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klone, MSN, RN 65,365 Views

Joined Apr 2, '03 - from 'Oregon'. klone is a L&D. She has '10+' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Women's Health/OB Leadership'. Posts: 11,013 (54% Liked) Likes: 26,331

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  • Dec 7

    Have you spoken with the education department of your hospital. One small facility I worked at allowed me to come by the education office and one of their instructors did my skills check for me during our lunch break.

  • Dec 6

    Wow. That sucks. I am a nurse at a university and we love our housekeepers. We all work as a team and respect and value each other.

  • Dec 5

    Quote from Cola89
    What this nurse manager did was give me a vague complaint without any specific context "they (some people and I don't know if the medical director is one of those people- I'm told he likes to complain about nurses) are saying you seem to lack confidence.

    Then she said -- "what can I do to help you?". I didn't know how to answer, because I didn't necessarily agree with what she said and she didn't give me any explanation.

    I told her I would like to know who said what, and she said she would have to look through her files, she will get the specifics, and get back with me at a later date.

    I walked away from that meeting she initiated feeling demoralized, and like my coworkers don't like me/don't have my back...

    Like I don't wanna work in such an environment.
    You have a legitimate complaint about how your manager handled it. But in no way was she "gossiping" or revealing "tidbits about your coworkers."

    In the big picture, it doesn't really matter who said what. If she won't give you any further guidance about what your actual shortcomings are and how to improve, I will backtrack and say that at that point, it might just be best to shake your head, shrug, then go about the business of being a good nurse without giving this much more thought.

  • Dec 3

    AA folks (the other AA) talk a lot about "stinkin' thinkin'". It refers to the phenomenon of self-sabotage by means of unrealistic expectations, inaccurate assumptions and dishonesty with oneself.

    In this case, labelling everyone who has an opinion you don't like a "bully" neatly lets you off the hook of responsibility for your own assumptions and behavior. The payoff is, since you don't get to control others' perceptions, thoughts or behavior, you've bought yourself an endless supply of tea and sympathy, not to mention people telling you how awesome you are.

    Enjoy!

  • Dec 3

    Quote from TriciaJ
    I've had managers that liked to pass on "complaints" that were extremely vague and from anonymous people. My responses:
    "If I had specifics, I could take that seriously." "If I knew who I caused a problem for, I could apologize and make amends."

    That lets a manager know that you are open to legitimate feedback but you are not going to be sucked in by nonsense. It also cuts way down on being dragged into the "principal's office."
    IMO, feedback isn't necessarily not "legitimate" because the source is anonymous. The problem as you describe it above is that it is vague. For example, if a new nurse is not charting her vital signs at the appropriate intervals, it really is irrelevant who reports it. Apologies are not needed, action to remedy it is. In the OP's scenario, there was no specific complaint given and no plan for improvement suggested. Those are the important missing pieces.

  • Dec 3

    I would draw the line at cheap whiskey.

  • Nov 30

    Yeah, this is silly. It reminds me of when Bic tried to market pens for woman. Nurses don't need special coffee. I work in a hospital that doesn't provide coffee at all. There's a chain coffee place in the lobby with limited hours and a 24/7 chain coffee place across the street that is continuously busy. Several units have Keurigs, too, so staff stash K cups in their lockers. It's a solution looking for a problem.

  • Nov 30

    The marketing to nurses would be off putting to me. The premise is non sensical. And there's nothing creative about it, amazing coffee is already available and there is just no connection for me.

    Non nurses aren't going to go crazy buying it up and the nurses' recognition is lost for any nurse that has to pay for it.

    And if I wanted to donate to something meaningful to me, I'm going to give it directly.

    I don't like to be so discouraging but it seemed that you were looking for opinions either way.

  • Nov 29

    Quote from klone
    This is recommended by all health organizations (WHO, CDC, ACOG). It's part of the initiative called "cocooning" - the vaccine is not for YOU, but so that you will pass on the immunities to your baby, which will help protect him/her for the first couple months until s/he can be vaccinated. It is recommended all women get the TDap vaccine in the third trimester of EVERY pregnancy, irrespective of when she last had it.
    Yes, listen to your physician. This is very important.

    Anyone coming in contact with your newborn needs to have an updated vaccination as well. That means Grandma and Grandpa!

  • Nov 29

    Quote from klone
    This is recommended by all health organizations (WHO, CDC, ACOG). It's part of the initiative called "cocooning" - the vaccine is not for YOU, but so that you will pass on the immunities to your baby, which will help protect him/her for the first couple months until s/he can be vaccinated. It is recommended all women get the TDap vaccine in the third trimester of EVERY pregnancy, irrespective of when she last had it.
    I don't know if I forgot that, it wasn't the case when I was pregnant, or I never knew it to begin with, but thank you for that informational post.

  • Nov 27

    OP- I appreciate your determination, but there is no comparison to be made here. I worked in GME (Graduate Medical Education) in a medical residency for eleven years before leaving for nursing education. The path to NP vs. MD or DO are two completely different things. If you look into the competition for residencies among medical students- and the history and culture of this is fascinating- it is just a beast. There are a limited number of placements in different residencies, competition for "lifestyle" residencies such as dermatology being a case in point. You might want to read Match day: One day and one dramatic year in the lives of three new doctors by Brian Eule. It's really well-researched.
    Best wishes in your journey.

  • Nov 25

    You have to be accepted into a residency after med school. There are supply and demand issues and not everybody gets to specialize in what they want. The students with the top grades, high scores and good recommendations probably get what they want, the ones in the middle hope for the best, and the weakest students take anything they can get.
    Nursing deals with supply and demand too. The desirable jobs and specialties come with competition.

  • Nov 23

    It seems pretty extreme that you want to quite your entire goal of being a nurse with one no call, no show. Do you have anxiety issues? Otherwise are there other things that make you not want to do this?

  • Nov 22

    Quote from WKShadowRN
    Well, of course not. As a middle manager I often used my own funds (not company money) to do recognition, but it's only part of the picture and for instant gratification. Developing a safe culture and promoting an environment conducive to productivity and happy workers takes many types of input. Proactive management is one, appreciative superiors is another, among several.
    I think everyone realizes that, but your previous post dismissed the OPs ideas for middle managers doing their part.

    I would rather support OP's effort into writing and submitting suggestions (for a part of the picture) then to respond with a "yeah but".

  • Nov 22

    To above posters:

    I think OP was referring to middle managers who can only do so much to recognize staff. Can you credit a middle manager who hits the floor with you and makes an effort to give praise or recognition, as does OPs managers?

    Or does the executive management's budget for staffing really negate everything that a supportive manager does for their staff/unit? Should the middle manager just give up efforts to show appreciation?


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