Latest Comments by Extra Pickles

Extra Pickles 10,750 Views

Joined Jan 26, '16. He has 'Enough for now' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'several'. Posts: 1,518 (66% Liked) Likes: 4,106

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    You asked for some really good advice. I'm going to give you some excellent advice. If you want to be a nurse at this point go back to a nursing school. Start over, do it again.

    Seriously, 23 years have passed since you graduated?? You have attempted the NCLEX 5 times?? It's time to stop and learn again. I can't even imagine the changes in nursing from the time you received your education to now. It is unfathomable to me that anyone can expect you to now enter the field of Nursing after 23 years, zero experience, it's just absurd in my opinion. If you still wish to be a nurse, go to school to be one. Don't try to keep passing an exam for which you are so very unprepared.

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    My first suggestion would be to edit your post and change your user name, you might find that having your full name known on a website as large as this isn't a good idea. Just a word of caution.

    Next suggestion is to let go thinking about specializing for now. There is SO much to learn and do between the start of nursing school---which for you is still 5-7 months away!--and the end. Even those who are 100% sure what it is they want to do when they graduate will frequently find they change their minds a couple of times. Be open to those changes, you might be a great fit for what you are interested in now and you might not. Or what interests you now might NOT interest you later once you get down to the nitty-gritty of what the job actually entails.

    And with that said you've managed to name two areas of nursing that are usually very competitive as far as getting a foot in the door. Many places will want to see a year, two or three years of experience in med-surg before giving you a shot in a Maternity unit. Not always, but you should expect that to be likely.

    For now your focus is on school and all that it entails. After all if you don't successfully navigate that, the rest is moot

    Good luck!

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    beautyofnursing likes this.

    Quote from beautyofnursing
    . I also found online nursing school, however, I want to be more hands on to enhance my personal learning skill as a nurse.

    Do you have any suggestions/recommendations?
    Online programs are for people who already hold nursing licenses and wish to get a higher degree. You cannot attend nursing school online to become a nurse in the first place. Hands-On is necessary but it is required, not as a matter of preference but as mandatory for the clinical component of your nursing education. That said, you have received some very good advice.

    Final thought might be whether you are willing to relocate? Are your ties so great to your current community that you can't consider moving to a less impacted area? It's worth mentioning that even if you get accepted to a nursing program finding a job in California upon graduation is more like locating the Holy Grail than not. Just something to think about.

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    If it is mandatory, something that your professors would need to verify, wouldn't they provide you with the website information? Or is it more of a guideline, something to use for studying in your final semester? You can always get an NCLEX prep book if you need to show questions you've done.

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    xxstarrynitesxx likes this.

    Don't sell yourself short. Like the others here said, you're predicting a dismal outcome based on nothing at all. Some of the very students you admire as having all the answers might turn out to be the ones who freeze in an emergency/panicked moment, it's too early to predict for them and it's too early to predict for you. Give yourself a chance! I personally would be hard-pressed to come up with every answer to every question now that I've been many years out of nursing school but what IS important is that I know what to DO when situations arise. I learned that by finishing school and spending years honing the skills needed to be a good nurse. NO ONE in your student classes is anywhere near that, please believe me. You are most likely voicing the same concerns at least half of the students in your classes is also feeling. And then there are those students who are too foolish or full of themselves to know when they should be questioning themselves.

    One day at a time. Talk with your advisor about your concerns if you need feedback one-on-one but honestly I believe you are overthinking your prognosis. You'll get there

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    Oldmahubbard and Irishlad like this.

    Hello! I think you'd probably get the most useful information if you posted these questions in the World Nursing forum, this one tends to be very USA-centric.

    A consideration to mention before I go is that you should be careful about requirements for licensing in whatever country you wish to practice nursing. Are you certain that an education in Spain allows you to get a license in Ireland, and vice-versa? Neither of those routes will allow you to practice in the US without jumping through many hoops, which is of course possible but often proves costly and time absorbing. Just something to think about while you're researching your options. Good luck.

