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XB9S Guide 43,085 Views

Joined Sep 7, '06 - from 'United Kingdom'. XB9S is a Registered nurse. She has '22' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Advanced Practice, surgery'. Posts: 8,602 (25% Liked) Likes: 3,892

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  • Jun 15

    1. Plan

    Before you start, have an good idea about what your going to aim to write about and discuss this with your tutor. Quite often good ideas can be swamped by the shear volume of information available which leads to a potentially excellent subject only being discussed at a superficial level. Your tutor will be able to guide and support you in focusing your idea so that your able to get the depth required for the level you are studying.

    Meet with your tutor early on, and then ask for appointments to be set at that point to give you goals to aim for when you are writing. There are a few people who can manage without tutor guidance but the majority will need at least one meeting to make sure your on the right track.

    Plan your work, think of the structure of your essay and work to that structure, I will go into this in a bit more detail now.

    2. Structure

    Think of when you read a journal article, and how that is set out. There are some aspects of writing that need to be there to help the flow of your work.

    Introduction: This is your opportunity to tell the reader what your writing about and how you are going to structure your work. It give clear direction of what to expect and helps the work flow better and easier to read.

    For Example:

    Working as a ANP in this speciality there is particular interest in this subject.
    A description of the interest and current challenges / focus / conflict
    This work will begin with a ..... (eg: review of the literature which will be examined in detail, )
    it will then focus on
    Following this a discussion will take place around
    Conclusions will be drawn and recommendations made.


    Main Body: Stick to what you have set out in your introduction structure, it helps the flow and this is expected in academic writing. If you have done a literature review it is good to give a brief summary of how you obtained the literature so describe your search strategy.

    E.G. A literature search was carried out using the following search engines and databases. Date parameters were set to 2001 - current day and the following search terms were inputed. From this 3000 articles were obtained requiring filters to be applied to date / location / speciality etc etc

    You can also comment on the types of articles you have found so if they are primary research, lit reviews, descriptive or historical articles. This indicates if there is a good evidence base or if there is need for further primary research.

    When you are discussing the articles it is not enough just to mention the author and date with a comment, in academic writing you must provide evidence that you have actually critically analysed the information you have presented so for research papers, what methodology did they use was it appropriate, what was the sample and does this give any limitations. Have the authors commented on limitations and if so how does this alter application to practice and your work. Similarly for literature reviews, have they described the search strategy is it comprehensive and there any areas that would have been missed and affect the quality of the review.

    If you are not familiar with critical appraisal then use a tool to help you get started. CASP provide some excellent resources for looking at the quality of research. There are other tools out there but I quite like these as they are good for starting off and simple to use

    http://www.sph.nhs.uk/what-we-do/pub...ills-programme

    Also Tricia Greenhalph wrote several articles for the BMJ on How to read papers, they are also excellent resources.

    http://www.bmj.com/content/315/7109/672.extract

    Also think about the quality of evidence, if needed look at the levels of evidence and make comment about it

    http://medicalevidence.org.uk/page_1255888996501.html

    If you do not critically analyse the literature you discuss then you will not meet the basic criteria for marking at degree and masters level.

    Conclusions: There should be no new information, and your conclusions have to be relevant to the subject you are discussing. There is no point in discussing pressure sore prevalence and introducing skin bundles at ward level and then concluding that advanced nursing practice has a role in improving skin integrity in cancer patients. I know that sounds common sense but you'd be surprised what gets presented in assignments.

    References: Use the system requested by your educational provider, and these are easy marks so take time and make sure you reference properly. It's attention to detail and important that you get it right.

    3. Basic Presentation

    Your educational provider should give you an assessment grid, this will give you clear ideas about what level they expect you to achieve. Read them, and if you don't understand them ask your tutor to explain. They are written in jargon sometimes but if it states that to pass you must "identify significant features of issues and make appropriate use of methods / techniques for analysis considering incomplete and contradictory areas of knowledge" they mean you need to critically analyse the literature your presenting and discuss limitations in application to practice.

    Proof read your work, spelling mistakes, grammatical errors and basic punctuation will detract from your content and lose you marks. If you have difficulty with spelling and grammar (I know that I certainly do) then ask someone else to proof read it for you. Not necessarily your tutor, I don't correct this type of mistakes for my students but then they are masters level so I expect them to have already done so and it doesn't need to be someone who understands the subject either, just to pick up basic errors.

