Content That dream'n Likes

Content That dream'n Likes

dream'n, BSN, RN 7,795 Views

Joined Aug 28, '06. Posts: 800 (55% Liked) Likes: 2,005

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  • May 25

    I thought prison was a form or rehabilitation; as long as this person is adhering to guidelines related to HIPAA and has moved past her prior history, I don't see an issue.

    Even people who are "upstanding citizens" have been found to have engaged in similar activity or worse so...

  • May 25

    I don't have any legal background and honestly I could be dead wrong for what I'm about to say. But, isn't prison used as a form of rehabilitation? "She went to federal prison" meaning she served her time. No second chances in life???

    *I hope I don't get chewed off but that's how I feel*[emoji85][emoji85]

  • May 24

    If you think working weekdays is best for you, have you considered a non-nursing career such as; occupational therapy, speech language pathology, respiratory therapy etc?

  • May 24

    Quote from DreamerMW
    I'm sorry for all the unasked-for opinions and negativity that some previous posters offered. And to answer your question, yes, days- only jobs absolutely exist. They are many hospitals who even offer 8-4 and such (one that comes to mind is CHOP). And there are always clinics where you can work 9-5. This is what's beautiful about nursing, it's so versatile. you put enough work and effort into looking, you will likely find a position that works for you. Good luck!!
    I honestly don't think that any of the replies were unkind, I think that they were trying to offer realistic advice to OP. Making it sound like it's relatively easy for a new grad to secure a daytime job when that might not actually be the case depending on OP's location, isn't really helpful in my opinion.

    About the unasked-for opinions, it's something that you get when you post a question on a forum. They might even be helpful because as someone new to a profession there might be questions that you don't yet know that you need to ask. If OP doesn't find them helpful, she is of course free to disregard them.

  • May 24

    We can't predict the future, but at this point in time, most areas of the US are saturated with new grads who cannot find employment. We hear from folks who have looked for 2, 3 years and have sent out thousands of resumes with no luck. I'm hoping that you're aware of the current situation in nursing and have taken that into consideration as you enter nursing school.

  • May 24

    Of course you can ask, but they might say no. You might also find yourself working on Christmas, Easter, etc. Having a child does not entitle you to any special treatment ...but the more you have to offer and the more they need you, the more they'll be willing to negotiate.

  • May 24

    I'm not sure what it is you are seeking here. Your employability a few years in the future can't be predicted under the best of circumstances. Add those kind of restrictions and it's even harder to predict.

  • May 24

    You can ask for whatever you want but a few things to consider,
    Why are you going into a field that is known to have round the clock shifts and ask for special treatment?
    Who do you think should work the evening and night shifts? The experienced, long term employees?
    As a seasoned employee whose kids are older I do try to help out any coworker with younger children but I would have a hard time with any new employee who expected what has taken me years of night shifts to obtain.

  • May 23

    Run like the wind. New license? No orientation? No deal. The comparison to registry nurses is laughable. Most registry nurses are very experienced. And even they get something by way of orientation.

    Even if they somehow figure out how to give you some orientation, they have been so cavalier with you that I would vote for just walking.

  • May 23

    Personally, I am of the opinion that is no one's business why you are calling in. I also worked nights and it can take a lot out of you. I don't feel like we should have to explain why we can not get to work. The important part is that you provide adequate notice so that coverage for the shift may be found. I agree with others that nursing seems to have expectations that you will work no matter the conditions. Take care of yourself because the employer is not going to look out for you.

  • May 23

    Facilities could fix issues like this if they staffed adequately and did not have nurses working rotating shifts which leads to burnout, exhaustion, insomnia, etc. Until then, we will continue to beat one another up for being human. I haven't called out a single time or been late for work a single time in 2.5 years, because I know my companies won't have someone cover and someone else will have to work late or come in on a day off. After a while, working like this takes a toll on all of our mental and physical well being. Hopefully, one day the profession will be in a position to demand different work environments and privileges for us. Until then, we will all continue to kill ourselves for the betterment of others. Don't get me wrong, helping people is the reason I am a nurse. But I should not have to sacrifice my well being to do that. Advocacy is the key. Everyone needs a day off every now and then.

  • May 23

    OP: You do not have to give a reason for calling off. It's your sick time, and your business how you use it.

    That said: there is a real inculturation in healthcare that we are somehow altruistic in showing up for work fatigued. We are not- we are actually putting our patients, ourselves and those who share the roads with us in danger.

  • May 22

    Use your d*** call light. Stop walking out to the nurses station every time you want something because you think you will get it faster. Other nurses may stop in the middle of whatever they are doing and fetch that ice for you, but I'm not. I'm going to finish whatever I'm doing first.

    Treating a heart rate in the 160's is more important than your ice. You walked to the desk so walk a few more feet down the hall and get it yourself!

    Rant over. It's such a beautiful day and I'm craving tacos.

  • May 22

    Tangled lines.

    On the vitals machines, the Pulse Ox and BP cuff lines do NOT need to be tied in multiple knots, people!

    On IVs, it should not take me five minutes to figure out which tubing is connected to which bag because there are three pumps on one pole with more than one piggyback and the lines are all interwoven amongst each other. How does that even happen????

    And then when you toss in the O2 tubing and the call light with the tangled IV lines, that's just the icing on the cake.

    I swear I spend fifteen minutes on each patient just untangling everything so I can do my effing job already! How does that not bother anyone else? How does everyone chart that they completed a line trace on all previous shifts when the only way I could figure it out was to disconnect every line, untangle each one, and reconnect????

    Yep, definitely a BIG peeve for me....

  • May 20

    Quote from dream'n
    Ugh, what a horrible way to go, conscience and aware while your body is assaulted. Where is my DNR paperwork??
    I once thought about getting a "DNR" tattoo on my sternum.


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