Latest Comments by AnnieOaklyRN

Latest Comments by AnnieOaklyRN

AnnieOaklyRN, BSN, RN, EMT-P 16,457 Views

Joined Oct 24, '06. AnnieOaklyRN is a RN, Paramedic. She has 'Previously ER RN, 17 years in EMS (yes, I still love it) , IV RN 8 months!' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'IV RN, (911) Paramedic'. Posts: 1,875 (30% Liked) Likes: 1,853

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    Not quite, BUT I did get an interview for the CICU, I guess they liked me enough during the shadow! I really LOVED the unit and the people so I am really hoping I do get the job... I am glad I did not get hired into the ED as I don't think I would have been happy. I already did the ER and hated it after a while!


    The CICU let me do hands on assessments etc and didn't seem to be bothered that I wasn't afraid to help out! I know part of it was them assessing my skill level too, but they weren't put off by it like the ER maybe was.


    Annie

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    Well this worked out better than i thought!!! I guess everything does happen for a reason!

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    Thanks everyone! I have been studying congenital heart abnormalities and all sorts of stuff so that I am prepared to ask appropriate questions etc. I hope it goes well, as this would be a wonderful opportunity!

    Annie

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    Hi,

    just wondering if you think I should bring my stethoscope to a RN Shadow for a potential job?

    The job is in a CICU, so I would imagine it would be a great opportunity to hear some abnormal heart sounds, but I don't want to over step!

    Any suggestions?

    Annie

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    ok, thanks!

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    Hi all,

    I am shadowing in a pediatric CICU next week and was just looking to get advise on how to make the best impression?

    Should I just stand by an observe or should I try and help in whatever way I can (not doing invasive stuff of course)? Anything specific I should read up on, other than congenital cardiac stuff?

    Thanks for any info!

    Annie

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    blondy2061h likes this.

    Hi,

    As you said it all depends on the age, how they died or a presumed cause of the cardiac arrest (if it was trauma we tend to work them for less time since they are not going to come back no matter what you do), and if they are responding to medications and other interventions, and more importantly how long their down time was, especially if it was without CPR. Pupils will also play a factor, if they are fixed and dilated, they are essentially brain dead.

    Where I work on the ambulance we work them for 20-25 minutes at home and then call it, but obviously we use our judgement and tools (end tidal CO2, cardiac monitor etc) in every case. I also talk to the family first before termination to get an idea about how they feel about leaving their loved one at home, and surprisingly most of them would rather avoid the hospital if the patient is not responding to ACLS interventions. i do give them the option for either or. Obviously if they have signs that they have been down to long we do not initiate efforts at all.

    Hope this helps!

    Annie

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    Leonardsmom likes this.

    If it is liquid at room temperature it counts as fluid. Ie Jello etc. If it is solid at room temperature it counts as a solid.

    Annie

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    Hi,

    I didn't get the job, BUT I am shadowing in their CICU next week and if all goes well I will have and interview! Super nervous. I guess I will hold back and not try and play nurse, I will just observe. Thanks for all the advise.

    Annie

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    Hi all,

    I am scheduled to shadow next week in a pediatric CICU, are there any tips you can offer me to be successful?

    I shadowed in the same hospitals ER a few months ago and did not get the job, and I am not sure if it was because I wasn't afraid to help out etc. Should I just stand back and observe or should I help without doing anything invasive?

    I know I have to research cardiac defects etc, anything else you can think of?

    Thanks!

    Annie

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    Janey496 likes this.

    I know you are young, but please take into account all the debt you are going to accumulate with all of this schooling. You may not feel the impact now, but you you will when you can't afford to pay rent or a mortgage because all of your money is going to student loans.

    As an example if you choose to repay a 60,000 dollar loan over 20 years your payments are 500.00 a month. If you go to school for the amount of things you want to your debt will be 2-3 times that!!!

    School can be fun, but you have to remember it costs a ton of money!! I am not sure what your financial situation is, if you have parents or family willing to help you pay for it, but please keep your financial future in mind!

    Annie

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    brownbook, BelleRN50, and nlitened like this.

    You should always fill the drip chamber before priming the tubing, otherwise yes you will get air in the line. This isn't a huge issue if you are talking about a gravity hung IV going through a peripheral IV. However if it involves a pump, you will have to listen to a lot of beeping if there is to much air in the line. Also you want to avoid any significant air in the line going through a central line.

    Some air going through the IV line isn't going to harm the patient. When I was an EMT about to transport a labor and delivery patient down to a tertiary care facility with a nurse, I watched the nurse prime the whole line of air INTO the patient. Nothing happened. Remember you have gasses regularly diffusing into the your blood in your pulmonary circuit, so it can be absorbed. It would take a lot to do serious harm.

    But never be complacent, always do you best to the get the air out; however don't panic if only a small amount is in the line.

    Respiked bag fatal for child: coroner | Mackay Daily Mercury

    Annie

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    Sounds good, except a HUGE majority, if not all of the Boston hospitals will not hire you without at least a BSN.

    Annie

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