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Joined Mar 14, '04 - from 'California, USA'. herring_RN is a retired registered nurse. She has '>40 years' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Critical care, tele, Medical-Surgical'. Posts: 15,934 (72% Liked) Likes: 30,256

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  • Aug 22

    How about discussing Hillary Clinton on health and/or nursing related issues?
    Hillary Clinton on the issues | Hillary for America

    Addiction and substance use | Hillary for America

    You may enjoy participating in political discussions in the break room:
    US Political News, Analysis and Opinions


  • Aug 19

    How about discussing Hillary Clinton on health and/or nursing related issues?
    Hillary Clinton on the issues | Hillary for America

    Addiction and substance use | Hillary for America

    You may enjoy participating in political discussions in the break room:
    US Political News, Analysis and Opinions


  • Aug 17

    Quote from AndyB
    Aetna said it will exit 11 of the 15 states where it offers coverage through the Affordable Care Act, widely known as Obamacare. That affects about 80 percent of its customers covered through insurance marketplaces.

    Earlier this month, Humana said it will cut back its participation on the exchanges from 15 states to 11. On an earnings call in July, UnitedHealth Group chief executive Stephen Hemsley announced that his company plans to remain on “three or fewer exchange markets.”
    In a reversal of expectations, Anthem said it is projecting mid-single-digit losses on the individual plans it sells on the exchanges for 2016. And Cigna has said that it is losing money on the exchange.
    Health insurance comrporations are concerned with profit, paying shareholders, and mergers and acquisitions. That is why I support "Medicare For All": Physicians for a National Health Program

    From a letter from Aetna to the Department of Justice threatening to quit the ACA unless they were allowed to buy Humana:
    ... Our customers expect us to keep their insurance products affordable and continually improving, and our shareholders expect that we will generate a market return on invested capital for them.
    http://big.assets.huffingtonpost.com/AetnaDOJletter.pdf
    Article info came from:
    http://big.assets.huffingtonpost.com/AetnaDOJletter.pdf

    Why are their executives paid so much more than the physicians, nurses, and others who actually provide care?
    Almost $30 million a year: AETNA CEO paid 27.9 million in 2015.

    More than $66 million a year: UnitedHealth CEO Stephen Hemsley made more than $66 million in 214 - StarTribune.com

  • Aug 15

    How about getting back to the topic of "Hillary Clinton Regarding NURSING?

    I think candidate Clinton needs education regarding nursing.
    She seems to understand that safe nurse staffing is critical to safe, effective, and therapeutic patient care.
    However she seems not to know that there has not been a shortage of nurses in recent years. (I think there may be one coming as evidenced by the recent post cards, phone calls, and flyers I've been getting advertising job opportunities.)
    What do YOU think of her answer below?

    Q. Many licensed healthcare professionals, particularly RNs, are leaving hospital service because of difficult working conditions, including excessive and unsafe workloads, understaffing and mandatory overtime.
    What would you do to address these problems and to improve recruitment and retention of nurses and other healthcare professionals?


    HRC:
    I know that we must address the nursing shortage in this country and give nurses the training, education, and support they need to provide the care patients deserve.
    We need appropriate nurse-to-patient ratios in order to improve patient care and working conditions for nurses.

    I have a history of working for America's nurses.
    As Senator, I was proud to champion provisions in the Nurse Reinvestment Act that provided significant resources to recruit and train nurses, and I introduced the Nursing Education and Quality of Health Care Act.
    I believe it is important that all American employees are safe and protected where they work.
    In particular, I believe that we need to consider the effects of ergonomic hazards in order to quickly and effectively address musculoskeletal disorders in the workplace.
    I know that this is a problem for nurses, who often suffer from back-related injuries as a result of having to move and lift patients.
    Page not found | American Federation of Teachers

  • Jul 25

    In the 1980s I read a newspaper article regarding a trial where a nurse sued a surgeon for $1.00.
    Nurses were quoted saying that the physician had thrown a scalpel into the wall more than once. Employees were actually afraid of him.
    They filled out incident reports, but he still yelled and threw thing regularly.

    The nurse and witnesses testified that the surgeon ordered a sterile packet opened. The wrong packet was opened. The surgeon yelled, "Stupid." and threw the empty plastic packet. It hit the nurse's nose. She sued for pain and suffering. 25 cents for each day it hurt. The judge ruled in her favor and ordered the surgeon to pay $10,000.00 in punitive damages in addition to the dollar she had sued for.

