Latest Comments by dream'n

dream'n, BSN, RN 9,809 Views

Joined Aug 28, '06. Posts: 860 (56% Liked) Likes: 2,338

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  • 4

    I absolutely would not attend a meeting at 1400 when I worked the night before OR the night after. Nope, I wouldn't do it. Discuss it one more time (professionally but with utter seriousness) with your supervisor and if he/she continues to be unmovable or uncooperative, find another job.

  • 3
    LadyFree28, WKShadowRN, and Tneo8385 like this.

    I doubt your phone call had anything to do with losing the PRN position. It's probably something totally unrelated, like a bad reference that came in at the last minute or a credit check that raised flags. Could you have failed the drug screening? Who knows, maybe the position itself became a casualty of the unit budget? Don't be hard on yourself. Just wait for the letter to get your answers.

  • 0

    I think some nurses that go to agency nursing don't really understand their expectations. Agency nurses need to be very experienced and quick learners. They also need to be confident in their skills, have a strong nursing foundation, and be flexible. Seems that nurses and agencies aren't always following these guidelines and it is a set up for failure. Even after 23 years, I wouldn't be a good agency nurse. I don't have the quick learning and the ability "to just jump in" mentality. Agency nurses need a particular set of professional and personality skills to thrive.

  • 0

    I don't know about the ICU, but on my old floor we the RNs changed the central line dressings ourselves. And no we did not use Chlorhexidine baths with patients that had IJs/Central lines.

  • 13

    Do not go to work since you are running a fever. And never go to work thinking you may be able to be sent home. In all seriousness, back in 2005 (yes, 2005), I went to work sick and in pain against my better judgement. I got so ill throughout the shift I couldn't even hardly move or think. I was in tears. No one was able to cover for me and that was a most miserable and memorable shift for me.

  • 0

    Employers can do pretty much what they want. Cigarette smoking is legal, but hospitals can make rules regarding whether they will employ smokers or not.

  • 4

    Ugh, cough, hack, gag! Those dry flaky skin particles do me in every time. It's like I can feel myself breathing them into my lungs, ugh. Glad to know that my fellow nurses understand

  • 4

    A coworker that has specifically targeted you that is buddy-buddy with management, I've never seen this scenario turn out for the positive. This person has already affected management's opinion of you for the negative. It feels like going to work and beating your head repeatedly into a brick wall. My recommendation is to leave. Maybe if you can hold out for around 2 more months then give 30 days notice you'll be able to get your year? Again in my experience, once you give notice they will leave you in peace and let you finish out your time more pleasantly (because they got what they wanted). Take the high road and let the two of them roll around in their own muck, life is too short to take such BS.

  • 1
    TriciaJ likes this.

    Quote from Jules A
    When I first heard the term I thought it was just another load of co-dependent nursing BS for PsyDs to do fluffy research on but upon further examination I realized I had it to some degree. For me just recognizing my internal negative dialogue to the 1,000th cluster B patient of the month who was only trying to work me for schedule 2s with no intention at this time of doing any work towards personal growth actually made me feel more at peace, more compassionate for the 1,001+ patients I encountered. In my specialty I need to be cynical and look beyond the surface story but that doesn't mean I need to approach anyone's situation with disdain.
    Preach it honey...those darn cluster B patients can take a toll.

  • 0

    Unfortunately, the US does not have a nursing shortage in most places so a new grad LPN may find it difficult to obtain a license/employment here.

  • 1
    4boysmama likes this.

    I might get flamed here, but on the surface, I would not have immediately considered this a serious-type/sentinal mistake. It's certainly not good and could have important ramifications, but it's not like a full Heparin bag run in over 30 minutes or 50 units of Lispro given to a non-diabetic. Not dressing a wound is not the mountain top of horrific nursing actions. Now I would have spoken with the nurse; Why? Because I would want the same courtesy. Does her documentation clearly state that she dressed three wounds or does it just state that she dressed THE foot wounds? Perhaps she was distracted and not focused, which I agree is not a good or proper thing, but we all have made mistakes. Is it possible that it was accidental? You are not privy to all of her employment information that your supervisors are. So yes I would have spoken to the nurse AND I would have informed my supervisors of the patient complaint and my later assessment of the dressings/wounds (which I would document with a fine toothed comb) but that is where I would have dropped it.

    And did you hear her yourself state that she didn't want her previous issue hidden from the boss? Or is it just gossip you heard from the other nurse involved?

  • 2
    sharpeimom and GerberaDaisy like this.

    For me, I guess it would depend on the pediatric population at your hospital. I could handle a 12 year old appy, but a 5 month old with sepsis, no way. I didn't like pediatrics way, way back during school clinical because of all the medication math calculations, everything is so weight based in little ones.

  • 3

    I was mandated so much in my early career at a LTC, that it's a make it or break it issue with me now. I haven't been mandated in probably 20 years, if it happned I'd stay over, but only due to my license. I would seriously hold it against my employer though and give my notice as soon as I could secure another job. Recently they hired a RN that appeared less than reliable to the shift following mine. When I asked my supervisor what she would do if that new nurse didn't show that night, she insinuated I'd have to stay (The nurse did show up). Needless to say, that didn't sit well with me and I immediately found a new job. I'm too old now and will not play the mandation game for any employer; they might stick me once, but then I'd be out.

  • 2
    k.green17 and dRummiN_KS like this.

    From what I've heard, the Southern California New Grad market is very, very tough

  • 2

    Quote from Here.I.Stand
    This is a truckload of bovine feces. Women -- vulnerable women -- are being sexually violated in their home, and they have every right to protection. Vulnerable adult reports must be made to adult protective services. Your gf is a mandated reporter, so it really doesn't matter what this supervising RN said. (Shame on the supervising RN, by the way. She knows about sexual violence being committed upon residents under her care, and she refuses to help them. "Keeping an eye on him" is not possible when each nurse is responsible for 30 residents. I don't use the phrase "shame on them" lightly, but truly, shame on her.)

    I believe that those being accused in reports can't be given the name(s) of those making the report, so she should be fine job-wise. Even if she wasn't though, could she really sleep at night knowing that she has allowed these women to be violated? Jobs are replaceable. People are not.
    Totally agree. If that was my vulnerable mother being touched inappropriately and staff didn't report it and protect her...


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