimer" use that and keep a copy. If you don't have a form use paper. Write, "In our professional judgment this assignment is unsafe because the facility failed to provide sufficient staff. As a result the facility is responsible for any adverse effects on patient care.
    Write details on the one given to management.

    Here is an ADO from the Washington State Nurses Association. California does not have it on line:
    http://www.wsna.org/labor/ado/documents/ADO.pdf

    It is not a HIPAA violation to provide information to hospital management or to a regulatory agency.
    Write an exact quote of what you were told and the name of the manager or supervisor. The date, time, location, number of nurses, number of patients, and room numbers of patients should be written on the form or paper.

    If something happens remember the name of the patient and the room number. Don't write it anywhere and don't look at the chart when you are not assigned to that patient.

    That form can be used in court or a disciplinary hearing. It is best for all nurses on the shift to sign it, but do it alone if they won't.
    It can save your license, your job, and protect you in the event of a malpractice lawsuit.

    I'll type the text of a flyer on reporting to the state:

    HOW TO COMPLAIN TO THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH

    INTRODUCTION:
    The Department of Public Health (Licensing and Certification Division) is the agency that determines the compliance of health facilities with state and federal laws, rules, and regulations. To accomplish this goal, the Department conducts periodic inspections of health care facilities and is empowered to take remedial action. Such remedial action may involve suspension of licensure, curtailment of public funding, and other enforcement actions. More frequently, the Department will cite the facility for a violation and request an acceptable plan of correction.
    Reports on the result of each inspection of a hospital along with the plan of action and hospital comments are kept on file in the department. All inspection records, lists of deficiencies, and plans of correction are open to public inspection.
    THE COMPLAINT:
    1. Anyone can file a complaint: RN, patient, family member, others.
    2. Avoid anonymous complaints. The whistle blower protection laws in long term and acute facilities provide protection against retaliation. Speak to your labor rep first about the problem. Go through the PPC or other facility-based structure. These avenues are often effective in resolving patient safety problems.
    3. File the written complaint with the local DPH field office & notify CNA.
    A. The DHS evaluator will be best able to investigate the complaint if provided the following:

    • Name and address of the facility.
    • Date, time, and location (unit or room number). Name(s) or medical record # of patient(s) involved. Names of involved staff.
    • Staffing assignment sheets if available.
    • Description of incident with quote from Title 22 (include number of section).
    • Desired remedy IE “Nurse staffing must meet or exceed established ratios at all times.”
    • Ask for implementation not just improved documentation.

    4. The Department will conduct a complaint investigation.
    5. The person signing the complaint will be contacted prior to the investigation of the complaint and also will be informed of the Departments findings upon conclusion of the investigation.
    Find your local district office and mail your complaint there:
    District Offices

    This section of hospital licensing law outlines the responsibilities of an RN. It makes it clear that every patient must be assigned to a registered nurse:
    https://govt.westlaw.com/calregs/Doc...8sc.Default%29

    The ICU ratio since 1976 is here:
    https://govt.westlaw.com/calregs/Doc...8sc.Default%29

    The "new" section with competency, orientation, and staffing requirements:
    https://govt.westlaw.com/calregs/Doc...8sc.Default%29

    Feel free to send a PM and I'll try to help.

  • May 14

    Here is a Nurse Alert explaining a lot about how to advocate for your patients and the profession of nursing:
    http://www.nationalnursesunited.org/...nsemar2309.pdf

  • May 14

    Quote from morte
    find out what law firm represents the hospital in liability issues, have the union start with them. Of course, it should have been reported the first time that it happened..... I know, easier said than done.
    I remember being told that an orthopedic unit was horribly under staffed. one of the nursing assistants filled out an incident report because the nurses could not administer pain medication in a timely manner. She sent the hospital attorney an incident report, a copy of the staffing sheet showing nurses assigned up to 12 patients when the ratio at the time was five or fewer patients per nurse, and a written description of how it distressed her to see patients suffer.
    The next shift the attorney and upper management were on the unit. That is a great idea, that I'd forgotten about.

  • May 14

    If ordered to go to lunch I would ask, "Who will take over my patient(s) while I'm at lunch?"
    If there is no one I would say, "I would if I could, but I cannot abandon my patient.'
    If ordered to i would ask with other staff to witness, "Are you ordering me to leave my patients without an assigned nurse?"
    Sometimes they then understand that they are ordering you to violate the Nursing Practice Act and the law.

