Content That klone Likes

Content That klone Likes

klone, MSN, RN 52,412 Views

Joined Apr 2, '03 - from 'Denver, CO, US'. klone is a Charge Nurse, Women's Health/Public Health. She has '10' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'OB/Gyn, research, lactation'. Posts: 10,622 (53% Liked) Likes: 24,548

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  • Apr 30

    Quote from thmpr
    Stop enabling the OP, people. This is a red flag.

    XNavyCorpsman is correct and OP needs to own his/her mistake and demonstrate accountability. There is no room in nursing for people who can't read the directions, follow rules, and manage their impulses.

    OP,
    Make an appointment with your doctor first thing and disclose everything. Respect yourself and others enough to TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF before taking care of others.

    Disclose what?? That on one occasion, s/he was anxious about school and her/his concerned, well-meaning mother offered one of her Ativan tablets? And s/he followed Mom's advice, and now realizes that was a mistake? That's hardly plummeting into the abyss ...

  • Apr 30

    Quote from blondy2061h
    For all the people saying, "How would lay people know it's illegal to share controlled substances?" every time I've filled a controlled script, it had an orange sticker right on it informing me so.
    I just looked at my bottle of Xanax. No such sticker or similar wording anywhere on the label.

  • Apr 30

    Quote from jadelpn
    I guess I am a bit unclear on this. Your mother GAVE you this medication to take? Right before a drug test? And why were you all worked up over a drug test to begin with? With all that being said, it makes me sad that you are continuing to blame yourself--you didn't "mess up" you were listening to your mother, who I am unclear on what the motivation of her actions were.

    There seems to be more to this situation than you have indicated. To be blunt, there seems to be a lot of sabotage happening, the specifics of which is none of my business, and at this point not exactly relevant.

    However, my suggestion is that going forward you seek some assistance in controlling your anxiety. That you speak to your academic advisor on how to proceed with your education and defer the clinical portion--which is what I am assuming the drug test was for. That you perhaps look into a summer schedule of a certification (ie:medical coding, informatics) then decide if you want to proceed in the fall with your nursing education when you are able to get all of your ducks in a row.

    You need options and choices. You need to be informed of where all of your classes stand at present--and degree options. Just until you are able to manage your anxiety.

    Unfortunately, if the thought of a pee test gets you into a state of panic, the pressure and pace of clinicals may not be the best thing for you right now.

    Speaking of peeing, don't get into a peeing contest with Mom. What's done is done, and regardless of the circumstances surrounding this, you need to change up your dynamic going forward. Whomever you see about your anxiety can assist with this as well.

    Best wishes.
    S/he was stressed about moving away to school, starting nursing school, etc not the drug test and mom offered an anxiolytics. I don't find that sabotaging. It's something that the lay public doesn't grasp about sharing Rx medication and they don't understand narcotics and what other drugs are considered "drugs of abuse" mom was just trying to help - it looks like to me. It was poor timing and poor judgment on the students part - as they are now aware.

    The spot in that program is likely jeopardized however it's done and over with and will should not come back to haunt the student in the future when applying to other schools.

    I do agree that the student definitely needs to get anxiety under control whether it be with medications or otherwise because nursing school is vey anxiety inducing.

  • Apr 29

    Quote from NurseRatchedTheBest
    this is all hypothetical. my point is to see where hipaa starts and where it ends for the casual nurse. With social media, texts, pictures etc etc that never go away that can come back YEARS later we now live in a federal nightmare. If Jay Z comes to burger king I can tweet the world the he ordered a hot dog. But if I (THE NURSE) tweet Jay Z is at the hospital and I work there is that a violation? Is it a violation if someone tweeted that and they were in the waiting room at the time and saw him walk in?
    Leaving aside that you're claiming you don't know if sharing a patient name is a HIPAA violation...

    There are HIPAA violations and then there's bad behavior.

    If you chat about a patient in an elevator, even without using patient identifiers, especially with visitors present, that's bad behavior. It is probably against company policy and is likely to get you disciplined.

    If you post ANYTHING about work, coworkers, or patients to social media, employers may decide it's Bad Behavior and discipline or terminate you. My last several employers have been very emphatic about their right to regulate what you say about them.

    It's why I have no social media accounts whatsoever under my real name, provide access only to "Friends" where possible, never "Friend" coworkers, and never affiliate my accounts with an employer by name. I even created a new account here last year because I had been casually active under a username that included part of my name in it, and I decided I no longer wanted to take that risk.

    If the patient can be identified, it's a HIPAA violation. Just because it's not a HIPAA violation doesn't mean it's ok.

  • Apr 29

    Well duh, but if a family member tells the Dr. during a code to stop, we stop.

  • Apr 27

    Yes, but not all the clinics do abortion services and they do more than abortions. The counsel people on family planning, provide birth control, do pap smears and breast exams, provide education on these issues, etc....this is exactly the kind of environment I want to work i . I am trying to get away from the bedside.....

