Latest Likes For herring_RN

herring_RN Guide 54,201 Views

Joined Mar 14, '04 - from 'California, USA'. herring_RN is a retired registered nurse. She has '>40 years' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Critical care, tele, Medical-Surgical'. Posts: 16,389 (72% Liked) Likes: 31,492

Sorted By Last Like Received (Max 500)
  • Dec 7

    There are many opportunities for a nurse to do good as a volunteer.

    Remote Area Medical (RAM) is a great organization providing health and dental care to people in the United States and other countries too.
    I've volunteered with them several times when they came to my city.
    Generally the first day licensed nurses do the intake the first day. For people wanting dental care the nurse helps determine whether the person is healthy enough to have dental work done. RNs are encouraged to teach in the short time allotted.
    I have seen more people with a toothache in one morning at RAM than in my entire previous life.

    We discover untreated diabetes, hypertension, and other illness. A nurse can do a lot of good.

    Here is their site: Home - Remote Area Medical

  • Nov 19

    I wish the ANA had included a goal of advocating for mandatory nurse-to-patient ratios for hospital and long term care (SNF) settings.
    this is from the ANA, but not included in the Strategic Plan:

    State staffing laws tend to fall into one of three general approaches:

    • The first is to require hospitals to have a nurse driven staffing committee which create staffing plans that reflect the needs of the patient population and match the skills and experience of the staff.
    • The second approach is for legislators to mandate specific nurse to patient ratios in legislation or regulation.
    • A third approach is requiring facilities to disclose staffing levels to the public and /or a regulatory body.

    The American Nurses Association (ANA) supports a legislative model in which nurses are empowered to create staffing plans specific to each unit. This approach aides in establishing staffing levels that are flexible and account for changes; including intensity of patient's needs, the number of admissions, discharges and transfers during a shift, level of experience of nursing staff, layout of the unit, and availability of resources (ancillary staff, technology etc.). Establishing minimum upwardly adjustable staffing levels is statute may also aide the committee in achieving safe and appropriate staffing plans.
    Nurse Staffing
    The ANA risks losing members because they are not focusing in safe staffing, which saves lives and prevents nurse burnout:
    New York, NY — October 26, 2012 — Nurses have voted by 91% to move forward and disaffiliate from the American Nurses Association.
    The nurses, members of the New York State Nurses Association, say they will focus on fighting for working nurses and their patients.
    Their number one focus is passing a New York law that would mandate safe nurse-to-patient ratios in hospitals.
    New York nurses vote 91% to move forward and leave the American Nurses Association - News & Events - Massachusetts Nurses Association

  • Nov 19

    There are many opportunities for a nurse to do good as a volunteer.

    Remote Area Medical (RAM) is a great organization providing health and dental care to people in the United States and other countries too.
    I've volunteered with them several times when they came to my city.
    Generally the first day licensed nurses do the intake the first day. For people wanting dental care the nurse helps determine whether the person is healthy enough to have dental work done. RNs are encouraged to teach in the short time allotted.
    I have seen more people with a toothache in one morning at RAM than in my entire previous life.

    We discover untreated diabetes, hypertension, and other illness. A nurse can do a lot of good.

    Here is their site: Home - Remote Area Medical

  • Nov 19

    There are many opportunities for a nurse to do good as a volunteer.

    Remote Area Medical (RAM) is a great organization providing health and dental care to people in the United States and other countries too.
    I've volunteered with them several times when they came to my city.
    Generally the first day licensed nurses do the intake the first day. For people wanting dental care the nurse helps determine whether the person is healthy enough to have dental work done. RNs are encouraged to teach in the short time allotted.
    I have seen more people with a toothache in one morning at RAM than in my entire previous life.

    We discover untreated diabetes, hypertension, and other illness. A nurse can do a lot of good.

    Here is their site: Home - Remote Area Medical

  • Nov 17

    There are many opportunities for a nurse to do good as a volunteer.

    Remote Area Medical (RAM) is a great organization providing health and dental care to people in the United States and other countries too.
    I've volunteered with them several times when they came to my city.
    Generally the first day licensed nurses do the intake the first day. For people wanting dental care the nurse helps determine whether the person is healthy enough to have dental work done. RNs are encouraged to teach in the short time allotted.
    I have seen more people with a toothache in one morning at RAM than in my entire previous life.

