Latest Comments by AnnieOaklyRN

AnnieOaklyRN, BSN, RN, EMT-P 23,519 Views

Joined Oct 24, '06. AnnieOaklyRN is a RN, Paramedic. She has 'Previously ER RN, 17 years in EMS (yes, I still love it) , IV RN 8 months!' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'IV RN, (911) Paramedic'. Posts: 2,039 (32% Liked) Likes: 2,326

Sorted By Last Comment (Max 500)
  • 0

    Quote from HeySis
    Since hospice patients are under medical care with a diagnosis that is expected to be fatal in 6 months or less, an autopsy will not be performed. (There could be cases where there has been an exception, I have never heard of one, but there could be. If anyone knows of such a case, I'd be super interested in hearing about it.)

    So yes, removing devices is part of normal post-mortem care, and we would do this, give bed bath, change linens, redress and make sure the body is in a natural (and flat) position before rigor mortis sets in. We would normally allow family a few minutes before the care, if they are already present. And definitely some time after the care is done before we call the funeral home to come and collect the body.
    You have to call the Medical examiner for EVERY death, it doesn't matter what they died from or whether or not they were in hospice!

    Annie

  • 8

    As a previous poster eluded too you need to make sure the person is declined by the medical examiner and the family isn't requesting an autopsy BEFORE you remove anything, once the body is declined then remove them per your facilities policy.

    Annie

  • 0

    Hi,

    I work on an IV team and we do not have an observation period after PICC insertion. Generally we are in the room for another ten minutes or so after insertion cleaning up the mess and putting the signs above the patients bed. We order the chest X-ray and make sure it's placed correctly, then we will put a clear dressing on it, and possibly remove the guide wire if it was left in place, and move it if need be and then it can be used.

    There is a risk of arrhythmia if the tip is in the right atrium instead of the vena cava, but we monitor the patient's rhythm during insertion so that shouldn't be an issue unless it migrates after the fact. Also there is a very small risk of bleeding at the site, but that is generally minimal.


    Annie

  • 0

    Quote from harrird
    Thanks for taking the time to reply, I really appreciate it!

    Both my parents were firefighter/medics. My mother was one of the first women in the state. I was an explorer in high school and actually did CPR for the first time in the back of an ambulance at 15 years old. That being said I realize none of that is a substitute for real scene work (which I would love to do). Here's my problem. I work. A lot. From what I can tell I could take a semester class to obtain EMT-B (keep in mind, I've taught EMT-P students for several years now as an ER nurse) but I really don't understand what I would learn driving the truck or administering O2 while taking vital signs for $10/hr.

    I would love the opportunity to get some training at the paramedic level, ie intubations - and I've seriously considered flying out to Nebraska for a couple of weeks to take the Creighton program. I would have no problem taking classes on scene management, extrication, etc. But EMT-B seems absolutely pointless to me.

    You're absolutely correct on the weight issue. It's important, and something I need to address. 220 is about as light as I could go though.

    What would your thoughts on the Creighton program be? If I went and got an EMT-P after a couple weeks work? Honestly I would probably be happy to take a pay cut to work some PRN in the field as a medic, I wouldn't want to do it for long but I think 6 months would be ok, and if it allowed me to be a better resource or give me a better shot at landing a flight job it would totally be worth it. Free time is just very valuable to me right now, and I would want it to mean something when I applied.

    The problem might be that you don't see the value that EMS experience would bring you, and yes, even as an EMT basic!

    Take it from someone who has worked in both fields, they are two different ball games, and you are missing vital pre-hospital experience. Nursing, in my opinion, at least in the hospital is lacking in autonomy and that may be a concern. In the helicopter there is no doctor to tell you what to do (well, except maybe over the phone, but that is by what your assessment is, not his/hers).

    Don't think being an EMT basic is beneath you, because that sounds a little cocky to me. Go get your EMTB and do some work on an ambulance and do some learning with regards to the out of hospital environment first, and then go get your paramedic license once you have some BLS experience. I think this would help you a lot!!


