Why is Med-Surg so hated? - page 8

Whenever I have told a fellow newer grad that I want to work in a hospital, they ask 'where?' And I say 'probably Med-Surg' and then they crinkle their nose. I just want to get my start in acute care... Read More

  1. by   working bee
    I dont like med surg. I like taking care if patients medically too. I hate being at a job and can't even use the bathroom. How do you enjoy a career like that. Thats why Im doing a year in med surg, then going to different department, either ER, OR, L and D.
  2. by   Rose_Queen
    Quote from working bee
    I dont like med surg. I like taking care if patients medically too. I hate being at a job and can't even use the bathroom. How do you enjoy a career like that. Thats why Im doing a year in med surg, then going to different department, either ER, OR, L and D.
    The grass isn't always greener on the other side. It's not so much about the type of department as it is the management and adequate staffing.
  3. by   LadyFree28
    Quote from working bee
    I dont like med surg. I like taking care if patients medically too. I hate being at a job and can't even use the bathroom. How do you enjoy a career like that. Thats why Im doing a year in med surg, then going to different department, either ER, OR, L and D.
    Sometimes in the ER, you will find yourself scarfing down food and barely going to the bathroom as well, especially if you are working with a skeleton crew and 60-deep perpetually in the waiting room.

    Different area, same problems...
  4. by   ®Nurse
    Quote from working bee
    I dont like med surg. I like taking care if patients medically too. I hate being at a job and can't even use the bathroom. How do you enjoy a career like that. Thats why Im doing a year in med surg, then going to different department, either ER, OR, L and D.
    You can 'not use the bathroom' in ER, OR, L&D, ICU, etc......
  5. by   bear14
    Could not agree with you more!!! It's true. I no longer buy lunch because we rarely have time to get away even to a vending machine for the much needed Coke. I try to run in back when my patients are stable and scarf something down plus bring snacks to keep my blood sugar stable.
  6. by   PacoUSA
    I dislike med-surg because the ratios are always high. Rarely do I get less than 5 patients at a time. Thank God for my training in telemetry as it is my saving grace for getting a lower ratio than for non-monitored patients. I actually enjoy seeing patients' rhythms on the screen as opposed to walking in the room to see if they are breathing (I still check on them in the room but at least that is not my only guideline). By year's end, I hope to be in a different specialty.
  7. by   isis07734
    I think some ppl view it as a starting point, bc it's so physical it would hard to be a retiring time job when one is older. The social aspect can be hard for some, some of these people are here so often they work the system, while management is pushing for hotel customer service. Add that to an increased acuity level, and it can be tough.

    BUT

    It's that toughness that will make you stronger. I've been working med-surg for about 5 years, i'm gearing up for a switch, but it def took me some time to feel comfortable managing it all. I work on a 36 bed unit, and often charge.
  8. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from isis07734
    I think some ppl view it as a starting point, bc it's so physical it would hard to be a retiring time job when one is older. The social aspect can be hard for some, some of these people are here so often they work the system, while management is pushing for hotel customer service. Add that to an increased acuity level, and it can be tough.

    BUT

    It's that toughness that will make you stronger. I've been working med-surg for about 5 years, i'm gearing up for a switch, but it def took me some time to feel comfortable managing it all. I work on a 36 bed unit, and often charge.
    What's a "ppl"? What does "bc" mean? "Def"?

    Med/Surg is a great starting point. You see a lot, and you can learn a lot. It's a great place to learn time management, to see a lot of different disease processes and it's a wonderful place for a new nurse to learn what aspects of the job she loves, which she hates and which she barely tolerates.

    I started in Med/Surg and found out that oncology fascinated me, so my next job was on an Oncology/Hematology floor. When I burned out on Oncology, I remembered my second love -- cardiology -- from my days on Med/Surg and spent the rest of my career in CCU and CTICU. I don't regret for a moment the time I spent learning the basics on Med/Surg. As you say, it makes you stronger -- as a nurse, as a time manager and as a person.
  9. by   isis07734
    Not sure if your serious..

    People, because, definitely.
  10. by   isis07734
    *You're

    (phone typing)
  11. by   RN-dancer
    Amen to that!
  12. by   OUxPhys
    I like my cardiac stepdown but it can get crazy at times, especially on days. You can blame upper hospital management and the government for making med/surg so miserable.
  13. by   coneal783
    I'm an NA, currently in nursing school, and I work on a med-surg floor. The nurses have 4-5 patients until 2300, then have 5-6 patients until 0700 (meanwhile the NAs end up having 11 patients from 2300 until 0700.) The acuity of our patients seems to be going up and up, with no more staffing. Most of our patients require some significant medical care, as well as moderate assistance with ADLs. A lot of our patients probably would benefit from being in an ICU step down unit instead of med-surg. I have learned a ton being on med-surg, but I will be looking at other departments once I become an RN.

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