Latest Comments by AnnieOaklyRN

AnnieOaklyRN, BSN, RN, EMT-P 21,376 Views

Joined Oct 24, '06. AnnieOaklyRN is a RN, Paramedic. She has 'Previously ER RN, 17 years in EMS (yes, I still love it) , IV RN 8 months!' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'IV RN, (911) Paramedic'. Posts: 1,992 (32% Liked) Likes: 2,189

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  • 4
    OrganizedChaos, cyc0sys, Meriwhen, and 1 other like this.

    It isn't about what happens during CPR it's what happens after, which can include permanent disability and brain damage (permeant vegetative state), huge medical bills with a person that is still dead. I would focus more on the big picture versus the right now. CPR isn't gonna effect the dead body, but when we bring them back with only their brain stem surviving or worse a small part of their cerebral cortex, that's where people may get that its not something they want to endure!

    Unfortunately society sees what is on tv and that is usually a code, CPR, a shock and like a miracle they all wake up and are fine! You need to emphasize that most patents who go into cardiac arrest stay that way and another percentage will have permanent brain damage that can leave them bed ridden etc. Advise them that only 8% of out of hospital cardiac arrests survive to discharge, that is a very small number and it's up to the patient and family if they want to roll the dice!

    Encourage patients to speak up and voice what THEY want if they are cognitively able and advise the family to make sure there are no advance directives if the patient can no longer make that decision. I think families have a false idea that everyone gets a shock and wakes up and life goes on.

    p.s. let them know not everyone is in a shockable rhythm either!

    Annie

  • 1
    Eeramsey likes this.

    You must be a millennial if you are even asking this question!!

    YES, work full time while you obtain your RN to BSN! You will not melt and I assure you, you will survive it!

    Sincerely,

    Someone who has worked full time since the age of 18, even through two full time degrees and my RN to BSN!

  • 4
    chacha82, amzyRN, SmilingBluEyes, and 1 other like this.

    Hi,

    I worked with a nurse in a very small ER (8 beds) at a critical access hospital, and had not a clue, none of us did, that she was abusing narcotics. We did always wondered why she was wearing long sleeves even in warmer months, but to us there were no other warning signs. Then the day came when we responded in the ambulance to her in cardiac arrest from an overdose (I worked for the hospital based ambulance), that was a truly awful day. She was young, married, and had children that needed her!

    Some of the nurses even hung out with her outside of work and still no one thought anything was wrong, until it was to late. I am not sure how close you are to this nurse, but if you are a close friend please have a heart to heart with her and make sure she is ok and not truly addicted, if she is encourage her to get some help before it's to late.

    Annie

  • 2
    BSNbeDONE and saskrn like this.

    I second what the commuter said, not everyone wants to be social or is natural at it.

    I for one have a few close friends, but not a ton, as I don't want that many. I have no desire to go out and socialize, especially in crowded settings like parties etc. I'm not depressed, that's just my personality, and it may be the same for the OP.

    OP maybe join some nursing associations in your area or go to a conference or two so you can network?


    Annie

  • 2

    I am very sorry you are going through this. This new manager seems to have forgotten her employees are also people! As soon as management forgets that we are human with needs outside of work the morale goes down and the revolving door gets installed! Some people should not be managers, end of story, but you cannot tell them that.

    I went through this in an ER where I worked, and it was awful. The ER had great potential to be awesome, but the manager treated people like they had no life outside of work and everything was the nurses fault, it wasn't the poor staffing or poor work flow... :/ Unfortunately poor nurse managers ruin units!

    Annie

  • 0

    Hi,

    I live in the northeast and am wondering if you will be graduating with a BSN? It is a really tough job market in MA as far as jobs go, especially with new grads. I have heard that UMASS Worcester does hire new grads, but I am not sure how often and I believe you need a BSN.

    Good luck,

    Annie

  • 10
    h00tyh00t, DWelly14, RNinIN, and 7 others like this.

    Quote from roser13
    A while back there were a couple of posters on here making a case for GFM accounts to pay for their nursing school. You see, they didn't want to work AND go to school.

    Those poor babies , I worked full time while going to school for all of my degrees, if only I had known I could have just leached off other people!