  • Apr 18

    One of the questions I am most frequently asked is how do I prepare for an interview, and over the years of both being interviewed and interviewing I have built up a stock pile of questions and interview tips. There are many websites out there that can help you prepare, and I have included some of them as links here.

    One of the easiest questions to prepare for is "tell us about yourself" it's a way of breaking the ice at interviews and you will usually get some sort of variation of this question. What are they looking for with this question? I like to see a good mix of professional information with outside interests. One suggestion would be to start with your professional career, with your hopes and goals for the future and then add a little of your other interests as well. One of the most interesting interviews I held was with a young lady who had traveled to Africa volunteering with a health organization. It was a great talking point of the interview and put her at ease before we started asking the more challenging questions.

    Other fairly routine questions would be about your good points and bad points, why you want the job, what differences you think you could make.

    Basic Interview Good Practice

    First impressions are vital, especially if the interview panel are spending a day interviewing applicants. You want to be able to stick in their minds as a professional and capable nurse. Make sure you are well dressed, if you wear a suit it gives a good impression, you've made the effort and want to impress. If you don't have a suit then smart clothes are vital.

    Unless you have absolutely no other option don't go to the interview wearing your uniform, if you have to work then take smart clothes with you to work and change although I do appreciate this isn't always possible.

    Preparation for the interview is very important, make sure you read the job description and know what the job is all about, if you can arrange an informal visit so you can meet the manager and staff, this shows that you are keen and gives you the chance to see where you may potentially be working. It also gives the manager / interviewer a chance to meet you and that way when they come to interview you, they will already know who you are and therefore you will be a little more memorable.

    Try to prepare information that is relevent to the job you are going for. If it is a specialist role then research the current trends, and government targets / guidelines for that role.

    The NHS jobsite has some excellent advice about interview prep

    Some interview 'do's' for nurses and healthcare job seekers:


    • Research the healthcare organization/hospital before you go, and think about why you would like to work there. A prospective employer will take into account the amount of effort that candidates have taken to prepare and research the company prior to attending the interview.
    • Take any documentation with you that your prospective employer may want to see e.g. NMC Registration, Identification, Certificates, Hep B immune status.
    • First impressions count! You should wear smart, clean and appropriate clothing.
    • Make sure your mobile phone is switched off as soon as you enter the building.
    • Prepare answers to common nursing/healthcare interview questions
    • Plan your route in advance, allow plenty of time to deal with delays or traffic jams and take down contact details of your interviewer in case of emergencies.
    • Review your CV or application form. Know it inside out and take a spare copy to brief yourself before the interview. This can be used as a replacement should your interviewer not have one.
    • Make sure you have a good understanding of topical subjects e.g. The Patient's Charter.
    • Maintain good eye contact with the interviewer, speak clearly during conversations
    • Always let the interviewer finish speaking before giving your response.
    • Be enthusiastic and smile. Use positive body language.
    • Think about some questions you can ask at the end of the interview. Relevant ones will demonstrate that you are a serious contender for the role.
    • At the end of the interview, shake the interviewers hand firmly and thank them for giving you the opportunity to attend the interview. Always ask for feedback.


    There is also a link within that advice that is useful for preparing a CV, although more and more NHS jobs are now online applications and CV's are not requested.

  • Mar 30

    As Denmark is an EU member state you should be able to transfer your registration across. We've just appointed nurses from other EU countries who are newly qualified in my hospital in the UK

    It's worth contacting an agency to assist with this.

  • Mar 29

    As Denmark is an EU member state you should be able to transfer your registration across. We've just appointed nurses from other EU countries who are newly qualified in my hospital in the UK

    It's worth contacting an agency to assist with this.

  • Mar 23

    As Denmark is an EU member state you should be able to transfer your registration across. We've just appointed nurses from other EU countries who are newly qualified in my hospital in the UK

    It's worth contacting an agency to assist with this.

  • Feb 21

    Quote from MunoRN
    C diff that results from being on antibiotics isn't actually something you catch from staff or other patients, it's usually that you already had C diff bacteria in your GI tract which is held in check be the rest of your normal GI flora (bacteria), then when you take an antibiotic that kills everything but the C. Diff bacteria, the C Diff is now unopposed and flourishes.

    You seem to be describing a failure of staff to wash rather than gel when coming into the room which is actually necessary when coming into the room of a C diff patient, only going out of the room.
    I'm sorry but I'll have to respectfully disagree with you here.