  • Jul 25

    We had a surgeon who often loudly berated nursing staff.
    We started calling a "Code Purple' when that happened. (There was no actual code purple at our facility)
    The unit secretary and other available staff would respond with clipboards documenting in real time what was said and done.
    Copies were provided to our nurse manager, medical director, and risk management.

    Twice it happened in front of a patient. One patient told me the following night that someone from "Customer relations" came to his room and asked about it and apologized for the doctor's behavior.

    The yelling, name calling, and insults stopped.

  • Jul 25

    The only reason for someone to be admitted to a hospital is for nursing care.

  • Jul 24

    The only reason for someone to be admitted to a hospital is for nursing care.

  • Jul 23

    In the 1980s I read a newspaper article regarding a trial where a nurse sued a surgeon for $1.00.
    Nurses were quoted saying that the physician had thrown a scalpel into the wall more than once. Employees were actually afraid of him.
    They filled out incident reports, but he still yelled and threw thing regularly.

    The nurse and witnesses testified that the surgeon ordered a sterile packet opened. The wrong packet was opened. The surgeon yelled, "Stupid." and threw the empty plastic packet. It hit the nurse's nose. She sued for pain and suffering. 25 cents for each day it hurt. The judge ruled in her favor and ordered the surgeon to pay $10,000.00 in punitive damages in addition to the dollar she had sued for.

  • Jul 23

    ... The National Labor Relations Board drew a firm line through one maneuver that has hamstrung union organizing in shops that employ “permatemps” and contract workers side by side with direct employees...
    ... For more than a decade, a union hoping to organize all those workers into a single bargaining unit had to get permission from each of the employers to do so — the ultimate “user” employer and the contract supplier...
    "Anyone familiar with the Act’s history might well wonder why employees must obtain the consent of their employers in order to bargain collectively." — NLRB majority in Miller & Anderson case
    Labor regulators strike another blow against employers shortchanging workers - LA Times

  • Jul 21

    In the 1980s I read a newspaper article regarding a trial where a nurse sued a surgeon for $1.00.
    Nurses were quoted saying that the physician had thrown a scalpel into the wall more than once. Employees were actually afraid of him.
    They filled out incident reports, but he still yelled and threw thing regularly.

    The nurse and witnesses testified that the surgeon ordered a sterile packet opened. The wrong packet was opened. The surgeon yelled, "Stupid." and threw the empty plastic packet. It hit the nurse's nose. She sued for pain and suffering. 25 cents for each day it hurt. The judge ruled in her favor and ordered the surgeon to pay $10,000.00 in punitive damages in addition to the dollar she had sued for.

  • Jul 21

    We had a surgeon who often loudly berated nursing staff.
    We started calling a "Code Purple' when that happened. (There was no actual code purple at our facility)
    The unit secretary and other available staff would respond with clipboards documenting in real time what was said and done.
    Copies were provided to our nurse manager, medical director, and risk management.

    Twice it happened in front of a patient. One patient told me the following night that someone from "Customer relations" came to his room and asked about it and apologized for the doctor's behavior.

    The yelling, name calling, and insults stopped.

  • Jul 19

    The only reason for someone to be admitted to a hospital is for nursing care.

  • Jul 17

    About single-payer national health insurance: Single-Payer National Health Insurance | Physicians for a National Health Program

    Key Features of Single-Payer
    • Universal, Comprehensive Coverage Only such coverage ensures access, avoids a two-class system, and minimizes expense
    • No out-of-pocket payments Co-payments and deductibles are barriers to access, administratively unwieldy, and unnecessary for cost containment
    • A single insurance plan in each region, administered by a public or quasi-public agency A fragmentary payment system that entrusts private firms with administration ensures the waste of billions of dollars on useless paper pushing and profits. Private insurance duplicating public coverage fosters two-class care and drives up costs; such duplication should be prohibited
    • Global operating budgets for hospitals, nursing homes, allowed group and staff model HMOs and other providers with separate allocation of capital funds Billing on a per-patient basis creates unnecessary administrative complexity and expense. A budget separate from operating expenses will be allowed for capital improvements
    • Free Choice of Providers Patients should be free to seek care from any licensed health care provider, without financial incentives or penalties
    • Public Accountability, Not Corporate Dictates The public has an absolute right to democratically set overall health policies and priorities, but medical decisions must be made by patients and providers rather than dictated from afar. Market mechanisms principally empower employers and insurance bureaucrats pursuing narrow financial interests
    • Ban on For-Profit Health Care Providers Profit seeking inevitably distorts care and diverts resources from patients to investors
    • Protection of the rights of health care and insurance workers A single-payer national health program would eliminate the jobs of hundreds of thousands of people who currently perform billing, advertising, eligibility determination, and other superfluous tasks. These workers must be guaranteed retraining and placement in meaningful jobs.