    Annie

  • 0

    It depends on the hospital. Where I work I am part of the IV team and we do the central line dressings, even in ICU.

    Annie

  • 3
    poppycat, brandy1017, and elkpark like this.

    Quote from Lannister123
    Yes, I have good grades in them too. I applied to Physical therapy assistant school and nursing school and didnt get in. Im basically looking for plan B. Plus i already have 60 credit in an associate degree and getting a bachelors makes sense.

    It only makes sense if it will provide you with a career, otherwise you are wasting lots of money which you won't appreciate when you have to pay it back!!

    Annie

  • 3

    Hi,

    I agree with everyone in that this was a very well written post. I can also feel your pain and the satisfaction of leaving nursing!!

    I too was in the same boat after working as an ER RN for only about a year full time, followed by another year part time. I went to an EMS conference and it was the first vacation I had been on in a while. I realized how much better I felt, no stress, just like the weight of the world had been lifted off my shoulders.

    As many ER nurses know, the rate of burn out is increasing ten fold in the ER because of the share volume of patients and psychiatric patients. They are emotionally draining and as you said the nurse becomes the emotional punching bags of all families and patients. This spills over to all areas of nursing, especially now with short staffing and increasing numbers of belligerent people.

    Anywho, I feel blessed that I can fall back on my beloved EMS career which is FAR less stressful and actually fun. I enjoy going to work come to think of it! I make plenty of money to pay the bills and work two set 24 hour shifts, and I can sleep if we are not busy. I do 911 only which is even better, as I do not like transfer work. I am glad for you that you have found your escape route and sincerely hope you are happier and much less stressed!

    "To love what you do, is to never work a day in your life" - I forgot the author, but these are words to live by in your career life.

    Annie

  • 2
    Jessy_RN and KindaBack like this.

    Be careful, someone used a flashlight on an ambulance in my area and the infant ended up with second degree burns because there was no way for the heat to escape!! I would stick with a transiluminator!!

    Medical équipement is expensive because it has to go through both expensive and rigorous testing per the FDA, someone has to pay for that!



    Annie

  • 16

    Quote from caliotter3
    Heh. You are not the only one to encounter this type of situation on the home front. My husband made it clear he didn't think I should pursue an education in general and nursing in particular. He had his reasons, but it didn't help things at home very much.
    So did you? If so good for you for not listening! I feel like some men see it as a threat when a woman becomes no longer financially dependent on them!! I work on the ambulance and see the perils when married couples have children, get divorces, and mom has no education to now support herself!

    I watched my mom experience this and having to depend on men to live comfortably financially and work two jobs, and I didn't want to have the same future!!

    I dated a guy for about a year and we started talking about the future, to include children and he TOLD me that I would be a stay at home mom. I said, that is not what I want to be, he said that didn't matter that is what I would be and he did not want me to work if we had children together. That was my sign to run away, not walk!!!

    Annie

  • 13
    kalycat, vintagemother, poppycat, and 10 others like this.

    Hi,

    I can understand why you would be frustrated, but have you talked to your actual husband about these feelings? If so, how does he respond?

    Maybe you guys could make a deal on who does what around the house and that you will split chores etc. If that doesn't work try just doing your own laundry and leaving his for him to do, making dinner for only yourself after he works all day, not cleaning the house on your day off, and the list goes on. That sounds childish, but it may be a last ditch effort to help him "get it"!

    I'm not an expert, but to me this is a sign that there are deeper problems with your marriage than just who is doing the chores and helping out. Please seek counseling as both an individual and as a couple, otherwise you may end up part of the 50% statistic!

    This is one reason why I love my simplified single life!!!!!

    Good luck!

    Annie

  • 0

    Hi,

    I am so jealous of you! I am not a new grad, but I have been applying for NICU jobs in the MA and NH areas for a few years now with no luck! Is it the BIDMC new grad NICU position you are interviewing for? Just wondering as I applied for that as well, even though I am not a new grad. Good luck and i hope you get it!

    Annie

  • 0

    Thank you both for the information! Also good luck with your programs, as I am sure you will make great CRNAs!

    Annie


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