Latest Comments by AnnieOaklyRN

AnnieOaklyRN, BSN, RN, EMT-P 22,605 Views

Joined Oct 24, '06. AnnieOaklyRN is a RN, Paramedic. She has 'Previously ER RN, 17 years in EMS (yes, I still love it) , IV RN 8 months!' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'IV RN, (911) Paramedic'. Posts: 2,018 (32% Liked) Likes: 2,242

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  • 2
    JustMe54 and brownbook like this.

    As others have said it never goes away!

    My poor aunt was an RN and she died about 15 years ago and her name and license still show, although expired of course.

    Annie

  • 1
    poppycat likes this.

    I think that person is probably confused perhaps and I would ask someone in charge of the RN program!

    Annie

  • 1
    brownbook likes this.

    I would renew because that will probably be cheaper and easier than retaking the entire class again!

    Good luck

    Annie

  • 4
    LikeTheDeadSea, Flare, moreoreo, and 1 other like this.

    Hi,

    Just an FYI I found a squirrel who obviously had a broken back and was totally paralyzed dragging itself along the side of the road. I brought it to a local vet to be euthanized and they did it for free without question!

    Vets take an oath too and most of them are compassionate enough to provide euthanasia to even a wild animal that is suffering!

    Annie

  • 4

    1) if you had the time to go chase down "Jen" you had the time to wrap the IV!

    2) I agree with some others you made a big mistake stopping her from leaving, don't do that to people as some may take that as you being an aggressor, even if you don't see it that way.

    Annie

  • 1
    HermioneG likes this.

    Chest compressions in an unconscious and presumably choking child are performed to both circulate blood and in an attempt to dislodge the FB from the airway!

  • 2
    JustBeachyNurse and HermioneG like this.

    The heimlich maneuver is not used on an unconscious person!

    This is because they don't want you making the ASSUMPTION that the child was choking! If they were not choking and you spend 2-3 minutes doing the hemlock, when in fact they are in cardiac arrest from a non-choking event they will be brain dead before you start compressions.

    Also someone who is choking will not immediately go unconscious, thus this leads us to believe this child was having some other event. If the child was coughing they did not have a complete airway obstruction, although a partial airway obstruction can turn into a complete obstruction of course. Also when people first go into tacky arrhythmia's the body can make you cough in an attempt to stimulate the vagus nerve.

    Even if you believe a child is choking chest compressions are used as a form to dislodge the foreign body, once unconscious, followed by attempts at rescue breaths, to see if you can at least get some air to them, and again just in case they were not actually choking or if you partially dislodged the FB.

    Annie

  • 2
    Paws2people and caliotter3 like this.

    It was nurse's week?? Who knew....

    Annie

  • 3

    To much liability!

    If you are just going as a parent and not expected to provided health related care or advise that's good, but I would not say you are willing to take the "nurse" role on this trip, as you will not be covered for liability and why take the risk!!!

    Annie

  • 0

    Quote from JustWandering78
    Any updates OP? Did you get a nicu job?

    Hi,

    Nope, I gave up! The job market here just isn't conducive it seams. They either want new grads ( I am guessing because they can start fresh and not have to pay them as a ten year nurse) or they want someone with experience.

    Thank you for asking though.

    Annie

  • 0

    Good luck!!

  • 0

    Just keep in mind, your parents may be willing to support you right now, but not forever!

    Eventually you will be on your own with rent or a mortgage, car payment, utility bills, and add expensive student loan payments to that on new nurse pay and you may be in a struggle!

    I suggest you figure out what each school will cost you and use a school loan calculator to figure out what your monthly payments will be! Remember too you may eventually want to go back of your graduate degree which may be impossible if you are alread paying to much in loans!

    Annie

  • 2
    poppycat and AJJKRN like this.

    Hi,

    If a person is awake enough to eat and drink they do not need a nasal airway in.

    This is going to sound blunt, but that doctor is a moron! He is going to increase the chances that she actually aspirates her food and drink. What is he thinking???? A nasal airway is not going to have any effect on a patient coughing up thick mucous from the lower airways, the point of a nasal airway is to help open up an airway for an OBTUNDED patient!

    I would seriously stop feeding this patient until the nasal airway is removed!


    Annie

  • 8
    nursiebean, Zyprexa, NRSKarenRN, and 5 others like this.

    Hi,

    When a patient is having an inferior MI, you should always do a right sided EKG ( V3, V4, and V5 on the right) PRIOR to giving NTG. The right ventricle is very dependent on after load and preload especially if its infarcting, thus as another poster eluded you should be giving fluids to the patient, not NTG, after you assess lung sounds of course. Also the right sided leads will not have crazy amounts of elevation, and it can be very vague because the right ventricle is a lot smaller than the left ventricle, thus the waves are smaller.

    That was rather negligent to begin patient care with NTG before he had an EKG or IV in place! Please don't ever let that happen again. Tell you clinicians to read the research, as NTG has never been proven to lessen morbidity or mortality in MIs! Morphine has been shown to INCREASE mortality. If a narcotic needs to be given, which in most cases it can help calm the patient and take the edge off, Fentanyl should be given instead of Morphine, especially if a STEMI with right side involvement is present.

    Please encourage your nurse manager to provide increased education on the management of STEMIs and chest pain patients, as it would seem the knowledge is lacking, or at least that is the picture you are painting.


    Annie

  • 0

    Hi,

    Be understanding of your new facility, as they do not yet know your capabilities and they do not want to risk patient safety if they start you off with critically ill patients that you are not ready for. You may know or think you are ready for them, but they do not know you and do not know that you are ready just yet.

    In other words, try and be patient, even when you are bored. Be proactive and in your down time, if you have some, start reading or looking up diagnosis information for the patients you frequently receive.

    Annie


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