Accelerated programs...expensive or cheap? - page 2

Okay, I realize that none of the programs are cheap but I was accepted to John's Hopkins last year and deffered it for a year. I am a 45 yo male that is switching careers. I am wondering if it is... Read More

  1. by   ricky75
    Hey John,

    It all depends if you can afford to pay that much. JHU is very reputed school and you will land a good job after finishing but the salary will depend on the degree you get.

    You might work 30 more years and JHU chip will look good if you can afford and live comfortably.

    BTW where did you do your prereq's and how much time did you took finishing it? I am also in Bay area.

    Gud Luck
  2. by   ImThatGuy
    I don't think any degree in nursing is worth $62,000. I just can't imagine the role of a nurse is going to be impacted by the name cache of any particular institution.
  3. by   hokiefanatic
    I chose to complete a regular BSN program over the accelerated programs only for the costs associated with the programs. I was accepted to Duke's program, but it would have cost 90k. If you are planning on going to grad school and making NP money it might be worth it. However if your plan to make RN money I would suggest just going with the regular 2 year program.

    Also if you are looking at an accelerated program that means you already have one bachelor's degree. So I'd say most people are already in some debt from that first 4 years of college. I wouldn't dig a financial hole you can't get out of. I know the thought of having to go back to an undergraduate program after already completing one degree sucks, but it's much cheaper.
  4. by   ParkerBC,MSN,RN
    I think it depends on your goal. If you’re not planning on becoming an administrator or educator, then I would not consider the school.
    I was unable to relocate because of family and a mortgage. If was able to, you better believe I would be attending John Hopkins University or the like. However, I plan on going to graduate school to work on a PhD in Nursing Science next fall after I graduate in April. I am interested in becoming a professor/researcher, so a good undergraduate school, I think, warrants it.
    Just depends on what you want to do. Also, there have been a few commenting on waiting lists at state schools. That is something I also took into consideration. If I have to wait for two years to get into a program, then that is two years of salary I miss out on. When you compare those numbers to the cost of private schooling, you still end up ahead versus waiting and hoping to get a spot. Time is money too and often people forget that.
  5. by   arprew2
    Maybe its just a location thing but here in Kentucky I have never heard of waiting lists for nursing schools. At every school I looked at in KY you apply the semester before you want to go to school and you go from there. I am in an ADN program at Eastern Kentucky University and I really like it here, the teachers are awesome and the students are a good mix of young and old. We have about 8 guys out of about 100 students that started the program.
  6. by   arprew2
    If you just want to get your RN than just pick a school with a good board pass rate and go for it... in my opinion if you can pass all the boards and have a job market that is looking for nurses then it doesn't really matter where you go to school.
  7. by   PMFB-RN
    Quote from hokiefanatic
    I was accepted to Duke's program, but it would have cost 90k. If you are planning on going to grad school and making NP money it might be worth it. However if your plan to make RN money I would suggest just going with the regular 2 year program.
    Most of the NPs in the medical center where I work make LESS than I do as a staff RN in the SICU. They went into NP for the schedual, not the pay. I know that some of them took pay cuts to do NP. Pretty hard to find NPs in my area that make over 80K.
  8. by   hokiefanatic
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    Most of the NPs in the medical center where I work make LESS than I do as a staff RN in the SICU. They went into NP for the schedual, not the pay. I know that some of them took pay cuts to do NP. Pretty hard to find NPs in my area that make over 80K.
    I'm from a rural area in Virginia where NP's make upwards of 90k per year (VERY good money because the cost of living is quite low). A FNP might make a bit less but we are in desperate need of mental health NP's and CRNA. A CRNA I shadowed (area I would like to specialize in) makes 200k+ annually.

    I assume it all depends on where you live. I know DNP's now have an upper hand getting the jobs they want in my area (many universities in the area now have DNP programs). So in order to get those high salaries and convenient hours you have to have that DNP. But the major hospital systems in the area are paying nursing students to get advanced degrees. So if you're willing to put in the work it's a very nice deal!
  9. by   PMFB-RN
    I'm from a rural area in Virginia where NP's make upwards of 90k per year (VERY good money because the cost of living is quite low).

    *** I live in a rural area of Wisconsin. As a staff nurse in the SICU I make $87K and change with good benifits At my hospital new grads start at $64K. Cost of living here is very low as well.

    A FNP might make a bit less but we are in desperate need of mental health NP's and CRNA. A CRNA I shadowed (area I would like to specialize in) makes 200k+ annually.

    *** Of course but CRNAs are NOT NPs. Whole different kettel of fish.

    I assume it all depends on where you live. I know DNP's now have an upper hand getting the jobs they want in my area (many universities in the area now have DNP programs). So in order to get those high salaries and convenient hours you have to have that DNP.