    from the American Journal of Public Health January 2003, Vol 93, No.1
    Key Features of Single-Payer | Physicians for a National Health Program
    Medicare For All | National Nurses United

  • Jul 12

    Quote from pmabraham
    Because being in a union offers ZERO guarantees of anything being better. So you have less in your paycheck to support those who may not be doing a single thing to make things better. And if they help bad employees stay employed, then they take a part of your pay to make life worse.
    If "bad" employees are kept it is due to incompetent management.
    A union contract generally requires that discipline, including termination, be for "Just Cause".

    The most extreme I read about in the paper was a hospital where employees were allowed to be late routinely because they traveled from another job. Also some took lunch breaks that took up almost half their shift:
    ... Some employees habitually fail to show up, logging weeks, even months, of unexcused absences each year. And those who do come to work often don't do their jobs, causing one consultant in 2002 to remark that they had "retired in place."
    Others are distracted or impaired. County Civil Service Commission filings tell of staff members grabbing and clawingeach other's necks; inspection reports tell of patients literally dying of neglect.
    Underfunding is a myth, but the squandering is real - LA Times
    The most extreme example I've been told about was a nurse who wanted to fight a termination after he was caught with narcotics in his socks. His fellow nurses were there when he refused to stay when the count came up short, ran, and was stopped by security.
    Because the union had to provide representation a rep attended the meeting and took notes as one after another witness reported the same.
    The union refused to go to arbitration, he threatened to sue. He was given a list of attorneys because he was also reported to the board. He never sued.

    I remember once I was asked to attend an arbitration at another facility. An RN had been terminated for rudeness.
    The manager had written her up once before for refusing to care for a patient in ICU and and four others on her telemetry unit. She had fought that because she was not competent to work in ICY and because it was physically in another nearby unit.
    Even though that nurse had prevailed the manager felt there had been progressive discipline.

    The "rudeness" consisted of an accusation that she had been rude to a patient. The assignment sheet did not include that patient.
    In report she was told the patient was discharged and just waiting for a ride. She was getting an admit from ER into that bed.

    About 7:20 pm she saw the patient in a wheelchair in the hallway. The secretary said no one had been able to contact his family to take him home. The nurse called both phone numbers and left a message. She bought him dinner from the cafeteria because he was no longer in the computer. She helped him to the bathroom.
    he then told the charge nurse who called the supervisor. She put her concern that her assignment was unsafe because her patient had no room and with him to care for she was assigned more patients than allowed by the ratio regulations. The supervisor said, "Do the best you can."

    About 10:30 pm she noticed the patient was gone. The secretary told her, "The daughter came and got him."

    She testified at the arbitration that she had told her manager that she had neither discharges the patient nor took him down to the car, but her manager accused her of lying.
    Plus he was no her patient because he had already been discharged.

    The daughter testified that the doctor had told her at 3:00 pm her father would stay another night. She went shopping. She didn't have a cell phone with her. When she got home she was surprised and angry with the message. She came to get her father and a nurse seemed to be in a hurry. She pushed him out to the car. That nurse was so rude she wouldn't answer any questions. After her father was in the car she asked, "Why is my father going home? The doctor told me tomorrow."
    She said, "That rude nurse just kept saying, "OK, Bye."

    When the union representative's turn came to question the daughter he said, "Do you know the name of the nurse?
    daughter, "Yes it is *****." (the name of the terminated nurse)
    Union rep, "Did you read her name tag?"
    Daughter, "No ***** told me her name." (gave name of terminated nurae)
    Union rep, "Would you recognize her if you see her?"
    Daughter, "Yes I would. I looked at her face and asked her questions and she just said, "OK. Bye"
    Union rep, "Is she here in this room?"
    The daughter looked at all us women. She made eye contact with me and the six other women at the table and against the wall. Then she said, "No. She is not here."

    The terminated RN began to cry. The arbitrator said, "I will reverse the termination. You will receive my written judgment in three days."

    The RN was crying. She asked her manager, "Why do you hate me?"

    The manager yelled, "Because you look like the woman my husband left me for."

    That was the most exciting arbitration.
    But although most are tedious and boring they are important sometimes when a nurse is terminated and there was no just cause.


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