Latest Likes For mclennan

Latest Likes For mclennan

mclennan, BSN 16,272 Views

Joined Sep 25, '06. Posts: 747 (58% Liked) Likes: 2,216

Sorted By Last Like Received (Max 500)
  • Aug 12

    Any time you sign your name you automatically put "RN" & the date/time after it, especially when tired after a long shift, I did this at the DMV and had to do it over.

    Here in L.A., my co workers and I used to try and guess which SSRI/NRI/benzo the plastic-surgeried ladies we saw on the street were on, "she totally has Zoloft face. OMG, that blonde one has Xanax eyes. Lookit, Paxil face AND fresh Botox!"

    Carry box of gloves in car in case of Good Samaritan situation. And I sometimes try to log on my computer at home with my work logon.

  • Aug 1

    Powerlessness. Some is perpetuated by the systematic forces, and unfortunately, some is perpetuated by nurses themselves.

  • Jul 18

    Any time you sign your name you automatically put "RN" & the date/time after it, especially when tired after a long shift, I did this at the DMV and had to do it over.

    Here in L.A., my co workers and I used to try and guess which SSRI/NRI/benzo the plastic-surgeried ladies we saw on the street were on, "she totally has Zoloft face. OMG, that blonde one has Xanax eyes. Lookit, Paxil face AND fresh Botox!"

    Carry box of gloves in car in case of Good Samaritan situation. And I sometimes try to log on my computer at home with my work logon.

  • Jul 10

    I think every nurse aged 55+ who has had this happen should all get together somehow and write a letter/synopsis/report about their collective experiences. Publish it professionally, and send it to unions, professional nursing organizations, nursing media, the AARP and prominent nursing leaders asking them to address this issue!!

    It is happening far more than what's reported. I understand the generational shift that's affecting all professions generally. I understand the complications this presents to management. What I don't understand is the total and utter lack of training, preparedness or mechanisms in place to deal with the widening age gap in the workforce. I have seen managers, time and time again, prioritize the bottom line over the value of experienced nurses. Rather than develop constructive ways to utilize their knowledge - or learn new techniques to effectively handle the conflicts between older and younger employees, they'd rather just fire them, or worse, passive/aggressively pressure them out by making the work environment so uninhabitable they have no choice but to quit. It's not just happening in nursing. It's happening everywhere.

    That being said.....oldsters, my advice to you is to keep up with the changing technology, be tech-savvy, and don't be a high maintenance chestnut. Just do stuff the new way they want you to, stop clinging to paper and old protocols. Don't eat your young, and don't perpetuate the old stereotypes. Don't give those managers any excuse to start honing in on you. Every time I've seen an older nurse get canned it almost ALWAYS starts because of these issues. I hate to see it go down that way, but I find a lot of older nurses are so stubborn about learning new things, they practically invite the scrutiny that starts the process of termination. So stay flexible, stay informed, learn that software without complaint and nurture those youngins! You are our ROLE MODELS!

  • Jul 1

    You sound desperate, insecure, competitive and way too worried about what other people think about how you're "supposed" to be.

    As a smart, interesting and attractive woman, I can tell you right now that those characteristics are MAJOR turn-offs. Like will attract like, and unless you get over this sense of anxiety about what you're "supposed" to be doing, you'll only attract women who are similarly desperate, insecure, competitive and vain. And you'll fail at relationship after relationship or have zero luck at all.

    I suggest you re-frame the way you look at women altogether. Physical attraction is great, sure, but if you are only basing your interest in women on that to start with, that's part of your problem. A BIG PART. Women are much more about their looks. I would hope you'd find their mind, thoughts, sense of humor, compassion, value systems, and goals in life MUCH more interesting than whether or not they are "okay looking." You sound dreadfully old-fashioned and shallow. Sorry to be harsh but sometimes it is necessary.

    Smart, funny, driven women like a man with quiet confidence, who isn't worried about what others think of their status in life, who takes care of himself and is well loved by others.

