LPN-RN partnership in nursing-a gentle reminder - page 3

A Gentle Reminder..... Hello RN, it's me LPN. (Not JLPN..JUST an LPN.) Don't look behind you, I'm not there. Don't look down, I'm not there either. Look beside you, that's where I am. We're on... Read More

  1. by   Paprikat
    I work in a nursing home. I do ALL the same work as the RN, except IMI's which I am learning how to do now. I came into the facility as an "experiment", the first LPN they hired, four years ago. I guess I was a success story. I was treated fairly well, except for one nurse, who was quite rude and has the attitude of "you're only here because we can't find RN's", the other's recognize me as a competent nurse and value my opinion.
    When I was in nursing school, my first placement was in acute care and there were a few RN's who refused to "deal" with LPN students. This was quite a depressing situation. But it helped me learn to not treat people like that. I value the expertise and wisdom of my care aides. They are overworked and unappreciated. We are all a part of a health care TEAM!
  2. by   ingrid
    HEY YOU ARE SO RIGHT AND THE SUBJECT IS SO SAD. HOWEVER, ALTHOUGH I HAVE WORKED AROUND THOSE TYPES OF RNS BEFORE I MUST SAY ON THE SHIFT THAT I WORK, WHICH IS EVE/NIGHT 12HRS, ALL THE RN'S APPRECIATE THE LPNS AND THEY DEFINITELY ON A DAILY BASIS ACKNOWLEDGE THAT W/O US, THEY WOULD SINK. I GUESS WE HAVE TO PRAY FOR THOSE POWER HUNGRY TYPES OF PEOPLE. I REALLY BELIEVE IT'S BECAUSE THEY HAVE NO POWER OR CONTROL IN THEIR DAY TO DAY LIVES AND THIS IN THE ONLY PLACE WHERE THEY CAN BE IN CONTROL. SAD BUT TRUE IN JUST ABOUT EVERY CASE.

    INGRID, LPN-B 6 YEARS
  3. by   Cubby
    THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR THE SENTIMENT. I AM AN RN, BUT THE LOVE OF MY LIFE IS AN LPN-AND A DAMN GOOD ONE! I WAS HAVING LUNCH ONE DAY WITH JIM AND MY BOSS CAME OVER TO THE TABLE, AND SAID (paraphrase) 'LPNS AREN'T REALLY NURSES'I WANTED TO CURL UP AND DIE. NOT ALL LPNs ARE GOOD NURSES BUT THEN AGAIN ALL RNs AREN'T EITHER. IT'S NOT THE INITALS AFTER YOUR NAME IT IS THE DECENCY IN YOUR SOUL
  4. by   rebel charm
    Hi! I'm pretty new here. Love the site. I'm a new lpn- just got my license in Sept. and I'm working in ltc. I've been really lucky. All of the RN's I work with don't have attitudes about working with lpn's. We all do the exact same job and help each other out when needed. The RN that I work the closest to is really great about showing me how to do things I don't know how to do, and she has the patience of a saint I'm really sorry to hear that this is not the norm. It should be. After all, we're all in it together, for the good of the patients.
  5. by   Agnus
    I worked as an LPN for a year before getting my RN. Now our facility no longer hires inexperienced nurses. However, they do hire LPNs. Now that should tell you something. I was hired back only because I has worked there previously as an LPN.

    I work with a number of LPN I am amaized the knowledge base they have. As a new grad LPN I didn't have this. There are some RN's with years of experience that I work with that have no clue. Give me a good LPN any day.

    You have saved our (RN) buts more than a few times.

    I am appolled to hear that some of you must have your charting co- signed!!! Give me a break. The only co-signing that goes on here is with students. With the exception of a few types of verbal orders, like DNR phone orders, nurse pronouncements, and such, then technically it must be 2 RNs but when there was only one RN and an LPN on then the LPN signed.
  6. by   Brownms46
    I have worked in a hospital where they have RN/LPN teams...and many times...it's great. But the times it has been a wonderful experience...is when the RN I'm working with...believes in working together as a team. I can work the same unit with the same set of pts. but with a different nurse, and the difference is amazing! The times when I have worked with a caring, professional nurse has made all the difference in the world. But some hospitals turn even a good thing bad. One hospital gave the RN and myself (13) pt. MED-SURG pts. with one getting 2unit PRCs. on the 3-11 shift. Thing is..I won't go back...but that nurse I'm sure did. She and others who work there FT..?? I for the life of me can't figure out why? (12) pts. as day is the norm for them. Why would anyone RN or LPN allow themselves to be abused like that everyday??

    Brownie
  7. by   nursedawn67
    I whole heartedly agree with this. Parts of this could even have the same effect with nurses and nursing assistants. Just because your the nurse doesn't mean it all has to pushed off on the nursing assistants. Everyone is part of a team, I do get tired of some thinking they are better then others. Thanks for the great post!







    Originally posted by leesonlpn
    A Gentle Reminder.....