    Here is an examples of a hospital fined after a patient was harmed due to ratio violations:
    Palomar Medical Center (PDF
    )
    555 E. Valley Parkway, Escondino, CA 820211, San Diego County - The hospital failed to ensure the health and safety of a patient when it did not follow its patient care policies and procedures. This is the first administrative penalty issued to this hospital. The penalty is assessed at $50,000.

    The statement of Deficiency is in the column on the left. The right side has the required Plan of Correction.

    Generally unless a patient is harmed there is no fine. The hospital must provide an acceptable Plan of Correction.

  • May 14

    I'm sorry this is happening to you.
    At the start of each shift that is not safe document in writing exactly what the situation is and give a copy to your manager or shift supervisor. If your union provides an "Assignment Despite Objection" (ADO) or "Disclaimer" use that and keep a copy. If you don't have a form use paper. Write, "In our professional judgment this assignment is unsafe because the facility failed to provide sufficient staff. As a result the facility is responsible for any adverse effects on patient care.
    Write details on the one given to management.

    Here is an ADO from the Washington State Nurses Association. California does not have it on line:
    http://www.wsna.org/labor/ado/documents/ADO.pdf

    It is not a HIPAA violation to provide information to hospital management or to a regulatory agency.
    Write an exact quote of what you were told and the name of the manager or supervisor. The date, time, location, number of nurses, number of patients, and room numbers of patients should be written on the form or paper.

    If something happens remember the name of the patient and the room number. Don't write it anywhere and don't look at the chart when you are not assigned to that patient.

    That form can be used in court or a disciplinary hearing. It is best for all nurses on the shift to sign it, but do it alone if they won't.
    It can save your license, your job, and protect you in the event of a malpractice lawsuit.

    I'll type the text of a flyer on reporting to the state:

    HOW TO COMPLAIN TO THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH

    INTRODUCTION:
    The Department of Public Health (Licensing and Certification Division) is the agency that determines the compliance of health facilities with state and federal laws, rules, and regulations. To accomplish this goal, the Department conducts periodic inspections of health care facilities and is empowered to take remedial action. Such remedial action may involve suspension of licensure, curtailment of public funding, and other enforcement actions. More frequently, the Department will cite the facility for a violation and request an acceptable plan of correction.
    Reports on the result of each inspection of a hospital along with the plan of action and hospital comments are kept on file in the department. All inspection records, lists of deficiencies, and plans of correction are open to public inspection.
    THE COMPLAINT:
    1. Anyone can file a complaint: RN, patient, family member, others.
    2. Avoid anonymous complaints. The whistle blower protection laws in long term and acute facilities provide protection against retaliation. Speak to your labor rep first about the problem. Go through the PPC or other facility-based structure. These avenues are often effective in resolving patient safety problems.
    3. File the written complaint with the local DPH field office & notify CNA.
    A. The DHS evaluator will be best able to investigate the complaint if provided the following:

    • Name and address of the facility.
    • Date, time, and location (unit or room number). Name(s) or medical record # of patient(s) involved. Names of involved staff.
    • Staffing assignment sheets if available.
    • Description of incident with quote from Title 22 (include number of section).
    • Desired remedy IE “Nurse staffing must meet or exceed established ratios at all times.”
    • Ask for implementation not just improved documentation.

    4. The Department will conduct a complaint investigation.
    5. The person signing the complaint will be contacted prior to the investigation of the complaint and also will be informed of the Departments findings upon conclusion of the investigation.
    Find your local district office and mail your complaint there:
    District Offices

    This section of hospital licensing law outlines the responsibilities of an RN. It makes it clear that every patient must be assigned to a registered nurse:
    https://govt.westlaw.com/calregs/Doc...8sc.Default%29

    The ICU ratio since 1976 is here:
    https://govt.westlaw.com/calregs/Doc...8sc.Default%29

    The "new" section with competency, orientation, and staffing requirements:
    https://govt.westlaw.com/calregs/Doc...8sc.Default%29

    Feel free to send a PM and I'll try to help.

