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nurse2033 25,031 Views

Joined Jun 6, '07. Posts: 2,101 (46% Liked) Likes: 3,038

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  • Jan 17

    Yes, the ER is stressful. That's why we like it. You will be thrown from task to task, it's great. Good luck.

  • Jan 5

    Yes, violation

  • Dec 19 '17

    Sorry, that moniker is already is use by military medics and paramedics. In fact there is already a movement in EMS to refer to all responders as medics. This is to allay the confusion that currently exists in the public's minds between EMTs, paramedics, first responders, EMT Intermediates, fire medics and so on. Lets not confuse the public further...

    I wish you luck in getting over this obstacle. I've been a nurse for six years and not only have I never been mistaken for a woman, no one has ever batted an eye when I told them I was a nurse. Maybe it's a geographic or generational thing but sex never seems to be an issue with my coworkers or my patients. As more men enter nursing it will evolve to include us.

  • Dec 18 '17

    Sucks to be her. Narcs tend to slow peristalsis so they would be bad in general for gastroparesis. Whether she is seeking or not is not for us to judge. I would doubt she is throwing up her food on purpose, but probably there is an emotional component to her problem. I agree with the other poster that NG tube should be given for gastric rest. Yet another patient that is being poorly managed and coming to the ER in distress. Find a cure for that and I'll be your servant for a year.

  • Dec 16 '17

    The cost of a toxic employee is very high, both in morale and retention. Although unpleasant, you or the manager should counsel the employee, keep records, and fire them if there is no change.

  • Dec 11 '17

    I don't work in your specialty but I've had rough patches in my career. Hating my job was one... You need to adjust your attitude. I don't mean you have a bad attitude, but you need to look at your job in a different way. Since what you are doing isn't working for you, do something different. I started to focus on my own internal compass of what I felt was a good day, not what I was receiving from my dysfunctional workplace. My problem was management, not the patients, but it took me a long time to readjust so I could at least, not hate going to work. Every job has its ups and downs so this skill will serve you well over your career. Look for makes you feel good at work and focus on that. If there is truly nothing, ask yourself what would be different in a different environment. Sometimes leaving is the best choice, but not the only one. I hope that helps...

  • Dec 4 '17

    Forget about old school references, employers what to know how you are performing now. It doesn't have to be a friend. But if you can't come up with at least one person at your job who thinks you do a good job, you have a problem you need to work on. Just ask someone with whom you are friendly. Three is normal. Ideally your supervisor and two coworkers. Good luck.

  • Nov 26 '17

    The cost of a toxic employee is very high, both in morale and retention. Although unpleasant, you or the manager should counsel the employee, keep records, and fire them if there is no change.

  • Nov 25 '17
  • Nov 22 '17

    Don't do it. If you truly made an error it should have been caught long ago by agency chart review. If their review process is lacking or absent that is not your problem. How can you even remember what happened? I can't remember patients from the start of my shift. Unless you were negligent, and you have full recall of the situation, I would not do this.

  • Nov 22 '17

    Quote from maxthecat
    All of us nurses on the unit I work on are currently on a "plan of correction." This is because a state surveyor found that nurses were holding meds with no written parameters based on the nurses experience and education. The surveyor stated that this is practicing outside of scope. We must contact the doctor immediately and get an order from them as to whether to hold or not. For example, if we get a BP of 89/59, we cannot decide to hold the med on our own, we must obtain an order from the physician. We must also contact the physician immediately if a patient refuses a med, and obtain an order as to what the physician wants done. We had been making these decisions on our own and letting the doctor know in the morning, but this is not acceptable according to the surveyor. So we have been trying to educate our physicians to write parameters on their orders if they don't want to get several phone calls every day. They are loving this new policy--not. And I guess I've been practicing out of scope for years!

    I thought that "don't kill your patient" was a standing order It would seem that the facility medical director could write standard parameters for common meds, and docs could write their own that would override the standard ones when they chose.

  • Nov 20 '17

    Don't do it. If you truly made an error it should have been caught long ago by agency chart review. If their review process is lacking or absent that is not your problem. How can you even remember what happened? I can't remember patients from the start of my shift. Unless you were negligent, and you have full recall of the situation, I would not do this.

  • Nov 19 '17

    It's only too late if you think so. If you are done growing, then yes. I was over 40 when I became a nurse, joined the military, learned to snowboard and mountain bike. Try to keep up junior...

  • Nov 12 '17

    Don't do it. If you truly made an error it should have been caught long ago by agency chart review. If their review process is lacking or absent that is not your problem. How can you even remember what happened? I can't remember patients from the start of my shift. Unless you were negligent, and you have full recall of the situation, I would not do this.

  • Nov 12 '17

    I hate to nitpick but there is no nurses' oath. I happen to agree with "do no harm", but it is not an oath that nurses take.


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