Content That dream'n Likes

Content That dream'n Likes

dream'n, BSN, RN 8,213 Views

Joined Aug 28, '06. Posts: 806 (55% Liked) Likes: 2,054

Sorted By Last Like Given (Max 500)
  • Jul 23

    Quote from DelaneyB
    I was reading a post earlier. Normally I love to do that, when I get some downtime I am entertained/educated by posts here and I enjoy it. However I saw something on here that bothered me. It is a recurring theme.

    A user said that since a poster was a nursing student and not a nurse she should change her username. I see that a lot here, other users telling posters to change their name because they are students, or CNAs, etc. Does that really bother you??? It's not like it's that big of a deal. If I was a culinary student I would call myself DelaneyBaker and it would be fine. If I was an engineering student I would call myself DelaneyEngineer. It wouldn't be a big deal. Y'all act as if there aren't millions and millions of nurses in the world and are so prideful. It's not that hard to be a nurse. People from dinky little schools are "nurses". People who did things completely online are "nurses". It isn't a big deal.

    I don't know why this riled me up so much but it did. Sorry for the rant.
    I'm going to excuse your ignorance about what it takes to get through nursing school, pass NCLEX, and work as a nurse. You obviously don't know what you don't know.

    But perhaps you can understand this sentence from the RULES of this message forum:

    8.You agree NOT to use titles that you have not earned. (RN, Dr, LPN, LVN, Nurse, etc)

    http://allnurses.com/terms-info.html

    So when people tell nursing students to change their screen names, that is because they have violated the terms of service that THEY AGREED TO when they signed up. This is a privately owned web site, and they can make the rules.

    So basically, if this bothers you, TOUGH.

  • Jul 23

    It's a recurring theme because some posters do not know that 'nurse' is a legally protected title and some do not read allnurses terms of service before agreeing to them.

  • Jul 23

    "It's not hard to be a nurse." Do you even read these forums? Ever go on the student forum and see the threads asking for help? Ever venture into the NCLEX forum and see the "I failed the NCLEX I feel so bad" threads? How about the threads on the general nursing tab that talks about the emotional and physical toll this job has.

    Reading comprehension...not everyone has it.

    If you're not a nurse, don't say you are.

  • Jul 16

    I don't have any words of wisdom, just want to extend my sympathy, it would so hard to shake such an experience.

    Even though he couldn't be saved, you did ease some of the shock and trauma for the family by taking over and not leaving them completely helpless for the longest 15 minutes of their lives.

  • Jul 16

    None of these fancy calling systems will ever work if you don't have the staff to execute it. We've had everything from different colored lights to 'timing' the responses by manager and people getting reprimanded/written up if not meeting the allowed time, to 'prioritizing' (aide comes in first regardless of what the needs are, and then escalates if necessary), and all it did was just force people to be creative and beat the system because without the adequate staff to provide that level of service, it won't work. Hospitals just need to hire more people for their floors, which is the answer staring right at them that no one wants to pick. And if you even dare to throw that out there, they'll accuse you of not being a part of the answer. Well sorry but if there's a leak in the roof and the only solution is to fix the leak, and you keep trying different sizes and brands of bandages, that's not really being part of the answer.

  • Jul 13

    OF COURSE the colleges will promote direct-entry and fast-tracking. They stand to make a lot of money getting "customers", er, I mean, students. Their programs are ridiculously expensive.

    Just because we can do something, does not mean we necessarily should. I personally don't want an NP caring for me who has zero nursing experience prior. Just my preference as a nearly 20-year nurse myself.

    Best of luck to you whatever you do.

  • Jul 8

    Quote from roser13
    How could you ever be a nurse without undergoing clinicals - which are bedside?

    What experience will you draw on to bolster your advanced practice nursing degree? You can't be advanced anything without being the basic version first.

    I continue to be amazed by the number of folks who want to *be* a nurse without actually, you know, *being* a nurse.
    It doesn't amaze me...it terrifies me.

  • Jul 8

    How could you ever be a nurse without undergoing clinicals - which are bedside?

    What experience will you draw on to bolster your advanced practice nursing degree? You can't be advanced anything without being the basic version first.

    I continue to be amazed by the number of folks who want to *be* a nurse without actually, you know, *being* a nurse.

  • Jul 7

    Quote from holisticallyminded
    As someone who floats for a living (on-call) and ALWAYS has (yes, even in my very first RN job and also before I was an RN and worked in another healthcare area), I just don't think it's a big deal. If you're a nurse, you're a nurse. If you aren't familiar with something, you ask someone else. If you're overwhelmed, you ask for help. The key is honesty and thoughtfulness. As long as you're working in a situation where there are others around (as opposed to home health, etc) there is usually someone to help. Now if there isn't, run for the hills! Otherwise, it'll all become old hat over time.
    Ah, the old "a nurse is a nurse" thinking. Any nurse should be able to function in Peds, OB, OR, Utilization Review, ICU, PICC team, Code Team, PACU, M/S, Oncology, Psych, House Supervisor, Nurse Manager, Neuro, NICU, LTC, Infection Control, Pre-Op clinic, Occ Health, Education, Burns, ED, Cath Lab, EP lab, Radiology, Resource Nurse, Office nurse, Case Management...(I went absurdly overboard for effect). All of those areas have others around to help, so it should go just fine, right?
    Your float pool position is in itself a specialty, and does not reflect the concerns of core staff being floated.

