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nurse2033 21,504 Views

Joined Jun 6, '07. Posts: 2,034 (46% Liked) Likes: 2,956

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  • Jul 19

    At my ED we are just embarking on a new project to decrease narcotic use in the ED. Safe injection and needle exchanges are a part of the program. There is ethically no way to withhold advocacy for reduction in harm to our patients. A culture change that addiction is a disease and not a personal failing needs to take place. It does not help that these patients don't tend to be very much fun, but this is our job.

  • Jul 16

    Look at your home. Is; A) everything in it's place, neat and tidy? Or B) functional but messy? A)=ICU B)=ED

  • Jul 9

    Quote from Emergent
    I personally don't think the Ed is an effective way to counter the ever increasing demands to solve a myriad of social problems that we are being asked to address during a triage. I really think this type of outreach belongs in a different setting.

    The ED triage is supposed to be a focused assessment to deal with the problem at hand. Often there are people accompanying the patient, which makes it impossible to ask the very personal questions that we are supposed to ask. The blue dot idea is clever, but word of this will spread like wildfire. It will hardly be a secret.

    I find, the more questions I'm forced to asked during triage that aren't relevant to the case at hand, the less effective the whole thing becomes.

    If a woman (or man) comes in with signs of abuse, the protocol should be that no other person is allowed in the room, and a very frank, real discussion should be had. This is a commonsense approached that, unfortunately, is lacking today. Instead we like to cast a wide net, by asking everyone a bunch of screening questions, but we rarely catch any fish that way...
    Many trafficking victims are seen by health care professionals and unrecognized as victims. All health care workers should be aware of the signs of trafficking and know what to do.

  • Jul 9

    This is a short training video, feel free to share Human Trafficking Awareness - YouTube

  • Jul 9

    Quote from Emergent
    I personally don't think the Ed is an effective way to counter the ever increasing demands to solve a myriad of social problems that we are being asked to address during a triage. I really think this type of outreach belongs in a different setting.

    The ED triage is supposed to be a focused assessment to deal with the problem at hand. Often there are people accompanying the patient, which makes it impossible to ask the very personal questions that we are supposed to ask. The blue dot idea is clever, but word of this will spread like wildfire. It will hardly be a secret.

    I find, the more questions I'm forced to asked during triage that aren't relevant to the case at hand, the less effective the whole thing becomes.

    If a woman (or man) comes in with signs of abuse, the protocol should be that no other person is allowed in the room, and a very frank, real discussion should be had. This is a commonsense approached that, unfortunately, is lacking today. Instead we like to cast a wide net, by asking everyone a bunch of screening questions, but we rarely catch any fish that way...
    Many trafficking victims are seen by health care professionals and unrecognized as victims. All health care workers should be aware of the signs of trafficking and know what to do.

  • Jul 8

    This is a short training video, feel free to share Human Trafficking Awareness - YouTube

  • Jul 7

    This is a short training video, feel free to share Human Trafficking Awareness - YouTube

  • Jul 5

    What a load. Of. Crap. Maybe the author is speaking about the men who are not nurses. I guess the men who don't want to be nurses, aren't. Just like the men who don't want to be lumberjacks, aren't. Hmmmmmm... brilliant! Just for the record, I am and know plenty of men who do want to be nurses.

  • Jul 3

    What a load. Of. Crap. Maybe the author is speaking about the men who are not nurses. I guess the men who don't want to be nurses, aren't. Just like the men who don't want to be lumberjacks, aren't. Hmmmmmm... brilliant! Just for the record, I am and know plenty of men who do want to be nurses.

  • Jul 1

    Enlistment is for enlisted, commissioning if for officers. Nurses are officers. You need a Bachelor degree to commission. You can't work as a nurse as enlisted so don't do that. The two tier system might be hard for civilians to understand. But basically, officers are the manager and directors (leaders), and enlisted are the hands-on heros, and higher ranking enlisted lead other enlisted.

    To answer your question, you would commission as a officer. Then go to officer school, then a speciality school if entering a specialty nursing field. As a reserve or guardsman the military is drawing on your civilian experience and expects you know how to be a nurse. Thusly, they won't be training you how to be a nurse. If you are going to be a flight nurse, they will give you flight nurse training, for example.

  • Jul 1

    Pay depends a lot on where you work. ED work is a lot safer than EMS, so not quite as interesting. Although, you probably have a higher chance of being physically assaulted. I am a paramedic to nurse. I miss the uncertainty of 911, but it is more intellectually and interpersonally challenging at the same time. And, nursing is a tremendous career with a myriad of possibilities in saving lives like the ED or cath lab, to some real power as a manager, director, or CNO. If you geek out on new opportunities it might be a good fit. ED nursing is a team endeavor and you will never need the same reliance on your individual skill and knowledge as in the field, but it has rewards that go beyond that. Good luck.

  • Jul 1

    Pay depends a lot on where you work. ED work is a lot safer than EMS, so not quite as interesting. Although, you probably have a higher chance of being physically assaulted. I am a paramedic to nurse. I miss the uncertainty of 911, but it is more intellectually and interpersonally challenging at the same time. And, nursing is a tremendous career with a myriad of possibilities in saving lives like the ED or cath lab, to some real power as a manager, director, or CNO. If you geek out on new opportunities it might be a good fit. ED nursing is a team endeavor and you will never need the same reliance on your individual skill and knowledge as in the field, but it has rewards that go beyond that. Good luck.

  • Jun 30

    What a load. Of. Crap. Maybe the author is speaking about the men who are not nurses. I guess the men who don't want to be nurses, aren't. Just like the men who don't want to be lumberjacks, aren't. Hmmmmmm... brilliant! Just for the record, I am and know plenty of men who do want to be nurses.

  • Jun 30

    Look at your home. Is; A) everything in it's place, neat and tidy? Or B) functional but messy? A)=ICU B)=ED

  • Jun 29

    Your unit has made it clear they don't want to hear it, despite their false assertions otherwise. Go by what you have observed in their behavior, not what they give lip service to. It also shows the level of integrity in the unit. You need to get your foot in by completing your first year. Focus on learning, protect your license, and keep your eyes open for better opportunities. Good luck.


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