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Joined Jun 6, '07. Posts: 1,977 (47% Liked) Likes: 2,904

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  • Mar 28

    Quote from deni_an
    I've thought about the "What are your weaknesses" question a lot.

    My weakness is I can't stand people who don't vaccinate their children, with their ignorance they are literally hurting society (herd immunity) and therefore hurting me or my future children.

    But I realize that is their freedom, and just because I don't respect you or your decisions doesn't mean I won't treat you with respect. I'll give you (and your children) the same care that I would give any other patient. But I won't be happy about it. :/

    I'll have to figure out a way to portray that in an interview. I think it is a valid answer though, at some point we'll all have to treat child molesters, murderers, drug users, or simply just rude people - our level of care cannot change when if we don't like someone. Luckily we don't have to be their friend we just have to help them get well.
    I would say you are passionate about being an advocate for immunization. "Can't stand" a paying customer is not a strong quality to show in an interview.

  • Mar 28

    Quote from NayRN
    My interviews have been nothing like this. I was prepared for these questions. I'd done my research. I'd had deep thoughts on the mission, vision, and values of the company. The questions I was asked include:
    1. Identify a time when you were distressed by your ability to provide care for a patient within the constraints of the health care system and maintained a relationship with the patient afterwards. What happened? What is the patient doing now?
    This one threw me. I told of a time when I had a patient who was uninsured and not a citizen, and they were given emergency care and were stabilized in the hospital, but the docs were unwilling to provide the $25,000 surgery to fix their broken bone. I discharged them that way. I understood the business logistics of the situation, but as a nurse, it stunk to watch that patient walking out of the hospital still broken. No I did not maintain a relationship with the patient because I draw professional boundaries in my care and do not become personally involved with patients as a general rule.

    2. Identify a time when you had a problem with a coworker. What happened, and how did it turn out.
    I told about a time when I was a new nurse, and the charge nurse took my statement of "I have no idea if I can take a new patient right now, we need to ask my preceptor" wrong-I think she thought I was challenging her authority, or maybe my tone was just wrong. Anyway, after she walked off in a huff, I chased her down the hallway and apologized for my statement coming out wrong. 3 years later, she was one of the nurses who gave me a personal reference for this new job. Happy ending.

    3. Tell of a time you failed at something. What was it, and how did it turn out.
    I discussed a med error I had made. It was minor, and resulted in no harm, but an error all the same. I considered it a failure of many things including a stressful work environment and simple human nature. I related how it made me much more vigilant when checking medications, and how I consider it a success if I don't make the same or similar error again. I discussed how I have a hard time with the definition of failure because in my eyes the only "failure" is giving up. As long as something is learned from a mistake, it can never be considered a complete failure.

    There were several more questions, very open ended, but tailored to very specific circumstances. I felt good about it afterwards. I paid a lot of attention to my appearance and body language. It was a difficult interview, and I didn't get the job. The interviewer told me she would let me know either way by the end of the week. This was several weeks ago, and I never heard anything. I'm not sure what to think. Anyone else had an interview like this?
    I have had many similar questions. I would never admit to med error though, this could be the single reason you didn't get the job. I know, we are supposed to report, and management is supposed to give us an award for feeling safe and being honest. I'm not saying don't report med errors, but it is not something I would bring up in an interview.

  • Mar 27

    You didn't list your job but I'm assuming staff nurse. Speak to the nurses who are doing this directly and tell them you don't think it's safe. You could speak to the boss, without naming names, and say you believe some education or reinforcement in this area would be warranted. That doesn't mean anything will happen though. You are responsible for your own practice, and doing what you can to ensure safety. Leaving pills is, of course, not safe practice. Don't do it yourself, and do what you can to influence others. But in the end, it is not your responsibility to police the practice of other nurses (unless they commit a reportable offense of course).

  • Mar 26

    This must be a young man's problem because no one has ever made a statement like that to me. You could have said A. times have changed, B. I'm not gay so I guess that doesn't apply, or C. Sorry you missed such a great opportunity. When people asks me about nursing I say I love serving my community, helping people when they are down, and saving a life is a hoot! You need to be 100% non apologetic. Take every opportunity to tell people with confidence, "I'm a nurse!". Don't explain or elaborate. And, don't confuse caring for people with manly endeavors, they are just different sides of you. For example, fathers provide caring for their kids, just with a different flavor from Mom. It is not better or worse. Good luck!

  • Feb 22

    Work your shifts in a row, sleep late on day 1, get up after 4-5 hours of sleep on the last day. Go to bed immediately when you get home, if possible. I can't stress this next point enough... ready??? Blackout curtains, ear plugs, and white noise. This combo seriously changed my life.

  • Feb 21

    If you aren't willing to cover it for work, get it closer to your core.

  • Feb 20

    Work your shifts in a row, sleep late on day 1, get up after 4-5 hours of sleep on the last day. Go to bed immediately when you get home, if possible. I can't stress this next point enough... ready??? Blackout curtains, ear plugs, and white noise. This combo seriously changed my life.

  • Feb 20

    Work your shifts in a row, sleep late on day 1, get up after 4-5 hours of sleep on the last day. Go to bed immediately when you get home, if possible. I can't stress this next point enough... ready??? Blackout curtains, ear plugs, and white noise. This combo seriously changed my life.

  • Feb 17

    Standing orders are a nice idea. We can order tests and medications, including narcotics. It sounds like it would be a big reach for a facility that doesn't seem to care much about patient pain though. But every challenge is an opportunity!

  • Feb 14

    I went paramedic (still am) to RN. Has worked out great for me. Good luck.

  • Feb 11

    I would have started both, carefully, with a bag of saline and hopefully large bore IV at the ready.

  • Feb 11

    Standing orders are a nice idea. We can order tests and medications, including narcotics. It sounds like it would be a big reach for a facility that doesn't seem to care much about patient pain though. But every challenge is an opportunity!

  • Feb 8

    Medscape is my crush. It is the fastest way to get drug information. There is no prohibition on me having my phone on me. I also have the NHS Stroke Scale app, which again is the fastest way to reference and calculate a stroke scale.

  • Feb 8

    Medscape is my crush. It is the fastest way to get drug information. There is no prohibition on me having my phone on me. I also have the NHS Stroke Scale app, which again is the fastest way to reference and calculate a stroke scale.

  • Feb 7

    patient chilling watching Greys Anatomy


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