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Joined: Sep 7, '06; Posts: 8,670 (25% Liked) ; Likes: 3,986

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  • 2:08 pm

    Awww shucks K+MgS04 and Grumpy thanks for you support.

    Nelfid, sorry you find my post harsh. I really do try to be measured and helpful in my responses but really don't believe in "buttering" people up and giving poor advice. I've re-read and can see why you may view it as harsh but although in hindsight I may alter the wording I'm would stand by the message.

    I have watched too many colleagues take on senior posts before they had the experience to support that position, and tried to support failing nurses who have tried to take on higher grades before they truly know their craft.

    One of the best bits of advice I was given was don't chase the grade too soon. Work, learn, develop and stretch yourself within your current job and when you feel you have moved from novice to expert then consider more seniority.

  • 8:41 am

    Awww shucks K+MgS04 and Grumpy thanks for you support.

    Nelfid, sorry you find my post harsh. I really do try to be measured and helpful in my responses but really don't believe in "buttering" people up and giving poor advice. I've re-read and can see why you may view it as harsh but although in hindsight I may alter the wording I'm would stand by the message.

    I have watched too many colleagues take on senior posts before they had the experience to support that position, and tried to support failing nurses who have tried to take on higher grades before they truly know their craft.

    One of the best bits of advice I was given was don't chase the grade too soon. Work, learn, develop and stretch yourself within your current job and when you feel you have moved from novice to expert then consider more seniority.

  • 4:09 am

    Awww shucks K+MgS04 and Grumpy thanks for you support.

    Nelfid, sorry you find my post harsh. I really do try to be measured and helpful in my responses but really don't believe in "buttering" people up and giving poor advice. I've re-read and can see why you may view it as harsh but although in hindsight I may alter the wording I'm would stand by the message.

    I have watched too many colleagues take on senior posts before they had the experience to support that position, and tried to support failing nurses who have tried to take on higher grades before they truly know their craft.

    One of the best bits of advice I was given was don't chase the grade too soon. Work, learn, develop and stretch yourself within your current job and when you feel you have moved from novice to expert then consider more seniority.

  • May 23

    Awww shucks K+MgS04 and Grumpy thanks for you support.

    Nelfid, sorry you find my post harsh. I really do try to be measured and helpful in my responses but really don't believe in "buttering" people up and giving poor advice. I've re-read and can see why you may view it as harsh but although in hindsight I may alter the wording I'm would stand by the message.

    I have watched too many colleagues take on senior posts before they had the experience to support that position, and tried to support failing nurses who have tried to take on higher grades before they truly know their craft.

    One of the best bits of advice I was given was don't chase the grade too soon. Work, learn, develop and stretch yourself within your current job and when you feel you have moved from novice to expert then consider more seniority.

  • May 23

    Quote from ireallycare
    one years experience as a band 6 or one year experience at any level? a few of my colleagues have said that I will not even be considered for interview for a band 7 post as I have only been qualified a few years. This is my dream job though so I am hopeful. I guess what I am really wondering is how long are people usually qualified before they become band 7 and band 8 nurses. The many band 7 and band 8 nurses that I have met have been qualified for over a decade. I am not sure that experience always counts for alot though.


    A practical answer to your question, for a band 6 staff nurse , I ask for at least 2 years at band 5 in that speciality with evidence of professional development , for a band 7 at least 4 years at band 6 with a MSc / MA or studying towards with a relevant qualification in the specialty

    Some personal, friendly advice you have only been qualified 3 years, your still just learning the basics of being a qualified nurse, my advice, consolidate your experience, learn your speciality, learn from the experience you don't appear to value. As a matron who recruits to senior positions, I wouldn't shortlist a nurse with your inexperience

    Experience counts for a great deal, with experience comes maturity and respect, how to deal with challenges and how to communicate with dignity and respect. Just reading your post above, these would appear to be skills you would benefit from acquiring.

  • May 10

    I've found this whole thread refreshing and very enlightening. I can't imagine living without Universal. Healthcare and I am often intrigued at those who advocate against it.

    What is refreshing is that the debate on this thread has actually been about the ethics of the decision making and who has made that decision rather than demonisng UHC (although I appreciate there are some who still believe the "death panels" exists)

    Excellent thread and discussion.

  • May 10

    Clostridium Difficile is an bacteria found in peoples bowels, it can be found in healthy individuals where is causes no symptoms. It causes problems when normal gut bacteria is compromised for example after taking antibiotic.

    firstly I would ask if your residents are symptomatic, so are they having active diarrhoea? If not then they are likely to be GDH positive (GDH is the abbreviation for Glutamate dehydrogenase, which is a chemical found in C.diff. 2. whether it is causing you an infection. ... If the chemical is found, the result is termed 'GDH positive' which means C.diff is present in the bowel.) But toxin negative which means the bacteria are not active so no infection.

    As far as how you protect yourself, hand washing between each clinical interaction is the key.

  • May 9

    I've found this whole thread refreshing and very enlightening. I can't imagine living without Universal. Healthcare and I am often intrigued at those who advocate against it.