    *** If I wanted to spend 8 years in college, plus spend at least a couple years getting experience I would expect to make a LOT, LOT more than $100K. Seems silly to me to spend all that time getting DNP. PA school is only two years (assume BS degree already) and CRNA school is 27 months. PAs who are not involved in surgery make about what NPs make, surgery PAs make much more.

    But the major hospital systems in the area are paying nursing students to get advanced degrees. So if you're willing to put in the work it's a very nice deal!

    *** Well I respectfully disagree. I think it's a terrable deal. The cost of the school is minor, the real cost is in time. The DNP represent a significant increase in investment of time and money (cost, lost wages, etc) without an increase in pay. Maybe where you live it is different but the DNP prepared NPs at my medical center start at exactly the same pay as masters prepared NPs. The DNP prepared CRNA grads expected to start applying soon will not be starting at a higher wage.
    I think PA and CRNA school offer much better return on investment than the DNP NP does.
  10. by   pexx84
    Quibbling around the edges, at least in my area of the country, accelerated BSN programs are significantly more competitive to get into than Direct Entry MSN programs. When I was applying to schools (both Accelerated and Direct Entry programs), I followed the class size/applicants ratios fairly closely. The Accelerated ratios were about 1/10; the Direct Entry about 1/4. Of course, this may vary in other areas.

    It seems counterintuitive at first, but not after you think about it. Both programs are designed for career changers. Many career changers have accumulated responsibilities, and simply can't take off three years for a Direct Entry program. However, gritting your teeth and soldiering through a 14-18 month accelerated program is doable, if not pleasant.

    Regarding the original post, Johns Hopkins sounds expensive, but, of course, you get the name. My private school tuition for an accelerated program is just over half of what Johns Hopkins charges. Of course, nobody has ever heard of my school!


    Quote from Jevell - AMPNN
    Most top private schools that offer the accelerated BSN/MSN programs for non-nursing college graduates (accelerated MSN a lot harder to get into) charge around the same for tuition ($50 - 70K). I was accepted to University of Rochester and It cost me $60K for the first year of my accelerated MSN - PMHNP program.
  11. by   PMFB-RN
    Quote from pexx84
    It seems counterintuitive at first, but not after you think about it. Both programs are designed for career changers. Many career changers have accumulated responsibilities, and simply can't take off three years for a Direct Entry program.
    *** Just curious but why are those direct entry masters three years instead of the regular two or less for direct entry masters?
  12. by   pexx84
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** Just curious but why are those direct entry masters three years instead of the regular two or less for direct entry masters?
    I'm not aware of any/many 24 months or less Direct Entry Masters programs.
  13. by   Jevell - AMPNN
    Quote from pexx84
    Quibbling around the edges, at least in my area of the country, accelerated BSN programs are significantly more competitive to get into than Direct Entry MSN programs. When I was applying to schools (both Accelerated and Direct Entry programs), I followed the class size/applicants ratios fairly closely. The Accelerated ratios were about 1/10; the Direct Entry about 1/4. Of course, this may vary in other areas.

    It seems counterintuitive at first, but not after you think about it. Both programs are designed for career changers. Many career changers have accumulated responsibilities, and simply can't take off three years for a Direct Entry program. However, gritting your teeth and soldiering through a 14-18 month accelerated program is doable, if not pleasant.

    Regarding the original post, Johns Hopkins sounds expensive, but, of course, you get the name. My private school tuition for an accelerated program is just over half of what Johns Hopkins charges. Of course, nobody has ever heard of my school!

    Hello pexx84 !

    Some your statements don't seem to be completely accurate in regards to MSN Direct Entry Programs...I am in one. First, when you apply to an MSN program, you are in fact applying to the accelerated BSN (12 months) and the MSN (24 - 36 months...depending on specialty) programs together (You can't go into MSN portion with out the RN piece). So, you have to be accepted into the BSN program before you get an OK and interview for the MSN portion. So, how can the BSN program at your school be more competitive than the Direct Entry MSN? Schools of Nursing have more spot for BSN students because there are more instructors qualified to teach them and the BSN require less resources from the school and healthcare facilities associated with programs (As opposed to both BSN & MSN components). The people I know who applied to nursing schools that offered the Direct Entry Program (and myself) were told if they were not selected for the limited spots they had for the Direct Entry MSN program that they would be offer the accelerated BSN. The schools included in my "research": Yale, Columbia, University of Rochester, and NYU.
    Last edit by Jevell - AMPNN on Dec 16, '10

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