Latest Comments by nurse2033

Latest Comments by nurse2033

nurse2033 16,732 Views

Joined Jun 6, '07. Posts: 1,896 (46% Liked) Likes: 2,783

Sorted By Last Comment (Past 5 Years)
  • 4
    Kitiger, Luckyyou, RunnerKate, and 1 other like this.

    "I'm sorry that happened to you".
    "That sucks".
    "I can't imagine how you must feel".
    "That sounds awful".
    "Is there anything I can do for you?"
    If you feel they would be comfortable, you can put your hand on their arm or shoulder- but no hugs.
    Do not press them, and let them talk if they want to. Make yourself available.

  • 4

    There is only 1 time in the ED- NOW. Do it, chart it, because there is no later. You can never remember everything and if you fall behind you will inevitably leave something out. Unless someone is literally dying, take the time to chart before the next task. Good luck.

  • 0

    Agree! Your resume is NOT a list of jobs you have had. It is a list of jobs and experience that contribute to your skill set. For example, if the job was at a pizza shop, where you worked the same hours, you wouldn't include it on a nursing resume. If it had been a full time job, you would have to explain the job gap. It will hurt you if you apply to the same institution. However, you could still get a job there (maybe), if you can convince them that you have changed your evil ways. And you better square away this calendar issue if you want to make it through nursing school. Good luck.

  • 5
    lifeisnow11, Mellah430, Kssrn404, and 2 others like this.

    There must be ACT prep courses. I would take one if you're not confident. And why do people think 40 is old? I was over 40 when I learned to snowboard, mountain bike, and got 2 nursing degrees. Oh and joined the military. Go for it!

  • 0

    He should be concerned. He is in a specialized field. Each location will have its own challenges, and overseas will be worse. Perhaps he can find a job that contracts with military bases? You might want to prepare for living apart at times, or he may have to have gaps in his career. Another option is the Reserve. You could serve but you wouldn't have to move around all the time.

  • 0

    If you go active duty, as you progress in rank you will progress in management. You couldn't stay at the bedside if you wanted to (there are some exceptions). This is as an RN, I don't know anything about CRNAs. At some point you would need a Masters but not for a while. You do have to pass the PT test every year, you can google the requirements. Good luck.

  • 0

    I would put fixing health care up there with world peace, or ending poverty. You need power to do these things. A lot of it. Get a Masters in Public Health or Social Work, and run for office. Obama has a lot of power, and although he made a big impact in health care, I wouldn't call it fixed. I don't mean to be a downer but there are so many ingrained, moving pieces, that change has to be made on a mega scale.

  • 1
    UTVOL3 likes this.

    My job title is Clinical Educator but I function also as a Staff Developer at times and, (although I try to stay out of it) a bit of Clinical Nurse Specialist. I work at a small hospital and my reach is great. At a much larger organization, my lane would be much more narrow. I would take that into consideration. I have a lot of freedom and flexibility, and love it because of that. As long as I get the job done, everyone is happy. I agree with LLG. Good luck.

  • 0

    This sounds like a serious adult problem! I worked full time through both paramedic and nursing school. I was single, then married. Sometimes you have to bite off more than you can chew, then chew it! There is a path in there somewhere that will work for you. I wouldn't sign a contract to limit work. That might work for the school but not for you. Pick the shortest path to getting your RN. Once you start to work, you will have stability and a decent wage. If you need further education get it later. I went right for the ASN (1 year), then because of a previous BM, was able to cut right to my MSN. Done and done! Good luck.

  • 1
    SeasonedRNhere likes this.

    This practice reeks of the worst kind of bean counting BS. Especially in the ED, where by definition an MCI could occur at any time. At my previous job, we would be overwhelmed by a single full trauma activation because they would downsize. I believe they assume a level of liability for bad outcomes if staffing is low. Let's say a 5 patient crash came in, we simply would have to hope they wouldn't die. It made for a low level of stress I didn't like. This is one of the reasons I quit. Then they would call me to come in on my off days because they were short. I laugh at their incompetence and shortsightedness! Ha!

    At my last, last job, they called me off so much I couldn't take a vacation after 14 months of never taking a day off because I had no PTO. I solved that problem and got my vacation- I quit! So all the money they "saved" by sending me home was spent on training a new person.

    I believe I have a "contract" with the job for them to provide me predictable work, and me to do it. I'm a professional. I can't "downsize" my mortgage or health insurance payments. Calling people off is basically treating them like they are on call at all times, or, as an expendable component. This leads to zero loyalty. A better alternative, is to offer anyone who wants to go, to go home. Or, to offer you other work, such as administrative, so you can get your hours. It's a tempting solution for managers, but like other easy fixes, it creates a lot of problems like low retention, low loyalty, and low quality work.

  • 1
    Pixie.RN likes this.

    What no Excelsior? They are one of the oldest, best, cheapest, and largest.

  • 0

    I got mine through Excelsior and loved it. Non-Synchronous, relatively cheap, and I thought it was very effective and high quality.

  • 0

    I've had some success with Surveymonkey. They are a free service you can use for surveys. Create a short, simple survey on what your staff want to learn, then follow up with a lot of face to face requests. This is only one avenue to use, but you can learn a lot by just asking. Good luck.

  • 8

    I find it interesting you that you got dinged for your user name... It is telling that you have received the same feedback from multiple sources. In my experience it's probably valid. I did a little research on know-it-all and I recommend you do the same. It's not about knowing, it's about how the other person feels. You can be smart and knowledgeable without making the other person feel stupid. This is where I would focus. Think back about something you might have said that was condescending. Good luck.

  • 2
    SRDAVIS and llg like this.

    Yes, per semester. A recent study showed that the system can't pay a reasonable rate to adjuncts. Read it here Study says too costly to pay adjuncts more.
    Being an adjunct is a great way to get experience, but not to make a living. Another study showed that it takes 4-40 hours to produce 1 hour of effective education. If you can find a class and teach it forever, that will be worthwhile. But taking new classes will kill you in prep time.


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