No exp. LVN hired. Scared/Confused help?

  1. 0
    Hello everyone, today is my second orientation day at a subacute here in CA. I am very fortunate that this employer took me in as a new grad. So far they have me following an LVN and a Tx nurse, and they somewhat taught me how to document in addition to med pass and wound Tx.

    The reason I'm scared is because a lot of what is going on with charting, documenting, taking orders, or whatever an LVN does with exp. I do NOT know! I'm scared they will just throw me out there next week and I will have no clue what I'm suppose to be doing, where I should be looking according to documenting, like I said no exp!

    All I know what to do in case they do is get report, get your pts. pass your meds and that's it! Ill ask for help but man, this is so confusing!!

    Has any of you LVN's out there been through this and how did you deal with it? Or any RN's that has helped someone like me before? Any tips, or important questions I should ask?<br>

    Thanks for your replies!
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  4. 11 Comments so far...

  5. 3
    At some point you will be thrown to the wolves, it is just a question of when. Here is what I did when I was on by myself
    1 get report on the patients. Next check if the patients are all right. Pass your meds. then treatments then second med pass then check the patients. then chart, then give report then go home. don't make this plan concrete things go wrong often.
    Stay flexible. It will be Hell until you can find your own system. Stay loose and always ask for help if you need it.or your in doubt.
    andreasmom02, lpnholly35, and itsmejuli like this.
  6. 0
    Ask questions and do self-study on your patient's conditions and the medications you are passing. For RNs and LVNs, the first few months is like drinking from the firehose. Hang in there, be observant and form good habits early in your career. Best of luck to you.
  7. 0
    Great advice! Any suggestions for a new LPN who's being trained to work on a behavioral health unit (sub acute). I'm so nervous all 7 of my friends are nurses, theyre all excited about me having a job but when i mention the unit ill be working on the conversation becomes dry with no feedback. Im not a new grad ive been a LPN for 5 yrs just never worked. I was an excellent student lecture/theory and clinicals. As soon as i got my license nov. 06, i immediately went back to school to pursue my RN then ended up pregnant in 07 had baby 08 pregnant again in o8 had baby in 09. Now im ready, just a bit nervous. please help
  8. 0
    Then we are on the same boat, no exp! This facility has patients on rehab, long term, and sub acute. I'm going to be a float nurse so documentation is different with everyone. Some are under medicare which consists of I think assessments every shift, subacute wants only daily blah blah so confusing. Thank god I'm working 7pm-7am since its not so hectic and people aren't busy so they can help! And they better! I don't care if I **** them off my butt is on the line here!
  9. 2
    Quote from lpnholly35
    Great advice! Any suggestions for a new LPN who's being trained to work on a behavioral health unit (sub acute). I'm so nervous all 7 of my friends are nurses, theyre all excited about me having a job but when i mention the unit ill be working on the conversation becomes dry with no feedback. Im not a new grad ive been a LPN for 5 yrs just never worked. I was an excellent student lecture/theory and clinicals. As soon as i got my license nov. 06, i immediately went back to school to pursue my RN then ended up pregnant in 07 had baby 08 pregnant again in o8 had baby in 09. Now im ready, just a bit nervous. please help
    Never trust a patient, never give out personal information, not even the smallest thing. Such as where did you work before, what school did you go to, Do you have any children.
    Never get in between to patients if they are fighting. Never except anything from a patient.
    Never talk about the problems of your job to a patient. Never turn your back on them. That's all I can think off at this time.
    maelstrom143 and andreasmom02 like this.
  10. 1
    I think this is a total normal feeling as a new nurse. I feel the same way. I became an LPN in '08, but was a stay at home mom until 2 1/2 months ago, when I took a LPN job in a clinic setting. I have been there 2 1/2 months, and am slowing learning, but still feel it's either "sink or swim" while working there! lol I have questions every day, and know I drive the doctors nuts asking them so much. But I would rather ask a 1,000 questions a day, and look stupid, before accidentally hurting a patient when doing a procedure or giving medicine. My advice is if you aren't sure about something, ask. Study your nursing books, study online nursing material, and study things that you are doing at work. I think it's just all part of the first year of nursing. I still feel very nervous every day at work, but it's slowly getting easier. Good luck to you...
    Merlyn likes this.
  11. 1
    i graduated from lpn school in oct, passed my boards in jan this year. with no experience in health care except clinicals, it has not been easy finding a job as a newly graduated lpn here in ny. after a month of applying i have been offered a ft position in long term care (exactly where i wanna be i start orientation next week and am nervous as hell. i love the use of "like drinking from a fire hose". wet behind the ears won't even be close to what i will be, soaking wet from head to toe in places i didn't know i had is more like it, this i know. keep your head up and just remember, you have accomplished so much, have come such a long way. school and the boards were not easy. always ask questions, always be willing to learn, and never fear being ignorant. i would rather be called ignorant for not knowing, than stupid for guessing and causing harm.
    Merlyn likes this.
  12. 0
    Quote from gracetoo71
    i graduated from lpn school in oct, passed my boards in jan this year. with no experience in health care except clinicals, it has not been easy finding a job as a newly graduated lpn here in ny. after a month of applying i have been offered a ft position in long term care (exactly where i wanna be i start orientation next week and am nervous as hell. i love the use of "like drinking from a fire hose". wet behind the ears won't even be close to what i will be, soaking wet from head to toe in places i didn't know i had is more like it, this i know. keep your head up and just remember, you have accomplished so much, have come such a long way. school and the boards were not easy. always ask questions, always be willing to learn, and never fear being ignorant. i would rather be called ignorant for not knowing, than stupid for guessing and causing harm.
    Your education in nursing starts next week at the University of Hard Knocks. It will be hell for a while, Plenty of frustration and plenty of tears, but you will make out fine. As one of my favorite writers Jean Shepherd ( A Christmas Story, In God We Trust, All Others Pay Cash) use to say, "Keep your knees loose and your glove to the ground to field them grounders that life keeps hitting at you."
  13. 0
    I've been in the same situation. I was hired in long-term care with no experience on evening shift; very hectic. Drinking from a firehose is a good analogy. My strategy was very similar to others in the beginning. After organizing my resident list, marking their CBG/Insulin times, treatments, and med times; I would check on residents first. Since I have 20 residents on my halls, I check especially with the ones that I know have problems, I had heard report of problems, or who have chronic pain first.

    Next, I would take care of any PRNs and start my med pass. The hardest part of the med pass for me is dinner time. In rooms, I had bed assignments to point me to which resident was which. In the dining room, I had to rely on other nurses and the aides. It was scary and overwhelming. It has gotten better, and will for you too, slowly. I have had good staff to point me in the right direction, and I'm sure I have been a pain in the neck to them, but they have had the grace to barely let it show. We all have to have first weeks and months. Good luck!


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