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    RainMom likes this.

    so OP what do you think of all this? Since now you know you can get tested upon acceptance and/or at the start of a semester and/or at the start of a new clinical placement and/or at the end and/or randomly and/or never, LOL, what's your next move?

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    Quote from ermerm0213
    Thanks so much you guys! I appreciate the encouragement <3
    you're welcome. I'll even share a personal story. I remember my first job, the absolute cold fear getting off the elevator onto my floor and the heavy weight pressing down on me as I walked closer and closer to my unit doors. It wasn't that I hated my job I just was terrified of being assigned a patient who was too sick for me to handle, had too many meds I didn't know, had a wounSod care or treatment that was beyond me, like that. I was sensible and careful and paid attention and knew I could go to the charge nurse for help and when I was still on orientation, go to my preceptor. I knew this. I also knew it didn't stop me from being terrified

    Someone from my graduating class was also on this unit and had started a short time before me because I took time after graduation to study for NCLEX and he put in application right away, got working right away. He had no problem bragging about how much more "experienced" he was than me (can you imagine how stupid that sounds to me now??). And for all his showboating he was also the first one of my new-hire group to be written up for a med error, the first one to be reprimanded for missing a new order and the first one dragged into the Nurse Manager's office because of a patient's family members' complaints. Can't believe I still remember this, but I guess it's because at the time he made me feel like *I* was the one who didn't know enough, was too timid, didn't just jump right into the fray (which is almost always the stupidest thing you can do if you don't know what you're doing!). Time moved on, he moved on to another job, eventually so did I. Last I knew, which was just a few years after graduation, he'd been bragging about how he was being groomed for management when in fact he was about to get fired. Karma is something, isn't it?

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    In my opinion anyone who has a brand new license and on their first job who doesn't have that fear is a walking danger zone. Of course you are afraid of what you don't know. You don't know much yet, LOL, and that's where the learning begins, after the NCLEX :-)

    Not much scarier than a brand new nurse who feels super confident in his abilities because he passed a minimum competency exam but hasn't yet learned what comes after.

    You'll be fine

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    SurgicalTechCST likes this.

    To the OP since you started this thread with the intention of finding out if anyone has ever heard of a nursing student successfully avoiding mandatory vaccinations I will answer no to that. I have worked in a variety of healthcare settings, have had many interactions with many students from many schools over many years. And the answer is very simple and straightforward: the reason the word mandatory is used for those vaccinations is because they are not, in fact, optional. They are not to be waived. You could get titers drawn to check for immunity that exists already. Obviously no one is going to insist on giving you a vaccination against a disease for which you are already immune. But if your titers show that you have no immunity and the vaccinations are required, you should be prepared to get them, period.

    This is a discussion that goes on and on and on and on, every year around flu season, ad nauseum. I am not going to debate with you the merits of vaccination, I always thought it was pretty clear from the huge mountain of scientific data on the topic. You have every right to refute that for yourself, you do not have the right to expect others to waive these requirements because of "sincerely held" beliefs or for any other reason. You may find a school somewhere that lets something go. You may find a clinical site that does that. But to expect the ability to complete your nursing education in its entirety without receiving mandatory vaccinations at some point is honestly just naive and overly idealistic. I do wish you good look in whatever other avenue you pursue outside of healthcare. Someone here mentioned your interest in Midwifery, have you considered becoming a doula? Someone who is not a medical professional, not a nursing professional, but just a lay person who is helpful at births? Not going to get into all aspects of that, LOL, I just know that doulas exist, no nursing license required. Just a thought anyway. Good luck.

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    NurseBlaq, Bigmamalexii, Quota, and 13 others like this.

    Maybe a better question then when do they do drug testing is when are you planning to quit using drugs? Based on this thread, you could get tested at the beginning, part way through, the middle, the end, never, or randomly. Doesn't seem to be of much help. What Would be helpful is to avoid the issue in the first place!

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    So many differences in nursing! Although I would have expected significant differences between the US and some other country's, I had no idea that the UK would be so very different from us. Interesting indeed!

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    It's a horrible spot to be in but all you can do now is wait. Hang in there!

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    Every application requires fees to be paid.


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