    C diff can be transmitted by touching contaminated surfaces as a result of poor hand hygiene techniques. That's why it's classed as an infectious disease.

    Although it may not pose a problem in healthy individuals it is a risk to those who are unwell, frail etc. Cross infection is a real risk which is why hand hygiene and barrier precautions as so important.

    Antibiotics interfere with the normal gut flora which allow the spores to flourish.

    I've added some information sheets for you to read

    Clostridium difficile - NHS Choices

    Fact Sheet – Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) - Public Health Agency of Canada

    The World Health Organisation 5 moments describe before during and after contact hand hygiene to prevent cross infection.

    WHO | About SAVE LIVES: Clean Your Hands

    It's good practice to clean your hands when you enter a patient space.

  • Feb 9

    Thank you for sharing this with us. I am in awe of the job you do, working with such tiny people knowing that there will at some stage be a devistating and heartbreaking loss, you do it with such compassion and professionalism it is a testament to the wonderful nurse you are.

  • Jan 14

    I don't have time to flirt, I usually don't have time to pee. If any of the staff who work on my unit have time to flirt I can always find a patient that needs feeding, talking to, bed making or even a storeroom that needs cleaning.

  • Jan 2

    Quote from Trini_malenurse
    Hi all, I am a Registered Mental Nurse in Trinidad. I have currently started the process to get on the NMC register with my CBT exam sitting this January. Once successful and migrated to the UK, I would like to go back to school and pursue my general nursing studies so I can be on Part 1 of their register. Does anyone knows of any school that allows a condense version of training taking into account my previous three years of training in a Psych Specialty?
    I think you'll have to do the full 3 years course, conversion courses aren't really provided any more.

  • Dec 26 '15

    Quote from vandiola
    When I did my ITU placement I don't think I ever saw a nurse use a stethoscope, except the PERTT nurses. I assume it does vary across hospitals, I've worked in some district hospitals where nurses aren't allowed to do any cannulations or ECGs.
    Every ITU I've worked in it was standard practice to assess your patients at the start and during your shift which included auscultation.

  • Nov 13 '15

    OK guys, I think this thread is just about done now.

    Closed

  • Nov 13 '15

    Quote from Jooles
    Hello, I have just been invited to interview for a return to nursing course Adult Nursing-Band 5. It includes two written papers: Patient Care Scenarios and Drug Calculations. I have been searching online for examples of what I need to brush up on with little success. As I left practice in 1991 I am very apprehensive about this interview and would like to be as prepared as I can be. Do you have any information on where I could find some practice papers or some guidelines on what might be asked? Thank you in advance.
    Here you go

    http://www.testandcalc.com

    https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&so...8dXdG-7TwvORag

  • Oct 17 '15

    Quote from MunoRN
    C diff that results from being on antibiotics isn't actually something you catch from staff or other patients, it's usually that you already had C diff bacteria in your GI tract which is held in check be the rest of your normal GI flora (bacteria), then when you take an antibiotic that kills everything but the C. Diff bacteria, the C Diff is now unopposed and flourishes.

    You seem to be describing a failure of staff to wash rather than gel when coming into the room which is actually necessary when coming into the room of a C diff patient, only going out of the room.
    I'm sorry but I'll have to respectfully disagree with you here.

    C diff can be transmitted by touching contaminated surfaces as a result of poor hand hygiene techniques. That's why it's classed as an infectious disease.

    Although it may not pose a problem in healthy individuals it is a risk to those who are unwell, frail etc. Cross infection is a real risk which is why hand hygiene and barrier precautions as so important.

    Antibiotics interfere with the normal gut flora which allow the spores to flourish.

    I've added some information sheets for you to read

    Clostridium difficile - NHS Choices

    Fact Sheet – Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) - Public Health Agency of Canada

    The World Health Organisation 5 moments describe before during and after contact hand hygiene to prevent cross infection.

    WHO | About SAVE LIVES: Clean Your Hands

    It's good practice to clean your hands when you enter a patient space.

  • Oct 13 '15

    In all honesty, as an employer I wouldn't consider you for interview unless you had the requirements to work in the UK, and if you look at most job minimum specifications state registered nurse as a requirement so you won't be shortlistable unless you have UK registration.

  • Oct 11 '15

    In all honesty, as an employer I wouldn't consider you for interview unless you had the requirements to work in the UK, and if you look at most job minimum specifications state registered nurse as a requirement so you won't be shortlistable unless you have UK registration.


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