  • Apr 27

    Quote from NurseRatchedTheBest
    this is all hypothetical. my point is to see where hipaa starts and where it ends for the casual nurse. With social media, texts, pictures etc etc that never go away that can come back YEARS later we now live in a federal nightmare. If Jay Z comes to burger king I can tweet the world the he ordered a hot dog. But if I (THE NURSE) tweet Jay Z is at the hospital and I work there is that a violation? Is it a violation if someone tweeted that and they were in the waiting room at the time and saw him walk in?
    To answer your original question, I believe there have to be patient identifiers. And even if there are none, it is not a good idea to discuss patients in a hospital elevator or anywhere public where another person, anyone, can overhear what is said. Clinicians discuss their patients all the time among themselves.

  • Apr 27

    QUOTE= Heathermaizey; What??? This makes no sense at all. HIPAA is pretty simple and clear cut. You can not talk about patients at all. There you go.


    If one could not talk about a "patient at all," then there would be NO medical books to learn from, NO case studies, No way to gather scientific-based evidence because discussing anything would be a HIPAA violation. It's about the identity of a person not a patients sickness. They just can not be tied together.

    Here is a example of how one can discuss a patient. No date and time, no names, don't identify the location. Don't talk as this was your patient. I've gone to many seminars. The opening sentence starts off by the Provider or Speaker stating: A patient presented, etc. and continues to expose every single detail without it being a HIPAA violation.

  • Apr 26

    I do also want to say that if you're in any way on the fence about midwifery, it's probably best not to pursue it. It's a very unique career that really requires complete dedication. If you are still unsure, I feel like you're just going to end up being disappointed and will have wasted a large amount of money.

  • Apr 21

    I don't think that we can help you. It seems clear that you are between a rock & a hard place. You must go back to school in order to remain employed as an NP. It doesn't matter what nurses' or nursing professors' opinions are. It is unfortunate that you must go back to school, incur expenses and hire a babysitter, but those things are standard for obtaining a degree.m it is standard procedure for college credits to expire after 5 or 10 years when those credits were never applied to a degree.

  • Apr 19

    Quote from offlabel
    Who does that? Women that want to avoid pelvic relaxation corrective surgery in the future, that's who. And it's far more common, apparently, than folks realize.
    While pelvic floor relaxation corrective surgery might be more common, people choosing a section to prevent this, having one major abdominal surgery to avoid the *possibility* of another, is simply NOT a major influence in the rising c section rates across the country. It doesn't account for why facilities rates are double and above the 15% rate recommended WHO rate.

  • Apr 19

    I disagree that there is nothing in it to benefit staff. In many hospitals there are benefits for the staff. It's just that those benefits aren't appreciated by everyone equally.

    Not everyone appreciates financial support for things that lead to career advancement for nurses -- like specialty certification, higher tuition reimbursement, support for conference attendance, for being a presenter at conferences, support for doing poster presentations, publishing, support for staff RN's participating in research, EBP, and quality improvement projects.

    People conveniently forget that in order to be designated as a Magnet hospital, your hospital and staff has to out-perform the benchmarks on both key quality of care measures and staff satisfaction.

    Sure, there are some hospitals that "play the game" by manipulating appearances and not being as good as they make themselves out to be. That is inevitable with any system of recognition. And if the staff is really unhappy, they shouldn't be answering the staff satisfaction surveys in such a positive way ... and letting the Magnet folks know that things are not as good as they appear.

    So yes ... it's not perfect ... but it is unrealistic to expect any system of recognition to be perfect. However overall ... the Magnet program has influenced a lot of hospitals to do some good things that they wouldn't have otherwise done. That has changed the industry's expectations of what should a hospital be doing -- and that is a good thing. So personally, I would like to see the program improved a bit -- but not eliminated. Because if it were eliminated, the good things that have happened because of it would probably go away.

  • Apr 18

    Some stats that support your hypothesis that the main reason for the ever-increasing primary cesarean rate is maternal request.

  • Apr 17

    Quote from Purple_roses
    I personally think it's evident that she doesn't know how to chart properly. What she charted is harmless, but she seems to chart whatever floats into her mind, which is where I personally could see a problem coming into play.

    When someone does not know how to chart something properly, that person may accidentally chart something that could get the floor into legal trouble. One of my instructors addressed this topic this semester. If a lawsuit should ever arise, that charting will be scrutinized for any tiny detail that seems off. Even if nothing "bad" happened on the floor, it's too easy to chart something in an inflammatory manner, and that gets people into trouble.
    I couldn't agree more. In the event of a lawsuit, poor charting (even seemingly innocuous) will sink a facility. There's a reason aides don't do narrative charting in most places and even nurses should have stronger charting skills than many do.

    Nothing tightens my jaws more than medical charting (which is a legal document) that makes the writer appear semi-literate.

  • Apr 17

    I personally think it's evident that she doesn't know how to chart properly. What she charted is harmless, but she seems to chart whatever floats into her mind, which is where I personally could see a problem coming into play.

    When someone does not know how to chart something properly, that person may accidentally chart something that could get the floor into legal trouble. One of my instructors addressed this topic this semester. If a lawsuit should ever arise, that charting will be scrutinized for any tiny detail that seems off. Even if nothing "bad" happened on the floor, it's too easy to chart something in an inflammatory manner, and that gets people into trouble.


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