  • Apr 28

    U.S. Has The Worst Rate Of Maternal Deaths In The Developed World

    NPR and ProPublica teamed up for a six-month long investigation on maternal mortality in the U.S. Among our key findings:

    • More American women are dying of pregnancy-related complications than any other developed country. Only in the U.S. has the rate of women who die been rising.
    • There's a hodgepodge of hospital protocols for dealing with potentially fatal complications, allowing for treatable complications to become lethal.
    • Hospitals - including those with intensive care units for newborns - can be woefully unprepared for a maternal emergency.
    • Federal and state funding show only 6 percent of block grants for "maternal and child health" actually go to the health of mothers.
    • In the U.S, some doctors entering the growing specialty of maternal-fetal medicine were able to complete that training without ever spending time in a labor-delivery unit.

    U.S. Has The Worst Rate of Maternal Deaths In The Developed World : NPR

  • Apr 21

    U.S. Has The Worst Rate Of Maternal Deaths In The Developed World

    NPR and ProPublica teamed up for a six-month long investigation on maternal mortality in the U.S. Among our key findings:

    • More American women are dying of pregnancy-related complications than any other developed country. Only in the U.S. has the rate of women who die been rising.
    • There's a hodgepodge of hospital protocols for dealing with potentially fatal complications, allowing for treatable complications to become lethal.
    • Hospitals - including those with intensive care units for newborns - can be woefully unprepared for a maternal emergency.
    • Federal and state funding show only 6 percent of block grants for "maternal and child health" actually go to the health of mothers.
    • In the U.S, some doctors entering the growing specialty of maternal-fetal medicine were able to complete that training without ever spending time in a labor-delivery unit.

    U.S. Has The Worst Rate of Maternal Deaths In The Developed World : NPR

  • Apr 15

    About half of Americans support single-payer health care
    By Emily Guskin April 12, 2018
    A Washington Post-Kaiser Family Foundation poll finds a 51 percent majority of Americans support a national health plan, also known as a single-payer plan, while 43 percent oppose it....

    ... Nearly three-quarters of Democrats support a single-payer health plan (74 percent), while a slightly larger share of Republicans oppose it (80 percent). Independents break the tie, supporting a government-run health-care plan by 54 percent to 40 percent.

    Almost three-quarters of Democrats support single-payer, along with over half of independents
    Q: Do you support or oppose having a national health plan -- or a single-payer plan -- in which all Americans would get their insurance from a single government plan?...

    About half of Americans support single-payer health care - The Washington Post

  • Apr 15

    Public support for ‘single payer’ health coverage grows
    JUNE 23, 2017
    Currently, 60% say the federal government is responsible for ensuring health care coverage for all Americans, while 39% say this is not the government’s responsibility. These views are unchanged from January, but the share saying health coverage is a government responsibility remains at its highest level in nearly a decade.
    Among those who see a government responsibility to provide health coverage for all, more now say it should be provided through a single health insurance system run by the government, rather than through a mix of private companies and government programs. Overall, 33% of the public now favors such a “single payer” approach to health insurance, up 5 percentage points since January and 12 points since 2014.
    Democrats – especially liberal Democrats – are much more supportive of this approach than they were even at the start of this year...

    Support for single-payer health insurance grows in U.S. | Pew Research Center

    The numbers:

    PEW RESEARCH CENTER SUMMER 2017 POLITICAL LANDSCAPE SURVEY http://assets.pewresearch.org/wp-con...re_topline.pdf
    What do health insurance corporations do better than Medicare that makes their executive and shareholder compensation worth it?
    As was stated that doesn't even take into account whet providers have to pay to deal with so many different plans.

  • Apr 9

    Quote from AceOfHearts<3
    The MA chapter of ANA is opposing it! So is the Organizations of Nurse Leaders.


    "Amanda Stefancyk Oberlies, CEO of the Organization of Nurse Leaders, stated, "Make no mistake: this proposal threatens the high quality of care we provide patients. It will force many hospitals to reduce critical services and will dramatically increase emergency room wait times. This measure will prevent nurses and doctors from being able to use their best judgment in times of crisis."[6]"

    It will INCREASE the quality of care. Five patients as a tele nurse was too much most of the time, especially with the high acuity many of them were. Heck, even 2 patients as an ICU nurse is too much if one is really critical.
    That quote is included here:
    Massachusetts Nurse-Patient Assignment Limits Initiative (218) - Ballotpedia

    Also the ratios and text of the initiative.

