Latest Comments by AnnieOaklyRN

AnnieOaklyRN, BSN, RN, EMT-P 21,017 Views

Joined Oct 24, '06. AnnieOaklyRN is a RN, Paramedic. She has 'Previously ER RN, 17 years in EMS (yes, I still love it) , IV RN 8 months!' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'IV RN, (911) Paramedic'. Posts: 1,981 (31% Liked) Likes: 2,127

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  • 0

    Quote from caliotter3
    Heh. You are not the only one to encounter this type of situation on the home front. My husband made it clear he didn't think I should pursue an education in general and nursing in particular. He had his reasons, but it didn't help things at home very much.
    So did you? If so good for you for not listening! I feel like some men see it as a threat when a woman becomes no longer financially dependent on them!! I work on the ambulance and see the perils when married couples have children, get divorces, and mom has no education to now support herself!

    I watched my mom experience this and having to depend on men to live comfortably financially and work two jobs, and I didn't want to have the same future!!

    I dated a guy for about a year and we started talking about the future, to include children and he TOLD me that I would be a stay at home mom. I said, that is not what I want to be, he said that didn't matter that is what I would be and he did not want me to work if we had children together. That was my sign to run away, not walk!!!

    Annie

  • 0

    Hi,

    I can understand why you would be frustrated, but have you talked to your actual husband about these feelings? If so, how does he respond?

    Maybe you guys could make a deal on who does what around the house and that you will split chores etc. If that doesn't work try just doing your own laundry and leaving his for him to do, making dinner for only yourself after he works all day, not cleaning the house on your day off, and the list goes on. That sounds childish, but it may be a last ditch effort to help him "get it"!

    I'm not an expert, but to me this is a sign that there are deeper problems with your marriage than just who is doing the chores and helping out. Please seek counseling as both an individual and as a couple, otherwise you may end up part of the 50% statistic!

    This is one reason why I love my simplified single life!!!!!

    Good luck!

    Annie

  • 0

    Hi,

    I am so jealous of you! I am not a new grad, but I have been applying for NICU jobs in the MA and NH areas for a few years now with no luck! Is it the BIDMC new grad NICU position you are interviewing for? Just wondering as I applied for that as well, even though I am not a new grad. Good luck and i hope you get it!

    Annie

  • 0

    Thank you both for the information! Also good luck with your programs, as I am sure you will make great CRNAs!

    Annie

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    Hi all,

    I just have a couple of questions about becoming a CRNA.

    My initial dream job in nursing was NICU, but after 9 years of not being able to get a job in that area I am trying to move on with a new career plan.

    I am wondering about how much CRNA school costs? I know it will be somewhat different for different schools, but a rough estimate. Is it an absolute no work during the time you are in school?

    I have previous ER experience, as well as 13 years of paramedic experience, will that count, or do I need to get some ICU experience? Does it have to be adult ICU or would PICU experience count?

    Thank you!

    Annie

  • 1
    KatieMI likes this.

    There are two sides to every story.... As a paramedic here are some examples why I have little faith on nursing homes!

    1) Called to a nursing home for a "hypoxic" patient with respiratory distress and a history Huntington's Disease. Arrive to find a 40ish year old patient in a diaper only lying in a bed, with no clothes on, and with NO blankets to be found and the air condition on around 60 degrees. (NO I am not exaggerating or making this up). The nursing home nurse relates the patient is "cyanotic, but he won't let me put a nasal cannula on him, as he keeps taking it off." This patient had advanced Huntington's and could no longer walk or talk. My partner and I look at the patent who has NO central cyanosis, but who has blue, cold extremities. Not a single nurse at this facility could figure out that this patient was hypothermic from the environment they set up!!! The patient was not cyanotic and not hypoxic, he had a RR of about 15-20! So we transported this patient so he could actually get some clothes put on him and a blanket, and a warm environment!

    2) Called to a nursing home for a cardiac arrest. Told by the nursing home nurses that "we just saw him ten minutes ago and he was fine". My partner and I get in the room to find a pulseless and apneic elderly patient lying in the bed with FULL RIGOR MORTUS!! You saw him ten minutes ago? really? Again, this is a true story!

    3) Called to another nursing home for a cardiac arrest. Arrive to be told that the staff have been doing CPR for 45 MINUTES! Yes, that is right, 45 minutes! When I asked why they did not call us immediately I was told by the nurse that she was waiting to get a hold of the doctor for an order to transport to the hospital! So, you think this patient is still viable after you have been doing CPR for 45 minutes on the soft mattress???!!

    5) If I got a dollar for every time a nursing home staff member said "I don't usually work this floor, so I don't know". "This is my first day on this floor, so I don't know". "This patient just got here, so I don't know"... the list goes on. This is why we lack respect for nursing home staff, because you do not prove to us that you are knowledgeable and skilled at caring for your patients. I get that you have a large patient load, but the examples above are ALL true experiences that just I have had. So when you pass out medications, you don't note the patient's condition or mental status? Are you just robots essentially?

    When we ask what the patient's baseline mental status is and you say "I don't know", that doesn't help us, because you need to either find out! You are calling for "altered mental status", how do you know if you do not know what their baseline is???? Heck, ask one of the CNAs they deal with them everyday! When your answer to almost every question we ask of you is " I don't know" followed by an excuse, no we won't have respect for you or your staff. When you are asking if you can have your NON-REUSABLE BVM back to reuse (this has happened numerous times), no we won't have respect for you. when we regularly see patient's at the nursing home with respiratory distress on a non-rebreather at 6 LPM, no we won't have respect. (especially when I have specifically told you in the past that you are suffocating the patient and giving them less oxygen than is in the atmosphere)! When it's clear that no critical thinking is happening, no we will not have respect for you.