    We discover untreated diabetes, hypertension, and other illness. A nurse can do a lot of good.

    Here is their site: Home - Remote Area Medical

  • Nov 14

    Nurses worldwide have a proud history of political activism in advocating for our patients, public health, and the welfare of all people.

    In the United States the ANA has accomplished a lot:
    http://www.nursingworld.org/Function...icalReview.pdf

    Nurses achieved state registration and licensing to protect people from uneducated and untrained people holding themselves out a nurses. Only those with an RN, LPN/LVN are nurses under the law.
    Nurses were instrumental leaders in women getting the vote, stopping child labor, and public health.
    I am certain nurses will continue to work for the health of us all.

    Some may be interested in an event happening in D.C. this coming Thursday:
    First Broad Post-Election Rally – Thursday, DC Sen. Bernie Sanders to Join Day of Action | Common Dreams | Breaking News & Views for the Progressive Community

  • Nov 8

    I wish the ANA had included a goal of advocating for mandatory nurse-to-patient ratios for hospital and long term care (SNF) settings.
    this is from the ANA, but not included in the Strategic Plan:

    State staffing laws tend to fall into one of three general approaches:

    • The first is to require hospitals to have a nurse driven staffing committee which create staffing plans that reflect the needs of the patient population and match the skills and experience of the staff.
    • The second approach is for legislators to mandate specific nurse to patient ratios in legislation or regulation.
    • A third approach is requiring facilities to disclose staffing levels to the public and /or a regulatory body.

    The American Nurses Association (ANA) supports a legislative model in which nurses are empowered to create staffing plans specific to each unit. This approach aides in establishing staffing levels that are flexible and account for changes; including intensity of patient's needs, the number of admissions, discharges and transfers during a shift, level of experience of nursing staff, layout of the unit, and availability of resources (ancillary staff, technology etc.). Establishing minimum upwardly adjustable staffing levels is statute may also aide the committee in achieving safe and appropriate staffing plans.
    Nurse Staffing
    The ANA risks losing members because they are not focusing in safe staffing, which saves lives and prevents nurse burnout:
    New York, NY — October 26, 2012 — Nurses have voted by 91% to move forward and disaffiliate from the American Nurses Association.
    The nurses, members of the New York State Nurses Association, say they will focus on fighting for working nurses and their patients.
    Their number one focus is passing a New York law that would mandate safe nurse-to-patient ratios in hospitals.
    New York nurses vote 91% to move forward and leave the American Nurses Association - News & Events - Massachusetts Nurses Association

  • Nov 8

    I wish the ANA had included a goal of advocating for mandatory nurse-to-patient ratios for hospital and long term care (SNF) settings.
    this is from the ANA, but not included in the Strategic Plan:

    State staffing laws tend to fall into one of three general approaches:

    • The first is to require hospitals to have a nurse driven staffing committee which create staffing plans that reflect the needs of the patient population and match the skills and experience of the staff.
    • The second approach is for legislators to mandate specific nurse to patient ratios in legislation or regulation.
    • A third approach is requiring facilities to disclose staffing levels to the public and /or a regulatory body.

    The American Nurses Association (ANA) supports a legislative model in which nurses are empowered to create staffing plans specific to each unit. This approach aides in establishing staffing levels that are flexible and account for changes; including intensity of patient's needs, the number of admissions, discharges and transfers during a shift, level of experience of nursing staff, layout of the unit, and availability of resources (ancillary staff, technology etc.). Establishing minimum upwardly adjustable staffing levels is statute may also aide the committee in achieving safe and appropriate staffing plans.
    Nurse Staffing
    The ANA risks losing members because they are not focusing in safe staffing, which saves lives and prevents nurse burnout:
    New York, NY — October 26, 2012 — Nurses have voted by 91% to move forward and disaffiliate from the American Nurses Association.
    The nurses, members of the New York State Nurses Association, say they will focus on fighting for working nurses and their patients.
    Their number one focus is passing a New York law that would mandate safe nurse-to-patient ratios in hospitals.
    New York nurses vote 91% to move forward and leave the American Nurses Association - News & Events - Massachusetts Nurses Association

  • Nov 5

    There is No Such Thing as “Free” Vaccines: Why We Rejected Pfizer’s Donation Offer of Pneumonia Vaccines
    ... Pneumonia claims the lives of nearly one million kids each year, making it the world’s deadliest disease among children. Although there’s a vaccine to prevent this disease, it’s too expensive for many developing countries and humanitarian organizations, such as ours, to afford. As the only producers of the pneumonia vaccine, Pfizer and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) are able to keep the price of the vaccine artificially high; since 2009, the two companies have earned $36 billion on this vaccine alone. For years, we have been trying to negotiate with the companies to lower the price of the vaccine, but they offered us donations instead.
    ..

