Latest Likes For IrishIzCPNP

Latest Likes For IrishIzCPNP

IrishIzCPNP, BSN, MSN, RN, APRN, NP 12,262 Views

Joined Jul 25, '06 - from 'Somewhere over the rainbow...'. IrishIzCPNP is a MSN, CPNP-PC, IBCLC, RLC. She has 'A whole bunch...' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Pediatrics, High-Risk L&D, Antepartum, L'. Posts: 1,395 (34% Liked) Likes: 1,373

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  • Aug 31

    Okay here we go...The program at Drexel is not easy. You will have moments of "wow this is hard" and "are you kidding me" and "do they have any clue what they are doing" and "wow she's an amazing instructor" and more. Be prepared for the full range of emotions.

    The first year has changed a little...they removed a class and then kind of put that into another. But overall the first year isn't bad.
    Patho...I had a GREAT instructor. I know others who had somebody who they were not fond of. That is the first class where it is in your best interest to LEARN everything. This isn't the patho you had before...LEARN!!!! You need to understand the material!!!

    Advanced Pharm...great instructor if you get Zarro. This is again a class where you will need to make sure you learn the material but Zarro is wonderful.

    Pharm for peds...this class was rough but the instructor is VERY approachable. You will see this instructor again in the last year. She is a very nice lady, very approachable, down to earth and just nice.

    The assessment class for peds also has some great instructors and really isn't a bad class. Learn the material...there are no tricks here. The final check out...know exactly what they tell you to know. There are no tricks...you just have to know the process. The nerves are what get you...but the instructors aren't looking for fail you. The instructors are really just making sure you are following the process and not missing an assessment. These instructors are also super sweet and approachable. If you have an issue or are confused...let them know because they will help you.

    Now watch that elective in your first year!!! FYI...later on you may need to take more electives. You need 4.5 credits in order to qualify for financial aid. So your first 3 quarters in the 2nd year won't qualify for financial aid. So what do people do? Well some pay in cash or drop. Then the rest of us take an elective for those 3 other quarters. That ends up being 3 quarters of electives. There are a few certificate programs that are 4 classes...so you can end up taking all 4 classes between the elective you need and the 3 quarters of needing financial aid and get a certificate out of it. There is a certificate for complementary therapies and an autism one (I think this is 4 classes). So keep that issue in mind when picking your elective....you may change how you do things if you need to take the extra classes for financial aid.

    Preceptors....I will be honest that finding your own can be a nightmare. NIGHTMARE. They say everyone always gets a preceptor...that doesn't mean you aren't going to bust your butt finding somebody. I have easily spent 20 hours looking for a preceptor for just the first 2 quarters and with at the times I hear "no" I am kind of at a loss of who to turn to for the last 2 quarters. You will want to formulate a plan of attack...you need to expect to work to get preceptors. You need to know this can take a lot of "man hours" on your part. Be prepared...finding preceptors is not easy.

    Be prepared to spend a lot of time on school....you are not going to breeze through this. I found my RN to be not so bad, my BSN to be mostly easy....this is none of the above LOL This is work. The quarters for clinicals...be prepared to spend 16 hours at your clinical site each week plus you will have class one night a week for 3 hours. They expect you to be there. If you are working full time and have a TON of responsibilities...you will probably need to cut back. You are going to need to have some flexibility. Oh you also have mandatory class online for the peds pharm and the assessment class.

    Hope this helps!

  • Jun 7

    I wrote a letter of resignation with the appropriate number of weeks...and just didn't pick up any shifts. It was easy.

  • Jun 6

    That isn't really a home birth gone wrong. That is a case of poor decision making. Safe home births are exactly that...safe and usually safer than in the hospital. If a mom makes a poor choice against medical advice it doesn't mean that choice is wrong for everyone.

  • Jun 4

    One of the issues I'm having...NPs telling me they can't take an NP student because they are required to take med students. Seriously? I think it's a shame NPs have to educate med students over NP students.

  • May 9

    Quote from MNNICU, RN
    Maybe we just have bad luck in this area? 1 of the deaths and 1 of the babies that ended up severely disabled were considered "low risk". Moms with no prior medical history, baby in the right position, healthy pregnancy... in both of those cases things went wrong really fast with cord complications and they transferred right away but with no oxygen those babies didn't last long. I am in the US where homebirth infant mortality is 4 times higher than in hospital births so it tends to be a bit of a sore subject amongst our coworkers because we see a lot of issues with it. Maybe just our experience?
    Where is your stat that infant mortality is 4 times higher? I have never seen a reputable statistic that is that high.

  • Apr 29

    Quote from MNNICU, RN
    Maybe we just have bad luck in this area? 1 of the deaths and 1 of the babies that ended up severely disabled were considered "low risk". Moms with no prior medical history, baby in the right position, healthy pregnancy... in both of those cases things went wrong really fast with cord complications and they transferred right away but with no oxygen those babies didn't last long. I am in the US where homebirth infant mortality is 4 times higher than in hospital births so it tends to be a bit of a sore subject amongst our coworkers because we see a lot of issues with it. Maybe just our experience?
    Where is your stat that infant mortality is 4 times higher? I have never seen a reputable statistic that is that high.