  • Apr 9

    This "leader" is just plain wrong. There have been MANY scientific studies demonstrating that safe staffing ratios save lives.
    It is dishonest and harmful to patients who die due ti failure-to-rescue. The profession of nursing is considered the most honest of occupations.
    Any nurse who denies the importance of sufficient nurse staffing is hinderingv the profession of nursing.

    "Massachusetts has some of the best hospitals in the country. Make no mistake: this proposal threatens the high quality of care we provide patients," said Amanda Stefancyk Oberlies, CEO of the Organization of Nurse Leaders. "It will force many hospitals to reduce critical services and will dramatically increase emergency room wait times.
    This measure will prevent nurses and doctors from being able to use their best judgment in times of crisis. Further, there are no scientific studies or reports that demonstrate the effectiveness of this one-size-fits-all staffing requirement improving quality of care."...
    Coalition to Protect Patient Safety Launches 218 Ballot Question Opposition Effort - Coalition to Protect Patient Safety
    By it's opposition the ANA is violating it's own resolution:
    In 2012 the ANA stated, "The nurse staffing resolution identifies short-staffing as a top concern for direct care nurses that negatively affects patient care and nurse job satisfaction. It notes that staffing decisions remain largely outside of nurses' control, and that staffing plans lack enforcement mechanisms.
    The resolution requests ANA to "reaffirm its dedication" to advocating for a staffing process, directed by nurses, that is enforceable and that includes staffing principles, minimum nurse-to-patient ratios, data collection, and penalties for non-compliance in all health care settings where staffing is a challenge".
    OOPS!
    * JAMA surg June 2016
    Hospitals with better nursing environments and above-average staffing levels were associated with better value (lower mortality with similar costs) compared with hospitals without nursing environment recognition and with below-average staffing
    Comparison of the Value of Nursing Work Environments in Hospitals Across Different Levels of Patient Risk | Nursing | JAMA Surgery | JAMA Network

    * Medical Care, November 2014
    The study findings provide support for the value of inpatient nurse staffing as it contributes to improvements in inpatient care; increases in staff number and skill mix lead to improved quality and reduced length of stay at no additional cost.
    Examining the value of inpatient nurse staffing: an assessment of quality and patient care costs. - PubMed - NCBI

    * Agency of Health Research and Quality, AHRQ Healthcare Innovations Exchange, Sept. 26, 2012.
    Higher nurse workloads are associated with more patient deaths, complications, and medical errors - "State Mandated Nurse Staffing Levels Alleviate Workloads, Leading to Lower Patient Mortality and Higher Nurse Satisfaction,"
    State-Mandated Nurse Staffing Levels Alleviate Workloads, Leading to Lower Patient Mortality and Higher Nurse Satisfaction | AHRQ Health Care Innovations Exchange

    * Medical Care Journal of the American Public Health Association: January 2013
    Improving nurses' work environments and staffing may be effective interventions for preventing readmissions. Each additional patient per nurse was associated with the risk of within 30 days of readmission for heart failure (7%), myocardial infarction (9%), and pneumonia (6%). "In all scenarios, the probability of patient readmission was reduced when nurse workloads were lower and nurse work environments were better."
    Hospital Nursing and 3-Day Readmissions among Medicare Patients with Heart Failure, Acute Myocardial Infarction, and Pneumonia

    * New England Journal of Medicine, March 17, 2011
    "Studies involving RN staffing have shown that when the nursing workload is high, nurses' surveillance of patients is impaired, and the risk of adverse events increases."
    "We estimate that the risk of death increased by 2% for each below-target shift and 4% for each high-turnover shift to which a patient was exposed."
    NEJM - Error

    If Pennsylvania and New Jersey matched California state-mandated ratios in medical and surgical units, New Jersey hospitals would have 13.9 percent fewer patient deaths and Pennsylvania 10.6 percent fewer deaths.
    * Health Services Research, August 2010
    The researchers surveyed 22,336 RNs in California and two comparable states, Pennsylvania and New Jersey, with striking results, including: if they matched California state-mandated ratios in medical and surgical units, New Jersey hospitals would have 13.9 percent fewer patient deaths and Pennsylvania 10.6 percent fewer deaths.
    "Because all hospitalized patients are likely to benefit from improved nurse staffing, not just general surgery patients, the potential number of lives that could be saved by improving nurse staffing in hospitals nationally is likely to be many thousands a year," according to Linda Aiken, the study's lead author. California RNs report having significantly more time to spend with patients, and their hospitals are far more likely to have enough RNs on staff to provide quality patient care. Fewer California RNs say their workload caused them to miss changes in patient conditions than New Jersey or Pennsylvania RNs
    https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/...3.2010.01114.x