    ...
    Isn’t free better?
    No. Free is not always better. Donations often involve numerous conditions and strings attached, including restrictions on which patient populations and what geographic areas are allowed to receive the benefits.
    This process can delay starting vaccination campaigns, which would be an untenable situation in emergency settings, or grossly limit who you’re able to reach with the vaccine.
    Donations can also undermine long-term efforts to increase access to affordable vaccines and medicines.
    They remove incentives for new manufacturers to enter a market when it’s absorbed through a donation arrangement. We need competition from new companies to bring down prices overall — something we don’t have currently for the pneumonia vaccine.
    Donations are often used as a way to make others "pay up."
    By giving the pneumonia vaccine away for free, pharmaceutical corporations can use this as justification for why prices remain high for others, including other humanitarian organizations and developing countries that also can’t afford the vaccine.
    Countries, which continue to voice their frustration at being unable to afford new and costly vaccines such as PCV, need lower prices as well to protect children’s health.

    Critically, donation offers can disappear as quickly as they come. The donor has ultimate control over when and how they choose to give their products away, risking interruption of programs should the company decide it’s no longer to their advantage.
    For example, Uganda is now facing a nationwide shortage of Diflucan, an essential crytpococcal meningitis drug, in spite of Pfizer’s commitment to donate the drugs to the government.
    There are other similar examples of companies’ donation programs leaving governments and health organizations in a lurch without the medical tools they need to treat patients.

    To avoid these risks and to limit the use of in-kind medical products donations, the World Health Organization (WHO), and other leading global health organizations such as UNICEF and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, have clear recommendations against donation offers from pharmaceutical corporations...
    There is No Such Thing as “Free” Vaccines: Why We Rejected Pfizer’s Donation Offer of Pneumonia Vaccines | MSF USA

  • Nov 5

    MSF already negotiated lower prices with GlaxoSmithKline (GSK)


    MSF Welcomes GSK's Decision to Lower Price of Pneumonia Vaccine for Some of the World's Most Vulnerable Children
    The international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) welcomes the decision by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) to lower the price of its pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) for humanitarian organizations that serve refugee and crisis-affected children.
    For seven years, MSF has been in discussions with GSK and Pfizer—the only two producers of the pneumonia vaccine—for access to a more affordable price.
    GSK’s price reduction is a significant step forward in protecting vulnerable children who are reached by humanitarian organizations like MSF.
    MSF now hopes that Pfizer will match GSK’s offer, and that both companies will additionally reduce the price of the vaccine for governments of developing countries that still can’t afford to add the PCV vaccine to their standard childhood immunization package...

    ... Until now, neither MSF nor other humanitarian organizations have been able to purchase pneumonia vaccines at an affordable price. Earlier this year, MSF paid $68.10 for one dose ($204.30 for the three doses needed to vaccinate one child) of the Pfizer product to vaccinate refugee children in Greece—20 times more than the lowest price that GSK and Pfizer offer.
    In April, MSF delivered the names of more than 416,000 people from 170 countries who signed a petition asking Pfizer and GSK to reduce the price of the pneumonia vaccine to $5 per child (for all three doses) for crisis-affected populations and for all developing countries...
    ... With its September 19 announcement, GSK has now pledged to offer humanitarian organizations a price of approximately $9.00 per child ($3.05 per dose)...
    MSF Welcomes GSK's Decision to Lower Price of Pneumonia Vaccine for Some of the World's Most Vulnerable Children | MSF USA

  • Nov 3

    There is No Such Thing as “Free” Vaccines: Why We Rejected Pfizer’s Donation Offer of Pneumonia Vaccines
    ... Pneumonia claims the lives of nearly one million kids each year, making it the world’s deadliest disease among children. Although there’s a vaccine to prevent this disease, it’s too expensive for many developing countries and humanitarian organizations, such as ours, to afford. As the only producers of the pneumonia vaccine, Pfizer and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) are able to keep the price of the vaccine artificially high; since 2009, the two companies have earned $36 billion on this vaccine alone. For years, we have been trying to negotiate with the companies to lower the price of the vaccine, but they offered us donations instead.
    ..