    Annie

  • 0

    Hi,

    IM does work better and you avoid the the risk of vomiting the medication back up! Just to add to the post I don't think you should be mixing medication with juice because if the child doesn't drink all the juice they don't get all the medication and you have no idea how much they actually got.

    Give the medication by itself in a syringe or allow the parent to do it while you watch and then give them a little juice or a popsicle to get the taste out.

    Annnie

  • 0

    What do they do if the biobag springs a leak or starts growing microbes?? I'm just wondering if they have a way they can rapidly change the bag while keeping the ECMO part hooked up to the umbilical cord!

    ANnie

  • 10

    Hi,

    I would definitely talk to the nurse manager in person on your next shift and show up, don't just call or email. You don't want to burn bridges!

    Good luck

    Annie

  • 1
    Nurse Beth likes this.

    Hi,

    Thank you, I am looking more for information as to whether or not to put those on the resume, and not necessarily the order.

    Annie

  • 0

    Hi all,

    I can't really find a straight answer elsewhere so I figured I would ask on here.

    When you write your cover letter do you add your credentials?

    Would I put: Annie Oakly, BSN, RN, Paramedic

    or just Annie Oakly, RN

    or no credentials?



    What about in the signature line, would I put them there too?



    Thanks for any advice, I am terrible at writing this stuff.


    Annie

  • 0

    Hi,

    If you enjoy it then keep it for as long as you want to. I have had two jobs since I graduated nursing school 10 years ago, and I enjoy each of them in there own way. I mostly like the ambulance, not gonna lie there!

    As long as you remember to have balance and don't work your life away. Free time is far more valuable than working even at a job you like.

    Good luck and enjoy all your new clothes!

    Annie

  • 1
    sevensonnets likes this.

    You need to know all of the typical rhythms that can be seen in patients, otherwise you may not be able to differentiate normal from abnormal, or know which ones to treat.

    Annie

  • 2
    Redhead,RN and MrsJt like this.

    I totally get how you feel, I lasted about 1.5 years as a full time ER nurse before reverting right back to being a full time paramedic again. I don't regret that decision at all, and I am not sure when or if I will do full time nursing again. I don't know that it is worth the stress!


    Annie

  • 1
    Marie9090 likes this.

    Generally speaking, if someone has not had scabies in the past it generally takes about 6 weeks after you become a host for the symptoms to start, as you have to form the antibodies first.

    In other words, I wouldn't be laughing about this, since you and many other staff members were probably exposed before you knew she had them!!! Karma has a way of sneaking up on people...

    Annie

  • 8
    Orca, NurseSpeedy, Here.I.Stand, and 5 others like this.

    You are playing with fire and may get burned, just keep that in mind!

    Annie

  • 5

    Hi,

    I too am a paramedic, and I did EMS long before getting my RN.

    Personally any of my dissatisfaction with nursing has been the lack of autonomy, short staffing, and the needy patients and families that sometimes are just ridiculous with their request and expectations.

    You will not get the whole experience as a CNA because when a family member has a problem or the patient has a problem, you go get the nurse. Everything falls on the nurse's shoulders and for me it added up to the point that I was burnt out of full time ER nursing within a year and part time ER nursing within another year after that, and I went right back to the ambulance full time. I now do nursing per-diem, which makes it for the most part tolerable and it's IV nursing, which in a way is similar to the ambulance. You see the patient for maybe 20 minutes, sometimes longer, and you leave.

    I am at the point where my joints and the rest of my body are not very fond of the ambulance anymore, although I still love it after 19 years. I am trying to obtain a full-time nursing job that is tolerable. I would love to work in pediatrics or NICU, but unfortunately another issue with nursing is it is VERY hard to find a job in those areas, especially in the northeast where I am. So understand that if you go get your RN, a job in the area you want to work in may not be easy to come by.

    A lot of EMS folks who go to nursing tend to veer towards ER nursing. Just know that the frequent flyers, drunks, psychiatric patients, families that can get on your nerves, patients that get on your nerves, bariatric patients, and any other patient we just don't really look forward too will now be yours for hours instead of minutes, and it's a whole different ball game!


close