  • Jun 18

    Reminds me of when I volunteered at an AIDS hospice (well it was a group home, but in the 90s we didn't call it a hospice even though that's what it was) and cared for this wonderful man. He was 6'4 and near the end, he wasted away to only 100lbs. or so. He spent a lot of hours sitting in a deep bathtub of warm water, nothing else was very comfortable for him. One night I asked him if he'd like anything to eat or drink and out of the blue he said, "you know what I'm craving? A big, day-glow fruity island cocktail. In a big glass, with the little umbrella and garnishes and a straw. Ice cold. I miss sipping drinks like that on vacation."

    Well, of course there were several men in recovery at this place and alcohol was banned. At first I thought, I'll figure out how to make a virgin drink like that for him. I called my uncle who was an ex-bartender in his 60s. I'll never forget it. He said "to heck with that. Let's make this man a proper drink." I stopped by his house the next day and there he had a whole setup, a Thermos with the drink in it, and a hurricane glass packed with fruit, umbrella and straw. He even wrapped it all up in a box so I could smuggle it in.

    I did. I arrived & found my patient in his bath, candles lit & music playing as usual. Got a huge container of ice from the machine, and locked the door behind us. I took out the glass, iced it and poured the drink. It was a hideous bright blue and loaded with rum. I fixed up the garnishes and umbrella and gave it to him. I have NEVER seen such a blessed out look on a human being's face!

    After only 5 or 10 minutes I could see the blue drink coming out of him in the bath water. His GI was so destroyed that almost anything he consumed was passed so quickly he couldn't absorb it. I didn't say anything. I let him enjoy the cocktail. He finished about half, then handed it to me and said "you finish it. I insist." (I was not a nurse then and an off-duty volunteer). I pulled up a chair next to the tub and settled in. We sat there a long time, talking about our favorite vacations and wild times. I very stealthily changed the bathwater until it was clear again.

    He died about a month later. At the visitation I tucked the little cocktail umbrella in his suit pocket and kissed him goodbye.
    ichanges

  • Jun 14

    You sound desperate, insecure, competitive and way too worried about what other people think about how you're "supposed" to be.

    As a smart, interesting and attractive woman, I can tell you right now that those characteristics are MAJOR turn-offs. Like will attract like, and unless you get over this sense of anxiety about what you're "supposed" to be doing, you'll only attract women who are similarly desperate, insecure, competitive and vain. And you'll fail at relationship after relationship or have zero luck at all.

    I suggest you re-frame the way you look at women altogether. Physical attraction is great, sure, but if you are only basing your interest in women on that to start with, that's part of your problem. A BIG PART. Women are much more about their looks. I would hope you'd find their mind, thoughts, sense of humor, compassion, value systems, and goals in life MUCH more interesting than whether or not they are "okay looking." You sound dreadfully old-fashioned and shallow. Sorry to be harsh but sometimes it is necessary.

    Smart, funny, driven women like a man with quiet confidence, who isn't worried about what others think of their status in life, who takes care of himself and is well loved by others.

  • May 27

    I am a case manager RN. I also have a good relationship with my hiring manager and know why she hired me so here ya go:

    1. BSN. Most medical groups, insurance co.s, hospitals get better reimbursement and accreditation if CMs have BSN.

    2. Some experience in Public Health, health teaching, discharge planning, chronic condition management or something along those lines. Lots of states offer PHN licensure to BSNs whose program curriculum included community/public health that meets requirements. If you can get it, get it. My hiring manager, and 3 or 4 other CMs in my department were PHNs for some years before becoming CMs - she says that pretty much nailed why they hired me. Highlight any nursing experience in which you developed therapeutic, long term relationships with patients and followed them through chronic illness. Any telephone triage expertise or training is valuable too.

    3. Get certified as a CM either by the Commission for Case Manager Certification or the ANCC Case Manager Board Certification. I cannot emphasize this enough.

