Content That klone Likes

klone, MSN, RN 82,715 Views

Joined Apr 2, '03 - from 'Oregon'. klone is a L&D. She has '10+' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Women's Health/OB Leadership'. Posts: 11,569 (55% Liked) Likes: 28,453

Sorted By Last Like Given (Max 500)
  • Aug 22

    Quote from RNNPICU
    I vote for a nursing job that pays my bills and gives me vacation days to go exploring places.
    As far as glamorous, I like that I can wear my Dansko's with any outfit and somehow make it work. - That is galm for you.

    Best answer; to add: I have a Dansko clog collection that could get me into Vogue or Glamour.

  • Aug 22

    I'm a midwife; the very epitome of a glamorous profession. It's all cute babies and adoring happy families and cuddling, at least that is what most wannabe midwives think lol.

    There is plenty of that, but also grief and adrenaline and blood and guts. Late nights, painfully long labors, checked out fathers, babies abandoned in the NICU, deeply mourned stillbirths, desperately unwanted pregnancies, abuse and neglect. And you get to help your patients through all of that mess. It really is the most terrible, wonderful job.

  • Aug 21

    Well, go for the LVN now and work part time while getting your ADN. Take is one step at a time. Will take a bit longer, but it will spread out the cost as well as gain experience before moving to the next step.

  • Aug 21

    Quote from whitla242
    I appreciate your advice, it seems like my first two comments are telling me to "suck it up and go for the gold." I can list all of the cons like how I am in $20,000 student loan debt and this will just be more going back to school for years and years. But you both are right if I want it I need to do everything I can do to get it. I know I can do it! I appreciate your attempts to help. I hope more people could be a little more open minded with different options and what they would do.... please keep the comments coming they are wonderful!

    "Open minded" doesn't really matter. Realistic advice is the only thing that matters.

  • Aug 20
  • Aug 20

    No, I don't think you're a jerk. It's sad that the public has such a poor idea of what we do and the media doesn't help one bit. But the self-aggrandizement is the flip side of the same coin and I find it embarrassing. It's like we have to put ourselves on a pedestal if the public forgets to do it for us. It's the whole "calling" school of thought.

    It's nice when we can just educate the public without the drama and embellishment.

  • Aug 19

    Quote from milly
    I don't suppose it's the machine itself that scares me, iv used them in different ways like sliding scale insulin and heparin infusions, with not an ounce of worry.

    The problem comes when it is mixed up with palliative care. Thing being is the vast majority of people who end up with them for that purpose dies. I know there is a school of thought that stat doses and syringe drivers are so very close to euthanasia. That is something that totally adds up when I think about it logically.

    It's not about ego. Or a lack of empathy. I want to be able to sleep at night knowing if do e the best for my patient's i can. And for the record I strongly believe that these patients are the people who we need to advocate for more so than any other. But I also want to be safe and protect both them and my own registration.

    I don't understand how the rules change so much. For instance morphine in a surgical scenario, if respiration rate is below 12 it is contraindicated as it suppresses the breathing further and that is dangerous.. Yet in a palliative scenario it doesnt seem to matter because they are dying any way...

    How do I know that these medications which are very potent and quite a cocktail doesn't play a part in the poor souls demise... I don't know how to wrestle with my conscience on this point. I do indeed plague myself torturing myself wondering if my so called caring act isn't some how killing someone under another guise. And that terrifies me ..I just want to have peace with it. There are hundreds who are incredibly blasea I want to be like that too..
    OP, I mean this in the most gentle way possible - it is not to be rude or to imply that you are a bad nurse. I'm sure you are a fine nurse.

    But...are you sure that palliative care is the right specialty for you? You seem to have a lot of conflict about it. You also don't seem to have a very clear understanding of what palliative care is and what end-of-life care involves. Maybe a different specialty would allow you to have more job satisfaction and better sleep?

  • Aug 19

    What is a syringe driver? Just a pump that infuses syringes of medication, or something else?

  • Aug 18

    Quote from AnnoyedNurse
    All nutrition whether for an adult or infant requires a doctor's order. So yes it is permissible granted there is a doctor's order. Most likely, this nurse did not call the doctor to get an order to feed the infant. You, however, are missing the entire point. The nurse has a role to keep her adult patient pain free and her newborn patient safe during the feeding. A patient on ambien should not be in the bed with an infant. End of story.
    Like all MD orders, a legally competent patient or their decision maker is free to decline to follow those orders, MD orders pertaining to diet and nutrition are more accurately described as suggestions.

  • Aug 18

    When my first kid was born, our nurse gave us a goodie-bag from a formula manufacturer with bottles of formula, coupons, and promotional brochures, I found that pretty astounding at the time but apparently it wasn't unusual. My understanding is that there has been movement away from this promotion of formula unless there is a need for formula, and instead that breastfeeding has been encouraged whenever possible. Maybe I'm wrong, but my understanding is that when it's appropriate, breastfeeding is far superior to formula, so if our job is to promote health then why wouldn't we be encouraging breastfeeding?

  • Aug 18

    Quote from klone
    I have a theory. My observation is that most of the "which is the coolest/most respected area of nursing" posts are from men. Do you guys who are preoccupied by that, feel emasculated by being a nurse, so you need to be in the coolest, most "manly" area of nursing possible?
    I'm a guy, and I agree with this. I notice that a lot of my male colleagues, especially those new to the profession, speak with a lot of superlatives about their work. I remember reading a post a while back in the Men in Nursing forum, where the guy bragged about the "awesome" care that he gave. He was about six months out of school. My thought was that you barely know what you're doing six months in - at least that was the case with me.

  • Aug 18

    Quote from klone
    I think you mean Level 4. Level 1 is a stable newborn nursery.
    To be fair there's lots of ohhs and ahhs in any newborn nursery.

    And probably an ENT clinic also...?

  • Aug 18

    Quote from klone
    I have a theory. My observation is that most of the "which is the coolest/most respected area of nursing" posts are from men. Do you guys who are preoccupied by that, feel emasculated by being a nurse, so you need to be in the coolest, most "manly" area of nursing possible?
    You are so on to me. It's all about image!

    I work with semi-conscious patients so I can implant in them the image I choose. I am THE mostest, coolest nurse cuz I control the ice chips!

    Then they promptly forget all about me. Whaaaat??

  • Aug 18

    Quote from ItsThatJenGirl
    I've heard this too. I was told it had to do with the milk curdling, inducing vomiting.

    It made sense at the time, but I realize now how silly that is.
    I've heard that too...apparently it curdles and causes vomiting at 99°F (which is a fever, you know), but not 98.6°F...

  • Aug 17

    Quote from klone
    I think you mean Level 4. Level 1 is a stable newborn nursery.
    Oop, my bad. The place with the sickest babies.


close