  • Apr 18

    Quote from ana.saavedra14
    I guess parents want to experience the old ages when women would give birth at home.
    There was once this couple who were very holistic, they were both chiropractors. Mom never had any ultrasound, labs drawn, anything until it was time to deliver the baby at home.. Well she was past 40 weeks and wasn't going into labor. Thankfully the midwife nurse saw this as a red flag and decided to do an ultrasound... baby had CDH ended up passing away. They still said if they were to have another baby, they would do the same (meaning no ultrasounds).

    It's so hard not to judge because it is their decision... but that's why there is technology now, to find out what can be wrong with a baby and plan ahead of time!


    And the outcome would have been different had they known? Maybe not. Interventions also lead to issues and complications...but we try not to talk about that.

  • Apr 13

    Quote from ana.saavedra14
    I guess parents want to experience the old ages when women would give birth at home.
    There was once this couple who were very holistic, they were both chiropractors. Mom never had any ultrasound, labs drawn, anything until it was time to deliver the baby at home.. Well she was past 40 weeks and wasn't going into labor. Thankfully the midwife nurse saw this as a red flag and decided to do an ultrasound... baby had CDH ended up passing away. They still said if they were to have another baby, they would do the same (meaning no ultrasounds).

    It's so hard not to judge because it is their decision... but that's why there is technology now, to find out what can be wrong with a baby and plan ahead of time!


    And the outcome would have been different had they known? Maybe not. Interventions also lead to issues and complications...but we try not to talk about that.

  • Apr 13

    Quote from ana.saavedra14
    I guess parents want to experience the old ages when women would give birth at home.
    There was once this couple who were very holistic, they were both chiropractors. Mom never had any ultrasound, labs drawn, anything until it was time to deliver the baby at home.. Well she was past 40 weeks and wasn't going into labor. Thankfully the midwife nurse saw this as a red flag and decided to do an ultrasound... baby had CDH ended up passing away. They still said if they were to have another baby, they would do the same (meaning no ultrasounds).

    It's so hard not to judge because it is their decision... but that's why there is technology now, to find out what can be wrong with a baby and plan ahead of time!


    And the outcome would have been different had they known? Maybe not. Interventions also lead to issues and complications...but we try not to talk about that.

  • Apr 7

    Quote from BostonFNP

    I know several FNPs that work in WH and are quite successful. FNPs receive a sufficient amount of WH and prenatal training, while not the equivalent of a WHNP, FNPs can offer much to a WH practice.

    This is probably equal to the family doc who thinks he is the best choice to do a delivery.

    I cringe at the family doc who comes in for deliveries. Yes, he has some training but nothing compared to the OB.

    Same thing for WHNP and FNP. Sure he FNP has some training but it isn't to the level of the WHNP. I personally wouldn't see an FNP for my gyn care. The specialty exists and I would insist on a WHNP or a gyn.

    The practices around here only have WHNPs and not FNPs.

  • Apr 1

    You had an "initial contract" that spelled out a time frame? Probably not. I bet there's something about how they may make changed as necessary.

    Your best bet....grow up, move on and accept the change.

  • Mar 18

    Quote from cardiaccath456
    I think everyone can see that harm was done in this instance. But the gist of the article, and what I took from it was that mistakes happen, but you can rise above it. Hence the title, failure is an option. From what I have heard from every instructor that I have had, all nurses by the way, they have all made mistakes. And I don't see what me not being a nurse has anything to do with me being able to recognize harm. That was not the point of this post.


    The OP stated neither mom nor baby injured. Wrong. Not recognizing that they were injured/harmed is an issue. If the OP wants I come along and act like something was learned...it is important to acknowledge the harm that was done. You not being a nurse gives you a pass for not understanding the importance of knowing when you have caused an injury or harmed a patient. I don't take issue with what was done...but the statement that nobody was injured.

  • Mar 18

    Quote from cardiaccath456
    I thought the story was very inspirational. People make errors. It is pretty much a guarantee that you will make an error in your nursing practice. I would hope that others would be much more forgiving and less judgmental than you. Would you also sue pharmacy and the nurse assigned to the patient as well?



    You missed the point. The OP stated there was no harm from the mistake. That statement is wrong. There was harm. I was pointing out that the OP needs to see that there was harm...causing major abdominal surgery is harm. So inspirational story but a nurse who couldn't see the harm caused. This isn't about who I would sue but the inability to recognize fault and harm caused. You missed the point and the OP missed their fault...that is scary.

  • Mar 18

    Great story but I have one issue...

    You said nobody was harmed when you hung the insulin. Wrong. Mom and baby were harmed. They had a significant drop in blood glucose and mom had a c-section because of it. She had major abdominal surgery and baby did not experience normal birth. She may have been at risk for a section prior to your mistake but that doesn't mean the section was okay. So there was harm and it is really important you know that.

    I would have been livid if I was a patient and had a section because of your mistake. I assure you...that mistake would have haunted you if I was the patient and I'm not a law suit person (kid with CP and I wouldn't dream of suing and I have a foreign body in me from medical care and again I opted to not sue). You did cause harm. Period.

  • Mar 14

    That isn't really a home birth gone wrong. That is a case of poor decision making. Safe home births are exactly that...safe and usually safer than in the hospital. If a mom makes a poor choice against medical advice it doesn't mean that choice is wrong for everyone.


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