    ...
    Isn’t free better?
    No. Free is not always better. Donations often involve numerous conditions and strings attached, including restrictions on which patient populations and what geographic areas are allowed to receive the benefits.
    This process can delay starting vaccination campaigns, which would be an untenable situation in emergency settings, or grossly limit who you’re able to reach with the vaccine.
    Donations can also undermine long-term efforts to increase access to affordable vaccines and medicines.
    They remove incentives for new manufacturers to enter a market when it’s absorbed through a donation arrangement. We need competition from new companies to bring down prices overall — something we don’t have currently for the pneumonia vaccine.
    Donations are often used as a way to make others "pay up."
    By giving the pneumonia vaccine away for free, pharmaceutical corporations can use this as justification for why prices remain high for others, including other humanitarian organizations and developing countries that also can’t afford the vaccine.
    Countries, which continue to voice their frustration at being unable to afford new and costly vaccines such as PCV, need lower prices as well to protect children’s health.

    Critically, donation offers can disappear as quickly as they come. The donor has ultimate control over when and how they choose to give their products away, risking interruption of programs should the company decide it’s no longer to their advantage.
    For example, Uganda is now facing a nationwide shortage of Diflucan, an essential crytpococcal meningitis drug, in spite of Pfizer’s commitment to donate the drugs to the government.
    There are other similar examples of companies’ donation programs leaving governments and health organizations in a lurch without the medical tools they need to treat patients.

    To avoid these risks and to limit the use of in-kind medical products donations, the World Health Organization (WHO), and other leading global health organizations such as UNICEF and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, have clear recommendations against donation offers from pharmaceutical corporations...
    There is No Such Thing as “Free” Vaccines: Why We Rejected Pfizer’s Donation Offer of Pneumonia Vaccines | MSF USA

  • Nov 1

    There is No Such Thing as “Free” Vaccines: Why We Rejected Pfizer’s Donation Offer of Pneumonia Vaccines
    ... Pneumonia claims the lives of nearly one million kids each year, making it the world’s deadliest disease among children. Although there’s a vaccine to prevent this disease, it’s too expensive for many developing countries and humanitarian organizations, such as ours, to afford. As the only producers of the pneumonia vaccine, Pfizer and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) are able to keep the price of the vaccine artificially high; since 2009, the two companies have earned $36 billion on this vaccine alone. For years, we have been trying to negotiate with the companies to lower the price of the vaccine, but they offered us donations instead.
    ..

    ...
    Isn’t free better?
    No. Free is not always better. Donations often involve numerous conditions and strings attached, including restrictions on which patient populations and what geographic areas are allowed to receive the benefits.
    This process can delay starting vaccination campaigns, which would be an untenable situation in emergency settings, or grossly limit who you’re able to reach with the vaccine.
    Donations can also undermine long-term efforts to increase access to affordable vaccines and medicines.
    They remove incentives for new manufacturers to enter a market when it’s absorbed through a donation arrangement. We need competition from new companies to bring down prices overall — something we don’t have currently for the pneumonia vaccine.
    Donations are often used as a way to make others "pay up."
    By giving the pneumonia vaccine away for free, pharmaceutical corporations can use this as justification for why prices remain high for others, including other humanitarian organizations and developing countries that also can’t afford the vaccine.
    Countries, which continue to voice their frustration at being unable to afford new and costly vaccines such as PCV, need lower prices as well to protect children’s health.

    Critically, donation offers can disappear as quickly as they come. The donor has ultimate control over when and how they choose to give their products away, risking interruption of programs should the company decide it’s no longer to their advantage.
    For example, Uganda is now facing a nationwide shortage of Diflucan, an essential crytpococcal meningitis drug, in spite of Pfizer’s commitment to donate the drugs to the government.
    There are other similar examples of companies’ donation programs leaving governments and health organizations in a lurch without the medical tools they need to treat patients.