    4. Be prepared to sit in a cubicle all day calling patients, to wear business clothes, to earn salary instead of hourly, and go to lots of meetings. It is a far cry from working the floor, the clinic, or 12 hours in scrubs. And it's not always better, it can be just as crazy busy, complicated, stressful and the grind of 9-5, M-F isn't the paradise you might think. We have had a couple of CMs who came straight from inpatient, bedside shift work nursing leave after 5 or 6 months because they missed working with patients and having those 3 or 4 days off a week. And, they missed overtime pay.

    5. On the upside, it's very autonomous, independent work that actually uses nursing theory heavily, and really sharpens your critical thinking skills. Docs love us. Patients love that they don't have to come to as many appointments and have a go-to advocate. Case management is gonna be a big thing, it saves everyone money and increases patient satisfaction scores big time. And, the pay is great IF you have the experience and certification!

    Hope that helps and good luck!

  • May 12

    House Call Doctor : Why Is My Doctor Always Late? :: Quick and Dirty Tips ™

    If dummy Dr. Tardy took a pay cut to hire a good CM RN he'd be on time, have better patient outcomes and recoup the cost with better audits and reimbursement!!!!! DUH!!!

  • Apr 19

    Powerlessness. Some is perpetuated by the systematic forces, and unfortunately, some is perpetuated by nurses themselves.

  • Apr 14

    I am a case manager RN. I also have a good relationship with my hiring manager and know why she hired me so here ya go:

    1. BSN. Most medical groups, insurance co.s, hospitals get better reimbursement and accreditation if CMs have BSN.

    2. Some experience in Public Health, health teaching, discharge planning, chronic condition management or something along those lines. Lots of states offer PHN licensure to BSNs whose program curriculum included community/public health that meets requirements. If you can get it, get it. My hiring manager, and 3 or 4 other CMs in my department were PHNs for some years before becoming CMs - she says that pretty much nailed why they hired me. Highlight any nursing experience in which you developed therapeutic, long term relationships with patients and followed them through chronic illness. Any telephone triage expertise or training is valuable too.

    3. Get certified as a CM either by the Commission for Case Manager Certification or the ANCC Case Manager Board Certification. I cannot emphasize this enough.

    4. Be prepared to sit in a cubicle all day calling patients, to wear business clothes, to earn salary instead of hourly, and go to lots of meetings. It is a far cry from working the floor, the clinic, or 12 hours in scrubs. And it's not always better, it can be just as crazy busy, complicated, stressful and the grind of 9-5, M-F isn't the paradise you might think. We have had a couple of CMs who came straight from inpatient, bedside shift work nursing leave after 5 or 6 months because they missed working with patients and having those 3 or 4 days off a week. And, they missed overtime pay.

    5. On the upside, it's very autonomous, independent work that actually uses nursing theory heavily, and really sharpens your critical thinking skills. Docs love us. Patients love that they don't have to come to as many appointments and have a go-to advocate. Case management is gonna be a big thing, it saves everyone money and increases patient satisfaction scores big time. And, the pay is great IF you have the experience and certification!

    Hope that helps and good luck!

  • Apr 4

    Reminds me of when I volunteered at an AIDS hospice (well it was a group home, but in the 90s we didn't call it a hospice even though that's what it was) and cared for this wonderful man. He was 6'4 and near the end, he wasted away to only 100lbs. or so. He spent a lot of hours sitting in a deep bathtub of warm water, nothing else was very comfortable for him. One night I asked him if he'd like anything to eat or drink and out of the blue he said, "you know what I'm craving? A big, day-glow fruity island cocktail. In a big glass, with the little umbrella and garnishes and a straw. Ice cold. I miss sipping drinks like that on vacation."

    Well, of course there were several men in recovery at this place and alcohol was banned. At first I thought, I'll figure out how to make a virgin drink like that for him. I called my uncle who was an ex-bartender in his 60s. I'll never forget it. He said "to heck with that. Let's make this man a proper drink." I stopped by his house the next day and there he had a whole setup, a Thermos with the drink in it, and a hurricane glass packed with fruit, umbrella and straw. He even wrapped it all up in a box so I could smuggle it in.

