Choice of path

  1. 0
    I would like to get into nursing and was wondering if becoming a lpn first was a better path rather than going to school to be a RN
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  3. 8 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    The short answer: It really depends on your situation.

    Generally, if you can get admitted to an RN program right now and there is no barrier (e.g. financial) for you, then that's probably the best thing for you do. But certain circumstances may make getting an LPN first more appealing.

    For example, when I decided to become an LPN first, the reasoning seemed pretty sound: I could afford to leave my old job and focus solely on school for one year but not two, and if I had to work through part of school I'd rather be working as an LPN than continue doing what I was doing before (which involved a lot of the negatives of nursing (high burnout, frequently short-staffed) but with terrible pay). I looked at an LPN as the quickest way to get into nursing and increase my pay, with the possibility of working for an employer that would provide tuition assistance for the rest of my schooling.

    The economy tanking in the middle of my LPN program screwed my plan pretty badly. If I knew then what I know now, I probably would have done a quick CNA program and worked as a CNA while going straight for my RN. I do feel like I'm very close to getting a great job I just interviewed for, though (it took me 4 months for that first interview!), so it may yet work out for me.
  5. 0
    Do you have any recommendations for lpn programs in the DMV
  6. 0
    I'm not sure what you are referring to by "DMV". I would recommend that you do what I did: Check out the Maryland Board of Nursing website and follow the appropriate links to see the lists of approved LPN and RN programs. Look them up to see which are close enough to you (look up addresses and check them on Google maps or whatever if you have to). Take that list of schools and narrow it down further by looking through the school websites to see which programs (and tuition rates!) might work for you; some schools are better than others about having thorough up-to-date information on their nursing programs.

    Now take the schools that remain on your list and start calling them to gather more information about their nursing programs. You want to know what prerequisites you need, what the application deadlines are, how they schedule their classes and clinicals, their admissions criteria, etc. Then take any prereqs that you still need to take and start applying to the programs.
  7. 0
    I plan on applying for the nursing program at Frederick Community College when my prereqs are done. After the first semester, students can take the CNA exam (without paying for a CNA class, as NU101 covers the same thing), and about halfway or so through the RN program you can test to become an LPN, and so potentially work as one for the remainder of the program.

    Also-I assume "DMV" is the Delaware/Maryland/Virginia area, also known as DelMarVa around here.
  8. 0
    Thanks for the clarification; I've only lived in MD about 4 years or so and hadn't seen it abbreviated like that before.

    In that case, I'd also recommend looking at the Virginia and Delaware board of nursing websites for the lists of schools there. I'm pretty sure every BON website has a list of their State's approved/accredited nursing programs.

    I think Harford County CC is another one that has an RN program with an option to be eligible for LPN licensure after the first year. And I believe being able to apply to be a CNA after the first semester is true with all (or at least most) of the nursing programs.
  9. 0
    Quote from Mama2fiveboys
    I plan on applying for the nursing program at Frederick Community College when my prereqs are done. After the first semester, students can take the CNA exam (without paying for a CNA class, as NU101 covers the same thing), and about halfway or so through the RN program you can test to become an LPN, and so potentially work as one for the remainder of the program..
    I followed the CNA and challenged the LVN and worked as a student nurse while in school. If you can juggle full time nursing school and working, go for it. Remember, nursing school is demanding (time and psychologically).
  10. 0
    Quote from Mama2fiveboys
    I plan on applying for the nursing program at Frederick Community College when my prereqs are done. After the first semester, students can take the CNA exam (without paying for a CNA class, as NU101 covers the same thing), and about halfway or so through the RN program you can test to become an LPN, and so potentially work as one for the remainder of the program.

    Also-I assume "DMV" is the Delaware/Maryland/Virginia area, also known as DelMarVa around here.

    DMV is DC/Maryland/Virginia area. There are a lot of LPN programs in DC too such as UDC, Comprehensive Health, Radians.. Here's a list of programs in DC included in their newsletter, also it has their pass rates. http://newsroom.dc.gov/show.aspx/age...8314/year/2009
  11. 0
    I would recommend becoming a cna and working towards getting your RN. I've been an LPN since November and haven't had a single interview. Decided to go into the Army, really need full time work with benefits...luckily they will pay for more school and I'll eventually get my RN someday


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