    What is refreshing is that the debate on this thread has actually been about the ethics of the decision making and who has made that decision rather than demonisng UHC (although I appreciate there are some who still believe the "death panels" exists)

    Excellent thread and discussion.

  • May 9

    I've found this whole thread refreshing and very enlightening. I can't imagine living without Universal. Healthcare and I am often intrigued at those who advocate against it.

    What is refreshing is that the debate on this thread has actually been about the ethics of the decision making and who has made that decision rather than demonisng UHC (although I appreciate there are some who still believe the "death panels" exists)

    Excellent thread and discussion.

  • May 9

    I've found this whole thread refreshing and very enlightening. I can't imagine living without Universal. Healthcare and I am often intrigued at those who advocate against it.

    What is refreshing is that the debate on this thread has actually been about the ethics of the decision making and who has made that decision rather than demonisng UHC (although I appreciate there are some who still believe the "death panels" exists)

    Excellent thread and discussion.

  • May 8

    Most international nurses will come to the UK to work at the bedside, there is likely to be an induction period although this will depend on where you work.

    I am not sure why you think 43 is a problem for bedside nursing, I am closer to 50 and still work clinical shifts, and love doing so. Being cooped up in an office or classroom just does not appeal to me at all.

  • May 8

    Quote from tacticool
    Quality of life or not, the parents had their CHOICE and PARENTAL RIGHTS abrogated by a know-it-all National Health System. Their alternative for care in another country was independently funded. They should of had the choice. Socialized medicine equals death panels, plain and simple.
    I have worked in the UK for 30 years the last15 in very senior positions. In that whole time I have never encountered your so called "death panel"

    We occasionally have disagreements between what families believe is in best interests and what the medical teams are advocating at which point we will hold a best interest meeting. At that meeting all interested parties are represented and all have the opportunity to input into that discussion. The views and beliefs of the family are very much considered and extremely important.

    If no agreement is reached and all options to reach that agreement are exhausted (and from my experience w try all options seeking second and even third opinions ) then the medical teams would involve the hospital adult or child safeguarding teams for support. A strategy meeting would be held with an independent reviewer and if this was not able to find a way forward then they would contact the hospital legal team to ask for guidance.

    The legal processes are independent of the hospital (and the government) and provide an impartial review of all of the information to support a decision which is in the best interest of the patient.

    Do we always get it right - no
    But this view that we have death panels is just not accurate.

    There are many flaws in our system, it's not perfect.
    We are underfunded, over stretched, many of us working in the NHS don't like the direction we are heading, driven by finance which sometimes feels at the detriment of quality. BUT most of us are passionate about our NHS because despite that the care we deliver in the main is excellent.

    If you want to demonise Universal Healthcare there are many other reasons you could look a and use but, this case is not one.

  • May 8

    Quote from Apple-Core
    Is the OP from the UK?
    No I believe the OP is a US nurse.

  • May 7

    Quote from broughden
    It was a brain dead body, there was no humanity left. It would be the equivalent of advocating against using a cadaver lab during nursing or med school, because of their "humanity". Frankly, Im not going to "spare the feelings" of someone who doesn't seem to understand basic physiology and yet claims to be in the field of medicine.

    I will ask you the same question I asked the OP, do you think the pt with a cranial cavity full of fluid and lysed neurons was going to spontaneously recover? If so, how?

    I will await your explanation.
    I don't think coffee is questioning the physiology at all but highlighting this is a emotive issue, we can debate and remain compassionate to the tragedy of the situation whilst expressing our thoughts and feelings.

    At the end of the day this was someone's child, and we can acknowledge the futility of further intervention in a respectful and compassionate manner.

  • May 7

    Quote from tacticool
    Quality of life or not, the parents had their CHOICE and PARENTAL RIGHTS abrogated by a know-it-all National Health System. Their alternative for care in another country was independently funded. They should of had the choice. Socialized medicine equals death panels, plain and simple.
    I have worked in the UK for 30 years the last15 in very senior positions. In that whole time I have never encountered your so called "death panel"

    We occasionally have disagreements between what families believe is in best interests and what the medical teams are advocating at which point we will hold a best interest meeting. At that meeting all interested parties are represented and all have the opportunity to input into that discussion. The views and beliefs of the family are very much considered and extremely important.

    If no agreement is reached and all options to reach that agreement are exhausted (and from my experience w try all options seeking second and even third opinions ) then the medical teams would involve the hospital adult or child safeguarding teams for support. A strategy meeting would be held with an independent reviewer and if this was not able to find a way forward then they would contact the hospital legal team to ask for guidance.

    The legal processes are independent of the hospital (and the government) and provide an impartial review of all of the information to support a decision which is in the best interest of the patient.

    Do we always get it right - no
    But this view that we have death panels is just not accurate.

    There are many flaws in our system, it's not perfect.
    We are underfunded, over stretched, many of us working in the NHS don't like the direction we are heading, driven by finance which sometimes feels at the detriment of quality. BUT most of us are passionate about our NHS because despite that the care we deliver in the main is excellent.

    If you want to demonise Universal Healthcare there are many other reasons you could look a and use but, this case is not one.


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