    I did. I arrived & found my patient in his bath, candles lit & music playing as usual. Got a huge container of ice from the machine, and locked the door behind us. I took out the glass, iced it and poured the drink. It was a hideous bright blue and loaded with rum. I fixed up the garnishes and umbrella and gave it to him. I have NEVER seen such a blessed out look on a human being's face!

    After only 5 or 10 minutes I could see the blue drink coming out of him in the bath water. His GI was so destroyed that almost anything he consumed was passed so quickly he couldn't absorb it. I didn't say anything. I let him enjoy the cocktail. He finished about half, then handed it to me and said "you finish it. I insist." (I was not a nurse then and an off-duty volunteer). I pulled up a chair next to the tub and settled in. We sat there a long time, talking about our favorite vacations and wild times. I very stealthily changed the bathwater until it was clear again.

    He died about a month later. At the visitation I tucked the little cocktail umbrella in his suit pocket and kissed him goodbye.
    ichanges

  • Mar 31

    I can assure you with 10000% accuracy and truth that I am a full time MSN student at WGU. The two classes I've completed both required posting to a message board as part of the class content: reflective exercises and critical thinking commentaries. My mentor has told me she and other faculty check these boards, and our participation is a small part of the overall grades. Many components of the course state: "share you thoughts on the message board & respond to at least one other student's posting." This is not the "community" boards I'm talking about. SMT2 and NFT2 both required this, in addition to the Tasksteam assessments. Which weren't hard either. And for the record, I've never even been on their Facebook page, because I don't do Facebook - period.

    The course message boards are chock full of people who ramble on and on about their military service, sparkling work history, children and struggles, often more so than the course topic at hand. It gets pretty tiresome.

    Overall it's a good deal for the price. I'm doing it to get the piece of paper I need to get the heck away from bedside, for the cheapest price. I am sorry so many of you can't swallow the truth: most college education, anywhere, in any form, are exercises in BS, requiring little critical thought, intellect or real pedagogy these days to pass. They want your money, you want the degree, they make their process almost impossible for that NOT to happen. Regurgitate the words they wanna hear in your little papers, use APA correctly and you'll get your Pass grade. Same thing at any school. College has been and is, pretty much a joke in this country for decades - with the rare exception here and there. Come on folks......you can't be that naive. It's all pretty meaningless hoop-jumping.

    My own enrollment specialist is Mormon, and he himself told me over half the staff at HQ are Mormon. They're physically located in Salt Lake City, for crying out loud! That's not ignorance. That's the truth and I think it's great! You don't believe me? Ask them yourselves. If you have a problem with that, it is YOU who is ignorant, not me.

    Funny how many get their knickers in a twist because someone thinks differently than they do. Fine nurses you must make!

  • Mar 31

    Um...yeah....definitely attending WGU MSN program. Sorry it's easier for some and harder for others. I am not busting my ass or being challenged at all. Everyone is different, but seriously, if you are struggling through a program this simple, I am sorry. It requires very, VERY basic research and writing skills that any of us should have learned in high school and nursing school - and that's about it. Get real. It's not that hard.

  • Mar 22

    I'm not being rude, I'm being realistic.

    I am addressing both you and NurseVirgo. (And I repeat, my PM box is NOT full). I gave a lot of info in my response to help both of you and you still post questions that sound like you're very inexperienced at this.

    There's nothing wrong with inexperience, but anyone - especially a traveling nurse, this day and age - should know how to use Craigslist and Google Maps. And should know what anyone means by the term "non-diverse."

    I basically spelled out, step by step, how to start looking for a decent place on CL (a room rental in an upscale home in the Valley) and you STILL asked for more info about it. Come on. Ask more specific questions, not just a request for "more info."

    I was more supportive and gave more info than anyone else did in response to your questions. Sorry I expect a traveling nurse (from whatever period of time) to know some BASICS. Come on guys, get with the program, everyone uses Craigslist and Google Maps, you shouldn't need to be instructed how. I'm happy to address Los Angeles-specific issues but I'm a little surprised you both act like you need such obvious things explained.


close
close