    To avoid these risks and to limit the use of in-kind medical products donations, the World Health Organization (WHO), and other leading global health organizations such as UNICEF and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, have clear recommendations against donation offers from pharmaceutical corporations...
    There is No Such Thing as “Free” Vaccines: Why We Rejected Pfizer’s Donation Offer of Pneumonia Vaccines | MSF USA

  • Oct 18

    Management thinks nurses are an expense.
    Fact is that patients are hospitalized because they need nursing care.
    As soon as they no longer need nursing care they are discharged.
    All other care is available as an outpatient.

    The "product" of a hospital is nursing care.

  • Oct 17

    Quote from ArtClassRN
    A mostly unpublicized aspect of this strike is that the MNA nurses gave in to Allina demands during negotiations. Nurses agreed to transition off the expensive nurse-only plans that we had bargained for. In return, nurses asked that Allina agree in writing to preserve the value of the "Allina core plans" we are transferring to. Allina refused, demanding the right to reduce the actuarial value of those plans by up to 5% a year. Nurses asked that the plans not decrease in value by 5% over the length of the three year contract.

    This entire dispute is about Allina trying to strip benefits and nurses trying to hang onto them. The union did not begin negotiations making a single demand, we would have settled for the same terms as the previous contract. Allina got what they wanted, we agreed to let them slash our benefits. We just wanted Allina to agree to not further slash them.

    Allina refused. They want the right to continue to hack away at our compensation.
    THANK YOU!
    I consider you and your colleagues to be doing this for all nurses. I'm so glad you have support from the community.
    Almost 5,000 nurses at 5 Twin Cities hospitals go on strike
    By Tory Cooney, St. Paul Pioneer Press on Sep 5, 2016 at 10:52 p.m

    The strike follows a 22-hour negotiation session that stretched from Friday into Saturday morning but failed to produce an agreement between the Minnesota Nurses Association and Minneapolis-based Allina...

    ... “We want to reach an agreement and go back to work. The ball is in Allina’s court. We’re here when they’re willing to talk,” said negotiating team member Mike Ciampi...

    The St. Paul picketers, dressed in red and holding signs, circulated along Smith Street in front of the hospital. Passing cars showed their support by honking their horns and cheering. Even city buses and ambulances joined in the honking, while individuals and businesses donated water, ice and food to help the nurses, MNA spokeswoman Barbara Brady said...

    ... MNA nurses on strike from each facility will be “ready and available” to return in case of a medical emergency, the union announced in a statement Sunday.
    “Nurses care for their patients, even beyond the bedside,” Angela Becchetti, a nurse at Abbott Northwestern, was quoted as saying. “MNA nurses have always responded to emergencies on their own just like the 35W bridge collapse when hundreds of nurses showed up at every metro hospital to assist.”...
    Almost 5, nurses at 5 Twin Cities hospitals go on strike | Duluth News Tribune

  • Oct 8

    With nurses on the outside, Allina CEO focuses her attention on the real issues: Health Catalyst
    Mathew Keller, RN JD Regulatory and Policy Nursing Specialist, 9/6/16
    It’s been well reported that Allina Health, a $3.9-billion nonprofit healthcare organization, “invested” $108 million in Health Catalyst, a private for-profit technology company. As part of the deal, Allina is outsourcing its “data warehousing, analytics, performance improvement technology, and personnel to Health Catalyst.”
    In fact, the money Allina spends on Health Catalyst “represents the cost of what the staff and tools” were costing Allina, according to Allina CEO Penny Wheeler.
    In other words, Allina took a segment of its business and paid to outsource it to a for-profit company.
    The conflicts of interest abound. For starters, Allina CEO Penny Wheeler is on the Health Catalyst Board of Directors...

    ... As Health Catalyst CEO Dan Burton wrote in a press release, one of the aims of the deal with Allina Health is to “’Turbocharge’ financial… outcomes.”...
    ... While 4,800 of its nurses are on the outside of the hospitals, asking for Allina to come to a fair deal, Abbott Northwestern Hospital’s senior vice president couldn’t be bothered — he’s in Salt Lake City, at Health Catalyst’s annual conference...

    ... at a time when Abbott Northwestern is facing a crisis, at a time when the employees who actually deliver the care patients receive are outside of the hospital doors, at a time when leadership is needed more than ever, Abbott’s senior vice president’s time and attention are focused on one thing: Health Catalyst.
    With nurses on the outside, Allina CEO focuses her attention on the real issues: Health Catalyst - Minnesota Nurses Association


close