    Respect is given and earned over time. If we consistently go to your facility and have these experiences, which unfortunately is happening all over the country everyday, we won't respect you. Would you expect a patient to respect me and have faith in my abilities if my answer was "I don't know" to every question I asked of them?


    Do I think any of this warrants rude behavior at the time of the call absolutely not, but understand that the general lack of critical thinking or knowledge we seem to experience in SOME nursing homes/rehabs is very frustrating to EMS staff, who just want to do what is best for the patient.


    Annie

  • 4
    brownbook, xoemmylouox, elkpark, and 1 other like this.

    Work A lot and spend less, that is what I did. Took 18 long years, but I am loan free, and took out zero loans for my RN-BSN! I worked like 80 hours a week though as a medic to do it because it cost 12 grand!

    Annie

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    EMS, I have loved working in EMS for the past 18 years as an EMT and medic.

    Oh, sorry, forgot this is about nursing.... I will get back to you when I actually find a nursing job I love! As of right now nursing has been a total "let down" for lack of a better term. I cannot find a job in the area I am actually passionate about (NICU and pediatrics), so I have no love for nursing.

    Annie

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    Quote from verytallnurse
    Annie,
    Don't you even think about giving up your dream like NICU. Neonatal specialty needs nurses like you, who worked somewhere else but NICU was a true calling. Children hospitals and teaching hospitals hire new grads, therefore will take you with general experience before new grad. Although they wanna save money and cant afford you... You just havent found a right hospital. Before you consider giving up whole specialty, give up your hospital.. If they dont wanna take you into NICU with ER experience, they are fools!!! We just hired 12 new grads for NICU. I wish they had any, any experience anywhere. That makes a difference. So no, you can not give up. We need people like you. On the other hand, are you willing to move for NICU job and where are you now?
    Agne
    Neo Rn (10 y. In NICU)

    Hi there,

    Thank you for the words of encouragement, you are very sweet!!

    I pondered the idea greatly with regards to moving for a job, however I decided with a lot of thought that that is not something I want to do at this point in my life. I have my roots set here and I love where I live, just not the job market. It is very competitive since it seems everyone else wants to live in this area too unfortunately!

    I could not get a NICU job as a new grad because I did not have my BSN at that time. So here I am applying to every NICU job I see with a small glimmer of hope that fades every day...

    I know part of this is my own fault as I got a job in 2010 in a level IIb Special Care Nursery at the hospital where I worked as an ER nurse. The staff were less than welcoming and my preceptor was a true witch, all she needed was a pointy hat and a broom. She seemed to get her kicks being mean to people. I ended up leaving three weeks after I started, which of course I am regretting now, as I never thought it would be this difficult to find another job in a SCN/NICU.

    I will try for as long as I have it in me, then unfortunately I will need to figure out a new career path, as I have no desire to care for adults, for the long term anyway.

    Thank you again everyone.


    Annie

  • 0

    Like the others I am both an RN and a medic; however I have not found a passion for nursing so far, thus I work full time as a medic and only per-diem as a nurse.

    I became a medic first and from my point of view it is VERY hard to go from the autonomy of a medic to a nurse who must rely on physicians for orders. I work in a state where EMS protocols are very generous and we only have to call for Heparin for STEMI, the rest is up to us, unless we feel the need to consult with medical control.

    I got my medic in 2004 after working as an EMT basic for six years and then I went right into nursing school (It was a LONG 4 years of school to get both, because it was two associate degrees), anywho I worked for a year or so full time as an ER nurse and after taking a week off I realized how stressed and drained I felt doing nursing versus EMS. I reverted back to full time EMS and it was the best decision I made. I do two 24 hour shifts and work in a 911 only system where the FD are more than happy to do the lifting, which I am grateful for (18 years of EMS can do a number on your back and joints). I make more than I would make as a nurse believe it or not, because I have 8 hours of OT built into every week. I work two days a week and because my job is so low stress I generally can do 1 or 2 12 hour shifts a week as overtime! Eventually i will need to return to full time nursing because I am 39 now and I have been doing EMS since I was 20, thus my body will probably not tolerate it into my 50s I would assume. I want to do NICU or pediatric nursing and have not been able to find a job, as the market in this area is tough. Until I get a NICU/ peds job I will continue in EMS and I am quite thankful I am not stuck in a nursing job I hate waiting for the one I want to come along!!

    Good luck! Always follow your heart. People told me I would regret going back to EMS because of the pay and blah blah. Turns out I knew what was right for my mental health and again I am making more money, especially since I can actually tolerate doing OT in EMS. The bottom line is you have to do what you feel is right for you, no one else can tell you. Also it is a very good idea to have two skill sets so you have a back up plan!

    Annie

  • 0
    In SVT

    Hi,

    Maybe he had a reflexive vagal response? I am not totally sure, but I also wonder if something else is going on with the kiddo like a congenital heart defect that hasn't been found yet!

    If you guys do not have a PICU did you send him out to a facility that does, and one that can rule out other issues?

    Annie

  • 1
    poppycat likes this.

    If you contact the user Boraz on here he or she had one that they were sending to people. There may actually even be a link somewhere in one of the threads, so I would look at the last 3-4 pages of them to see. I think it was labeled "NICU BRAIN".


    Annie

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    I just turned 39 last week and graduated with my RN-BSN last January at the age of 38. I obtained my associates degree in nursing when I was 29 and my associates in paramedicine when I was 26!

    Annie

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    Hi,

    She does always respond to my emails and either lets me know she will keep me in mind or that she wants someone with experience. She has never ignored my emails, as she is a very polite person.

    Annie

  • 0

    Thank you for the input!!

    Annie


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