    Hello RN, it's me LPN. (Not JLPN..JUST an LPN.) Don't look behind you, I'm not there. Don't look down, I'm not there either. Look beside you, that's where I am.
    We're on the same team. I help you, you help me, and together we get it done. Vitals need to be taken.If I'm busy, and you have time,you can take them. Putting a patient on a commode is not strictly an LPN duty, nor an RN duty - it is a nursing duty. Emptying commodes is a nursing duty. Please do not leave them in the room, hallway, or service room for me to do. Stool gatherer, urine collector, sputum catcher, yes I am, as you are. If you don't know which container, ask me, and I'll show you. There will be things I'll want to ask you too. Don't roll your eyes, or become impatient with me. No one knows everything. I have things I must get done too. My nursing duties are just as important as yours. I have things to chart, assessments to do. I have my own governing body and standards of practice, to which I hold myself accountable.. Please don't ask me to do something just because you'd rather not do it yourself. That's not what LPN's are for. Besides, it's not fair. I love nursing and I hope you do too. When LPN's and RN's work together it's a wonderful nursing partnership, and a very productive team. So come and work with me, .........
    Partner.

  8. by   Agnus
    '
    Last edit by Agnus on Mar 8, '02
  9. by   Agnus
    Employers get a real bargin hiring LPNs. Most do an RN job as competently or more than any RN. It is a small thing in comparison for me the RN to pick up the few tasks that the LPN is not allowed to do. After all I'm getting paid a LOT more.
    I went from LPN to RN with a 40% pay raise at the same hospital. There are very few things an LPN cannot do that I must do for her. It's a crime.
  10. by   Grace Oz
    You are dead right there Angus! Here in Australia, us EN's ( same as your LPN's) do ALL the hard work, the manual work, the "dirty" work, as well as the writing of casenotes, taking observations & recording them, doing wound dressings, treatments etc etc. We are THE most abused members of the nursing workforce!!...When it suits management to utilise our knowledge / skills etc, they do. But when it doesen't, they shove us back in the 'closet' & then pull us out again as it suits. No matter we've perhaps lost confidence OR the ability to perform certain tasks!!...Yep, we're real value for money, that's for sure!!...
    Cheers, Grace.
    Last edit by Grace Oz on Mar 8, '02
  11. by   live4today
    Good post leesonlpn! As an RN who has worked numerous times with some of the finest LPNs, I salute you all! You are an equal part of the whole in the healthcare team, and you deserve to be respected as such. I acknowledge and validate your feelings, and all those that other LPNs may feel in regards to how other RNs may or may not treat them in the workplace. Teamwork is where it's at. We can't change the legal ramifications of why LPNs and RNs are designated certain tasks, but we can change our approach in how we manage working side by side with one another, helping one another as much as possible for the well-being of our patient population. That's what matters! Do what we can legally do, and what we can't legally do, we pull together and get done according to the laws as they are delegated for our particular nursing scope of practice. Fighting about it doesn't change what is, but we can send in letters to the "heads that be" in regards to all the "political jargon and red tape" that is such a legal hassle often creating havoc and chaos where peace and harmony need to reign foremost in our efforts to treat the sick.

    Once we nurses show the public that we can stand together as nurses, and not just "various titles in nursing", then we will have made what I call "major progress" in getting the "heads that be" and the "public" to listen up to what we have to say that needs changing in our career field. After we accomplish our efforts to show a strong united front, then, and only then, can we begin to sit down and coexist as we begin the process of recognition between us, according to the various titles and certifications held. Just my humble little opinion!
  12. by   leesonlpn
    Thank you renee and others for your most encouraging comments. Now I have a bigger hurdle. I was asked to be a member of our hospital's new Nursing Practice Council. Guess what. 15 RN's, and Me, one LPN. A little unbalanced don't you think. I wrote a letter to our CNO stating she has a duty to be unbiased and give equal representation to LPN's. Her response was that as an RN her self, she must be reminded to think otherwise.etc. etc. In a skills mix group I was involved with, her thoughts were if it was up to her there would only be care aides in acute care, no LPN's. Coming from our CNO. Anyway I screamed and hollered and was able to get permission (ahem) to recruit two more LPN's ......and so it goes...................................
  13. by   live4today
    Good for you, leesonlpn, for standing up to your CNO in that respect! There certainly should be more than one LPN on that council! How dare she think any differently! I would have gone for a couple CNAs on that council as well. Why not round it out to include all three healthcare providers since all three have a lot of direct contact with the patients? That's just my own humble opinion, but if I ran that council, I would have at least two CNAs, three LPNs, and the rest RNs. RNs need to hear their staffs viewpoints concerning patient care to make the units run more smoothly, and to gain input from sources that may have different perspectives than they would on things concerning patient care. Afterall, isn't the object of forming a council like that to gain a broader perspective of things in order to make necessary changes where they are needed on the nursing units?

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    "We can't change the past, but we can gather up its lessons and move on, stronger and wiser."--UNKNOWN

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