Latest Comments by nurse2033

nurse2033 19,099 Views

Joined Jun 6, '07. Posts: 1,954 (46% Liked) Likes: 2,876

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    There are a ton of hospitals in the area. UC Health and Banner have a good old hospital arms race going on. They keep building into the other's catchment area. I would avoid Longmont, UC Health is building a new hospital in Longmont and will likely crush them. I've worked in 2 of these systems. Cheyenne is also an easy commute. Ratios are not mandated in Colorado but are reasonable. Most hospitals use 4-6 MS, 4 ED, 1-2 ICU, 2-3 Step-down. You should be able to get a job. Good luck.

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    It's impossible to tell if someone purposely misled you or not, but it doesn't really matter. If you want to serve, you should sign, unless being in the IRR will be a deal breaker. In the current state I doubt anyone is being activated from IRR. But world events can change at any time. We all could be recalled to active duty at any time, for as long as needed. If you aren't willing to accept that, it probably isn't a good fit. I signed a similar 3 year contract 6 years ago and have no plans on leaving. Good luck.

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    Yes, I know a lot of nurses that work part time in the hospital and have side jobs. One works for a dermatologist for the drastically reduced cosmetic procedures. I know another that teaches TNCC on the side. I wanted to add that not all hospitals allow nurses to rotate between units, in fact I think it is rather unusual. But it is a huge benefit giving more staffing flexibility and clinical expertise.

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    I happen to have seen a video in which Christie tells a powerful story about a close friend of his who was undone by prescription narcotics. His friend was a classmate of his; professional, athlete, with wife, kids, house in the suburbs ect. His friend ended up dying homeless, literally the worst case outcome. Although I don't agree with a politician necessarily dipping into this pool, his story makes his passion for this issue clear. It's a bold move and I will be interested to see how it affects this issue.

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    Quote from chare
    Wow! And they call us intolerant and non-inclusive.
    wait, who is us?

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    Cola89 likes this.

    I work with a number of nurses who rotate between ED and ICU.

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    Culture change must have new leadership, and separation of the worst offenders. The most obvious change is a new manager, who will have to fight the old culture. Some staff may get fired, but hopefully most will leave. But sometimes the staff is entrenched, circles the wagons, and frags the new manager. I was told by a manager once, flat out, that she was at war with the old guard, who liked their power and culture, and were complaining to the director (waging a smear campaign) against her. She told me she was actively looking for a new job and would bail at the earliest opportunity. For her to be so frank was amazing, and showed the level of rancor. Each situation is different. Change can occur, but sometimes it can be very difficult. The fact that the director tolerates, or can't do anything about it is telling. If they don't know, they are incompetent. Either way, unless you can get the manager job, and the support of higher leadership, it is probably worth it to move on. Good luck.

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    I have experienced the hyper-controlling family myself, but in the hospital. We had to get administration involved. But you have no such depth of assistance. If my manager laughed at me for a serious concern I had, that would be the end of that relationship. I would immediately look for another job. If you want to persevere, understand that the family's reaction is understandable given the nightmare situation they are in. This is one adaptation people will take. Don't take it personally! You have to create a professional space in which to work, creating some distance from your feelings and ego. Not everyone can do this. You can't control what people do, but you control how you react to it. Google "inspirational quotes"... Good luck.

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    nicktexas likes this.

    Yes, AE units are the backbone of the AE system of course. You can't do AE without us, and you can't have troops across the globe without AE. We are all in a bucket and deploy on a regular cycle, about every 20 months. In fact, that's one of the best things about AE, you will perform the mission you train for. There are only 3 active duty AE units, so 90% of AE is done by Guard and Reserve units.

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    I got an MSN at Excelsior with a focus in education. I really enjoyed the program and felt it prepared me well. I have worked both as a BSN primary nursing instructor at a brick and mortar school, and teach online. I work primarily in Professional Development now. I agree with the other poster that a specialization in Professional Development is probably overdue although I fell "slightly put out" about it, not "furious". My degree allows me to do both.

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    I don't think they have Aeromedical Evacuation unit, so you would be a clinic nurse. If they have an AE unit you could be a flight nurse. Deployments vary a lot depending on the unit they are in.

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    I would have started both, carefully, with a bag of saline and hopefully large bore IV at the ready.

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    Keep pestering the recruiter. They are notoriously non-responsive. Being a nurse, he has the best chance for a waiver (vs. security forces for example), but it all depends on their need. Good luck.

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    To answer your question, the laws on ratios are in California. Sad but true.


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