    * Lancet Infectious Disease, July 2008
    This study finds that understaffing of nurses is a key factor in the spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the most dangerous type of hospital-acquired infection. The authors note that common attempts to prevent or contain MRSA and other types of infections such as requirements for regular and repeated hand washing by nurses are compromised when nursing staff are overburdened with too many patients.
    Overcrowding and understaffing in modern health-care systems: key determinants in meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission - ScienceDirect

    * Critical Care, July 19, 2007
    Understaffing of registered nurses in hospital intensive care units increases the risk of serious infections for patients; specifically late-onset ventilator-associated pneumonia, a preventable and potential deadly complication that can add thousands of dollars to the cost of care for hospital patients. Curtailing nurse staffing levels can lead to suboptimal care, which can raise costs far above the expense of employing more nurses
    Staffing Level: A Determinant of... (PDF Download Available)

    * Medical Care: Journal of the American Public Health Association, June 2007
    A review of outcomes for more than 15,000 patients in 51 U.S. hospital ICUs showed that those with higher nurse staffing levels had a lower incidence of infections, such as central line associated bloodstream infections, a common cause of death in intensive care settings. The study found that patients cared for in hospitals with higher staffing levels were 68 percent less likely to acquire an infection. Other measures such as ventilator-associated pneumonia and skin ulcers were also reduced in units with high staffing levels. Patients were also less likely to die within 30 days in these higher-staffed units.
    http://protectmasspatients.org/docs/...0Infection.pdf

    * Evidence Report/Technology Assessment for Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, May 2007
    A comprehensive analysis of all the scientific evidence linking RN staffing to patient care outcomes found consistent evidence that an increase in RN-to-patient ratios was associated with a reduction in hospital-related mortality, failure to rescue, and other nurse sensitive outcomes, as well as reduced length of stay.
    https://archive.ahrq.gov/downloads/p...nursestaff.pdf

    * Archives of Internal Medicine, Dec 2006
    A national study of the quality of care for patients hospitalized for heart attacks, congestive heart failure and pneumonia found that patients are more likely to receive high quality care in hospitals with higher registered nurse staffing ratios.
    https://massnurses.org/files/file/Le...tals_Study.pdf

    * Journal of Nursing Administration, Jan. 2006
    Increasing RN staffing increased patient satisfaction with pain management and physical care; while having more non-RN care "is related to decreased ability to rescue patients from medication errors."
    https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/1c0...8558fd5481.pdf

    * Cancer, Sept. 2005
    Patients undergoing common types of cancer surgery are safer in hospitals with higher RN-to-patient ratios. High RN-to-patient ratios were found to reduce the mortality rate by greater than 50% and smaller community hospitals that implement high RN ratios can provide a level of safety and quality of care for cancer patients on a par with much larger urban medical centers that specialize in performing similar types of surgery.
    https://www.massnurses.org/files/fil...d_Staffing.pdf

    * Nursing Research, March/April 2003
    Increasing nurse staffing by just one hour per patient day resulted in a 9% reduction in the incidence of hospital-acquired pneumonia. The cost of treating hospital-acquired pneumonia was up to $28,000 per patient. Patients who had pneumonia, wound infection or sepsis had a greater probability of death during hospitalization.
    http://www.nationalnursesunited.org/...-ADE-costs.pdf

  • Mar 30

    Of course you should know the policies and procedures of your unit.
    If asked I would tell the truth. Maybe that is why I was often not scheduled when they were expected.
    In my state the surveyors are experienced RNs. They often require a "Plan of Correction" (POC) for any violation. That is good to know as hospitals complying with the POC are safer and often better staffed.

  • Mar 30

    The Patient Safety Act: What the Bill Does
    It protects patients safety

    The Patient Safety Act:*What a Bill Does

    "How to get involved" for Massachusetts voters:
    The Coalition to Protect Massachusetts Patients


close