  • Jul 7

    I'm not sure what the consequences would be for outright refusing to float, i'm guessing corrective action. Luckily where i work they would never try to float a med-surg nurse to peds or the ICU, thats completely absurd and dangerous IMO.

    Since my unit (colorectal surgery, med-surg type floor with fairly high acuity post-op patients) is blessedly well-staffed, we are constantly floating out to other units. It is very frustrating when we continuously go to the same poorly/staffed, disorganized, hot mess units; its obvious to everyone that the hospital has no incentive to adequately staff those units when we can just float there! No need to go through the hiring process, train new RNs, or compensate more float pool nurses - just make us float constantly

  • Jul 6

    Quote from BittyBabyGrower
    We get a 3 day unpaid suspension for refusal. That being said, our hospital moved to floating only within that service. Maternal-child only floats NICU-PICU-Nursery-Peds. OB is
    closed. Med-surg to med surg, adult ICU-other adult ICU/ER.

    We we used to do whole house floats and it was awful. I was sent to burns, cardiac, med surg and surgical ICU. Hello, I work with babies, but the thought was we were ICU nurses, sure but a preemie is not a little
    adult! I would tell the charge
    nurse that I needed a resource person and made it quite
    clear what I could and could not
    do. I did feel bad for them
    but I had to make sure I kept my license safe.
    I have NEVER understood why NURSES in the c-suite and in house manager positions would allow a whole house float policy. Would a neonatologist feel comfortable treating a 90-year old? Would a general surgeon feel comfortable delivering a high-risk baby? So why the hell do they think nurses can do it?

  • Jul 5

    Quote from ElectricCabbage
    Every family that I have worked with as we support their loved one is different. All are dealing with something new- losing their loved one- and most are experiencing very acute grief. Most families are excellent, and are in agreement with our general philosophy of care, to promote comfort at end of life. But some aren't. And that is really the crux of this post.

    Some families don't want pain medication, because they want their loved one to be alert. Some families want to keep feeding their loved one, even though they are not alert enough to protect their airways. Some families want their loved one up in the chair all day, despite excruciating pain.
    I agree wholeheartedly with Here.I.Stand.


    If I see a person being physically assaulted in the street I won't ignore it and simply keep on walking, even if the assailant happens to be a family member of the victim. It makes no sense that I wouldn't offer my patients the same protection as I would a random stranger in the street. Unless I know for a fact that my patient's wish is completely in line with what the relatives desire and that the patient has made that decision fully informed about the various treatment options available, I will advocate for treatment that provides comfort, both physical and emotional.

    I'm sure that some of you might think it's harsh to compare the situation with how families wants the patient to be treated with an assault. To me however the similarities are there, even if the motivation behind the act might be quite different. It's my firm belief that we only have the right to choose "excruciating pain" for ourselves, we don't have a right to insist that someone else suffer through it.

    In my line of work, I don't claim the right to have any opinion outside of my professional assessment of a situation.

    How about you?
    It is my professional assessment that no one should have to spend the end of their life in excruciating pain or choking on food unless they themselves (not a family member) explicitly tell the healthcare professionals handling their care, that's what they wish for themselves.

    Patient autonomy matters. Making sure that the patient's wish is respected is in my opinion my responsibility. I don't work end-of-life care but I think this is a duty a nurse has to her/his patients, regardless of the field/area we work in.



    Educating on what is important and how morphine is not "killing" their loved one. That is so ridiculous. I know in my final hours, I want to be as comfortable as possible.
    I agree with you NurseGirl525. I honestly think that's what most people would want.

  • Jul 5

    For me, the issue is if the family's wishes are not in line with *comfort care*. In cases like these --

    Some families don't want pain medication, because they want their loved one to be alert. Some families want to keep feeding their loved one, even though they are not alert enough to protect their airways. Some families want their loved one up in the chair all day, despite excruciating pain.
    I absolutely retain my right to an opinion, because my preeminent duty is to that patient. A family member can refuse to have his own pain treated all he wants -- that dying person's pain is that dying person's pain. Pt's right to have that treated trumps the family's desire to have them alert, or desire to see them in a chair.

    The example of feeding them, again, depends on the pt. When working SNF some years ago, we had a 90 yr old gentleman who was completely oriented, and decided not to be NPO anymore. He was aware he would aspirate and die, and in fact he did. He decided that he would rather enjoy food and live a little less, than survive on tube feeds.

    We all said, good for him. Banana or apple pie, Mr D?

    That's very different than someone who is clearly struggling to eat a meal. If food does not provide comfort, our job is to make families understand that -- and to perform comfort care. Not to drown the pt because it makes them feel better to see food in their loved one's mouth.

  • Jul 1

    Quote from stephatron289
    My favorite is when they want a prior authorization for the EpiPen, even though in their chart and medication information it states "Allergy to peanuts, causes anaphlaxis." I have to sit down and compose myself when those come up.
    Prior auth's are such a load of crap. The doctor prescribed the medication, now they want the same doctor to tell them again, that yes, prescribe the medication. Just another step that probably saves them some small percentage of money from people that give up on that last step. Ugh, I loathe insurance companies.

  • Jun 26

    Quote from dream'n
    Disrespectful and demeaning to the profession of nursing
    That's ok, there's a poster on another thread who feels she is qualified to challenge NCLEX and become a nurse without going through nursing school because she's an RT and is currently working as a CNA because she can't find a job as an RT.

    THAT'S disrespectful and demeaning to the profession of nursing.


close
close