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Marijke

Marijke

Obstetrics, perioperative, Infection Con
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Marijke has 25 years experience and specializes in Obstetrics, perioperative, Infection Con.

After graduating in The Netherlands I came to Canada in 1992, where I have been working as an RN ever since. After working in obstetrical and perioperative nursing, I became a clinical coordinator in the purchasing department of my health authority. Almost 4 years ago, I took on the role of regional manager Infection Prevention and Control.

Marijke's Latest Activity

  1. Marijke

    Nursing in Canada HELP!!!

    Hi there, No you do not have to work fulltime in order to work in Canada. Depending on your speciality there are different possibilities. If you are for example an ICU, Obstetrical or OR nurse, you might be able to get a parttime job right away. However a lot of us started as a casual (fill in shifts where needed), which might be good for you, with a child. You take the shifts you can and if your child is ill or there are childcare issues, you are able to cancel. I don't know if there are any daycare facilities in the hospitals in Alberta, but I would doubt it. Just to let you know there is an all Canadian forum on this site, so for further questions, or to meet somebody from the area you are going to, you might want to check it out. By the way where are you from? Good luck! Marijke :balloons:
  2. In my new job as surgical products coordinator I have come across the problem of converting French sizing to metric and the same for Gauge. Does anybody have a conversion list? Marijke :)
  3. Marijke

    Family visitation in ICU

    I have been reading all the postings, since my last one a while ago. Ther are some very good ones, mainly from people who have seen both sides of the story. Yes family members can be a royal pain in the behind, yes there should be a way to restrict visitors who are disruptive. However decissions should be made on a case to case basis. One posting stated family members are not in need of nursing care and should not interfere. However, family members are very much in need of nursing care and compassion. Any nurse who doesn't get this should not be at the patients bedside. Critical and palliative care is more than just taking care of the ailing patient, family and friends are just as important. Marijke
  4. Marijke

    Family visitation in ICU

    I have been reading all the postings, since my last one a while ago. Ther are some very good ones, mainly from people who have seen both sides of the story. Yes family members can be a royal pain in the behind, yes there should be a way to restrict visitors who are disruptive. However decissions should be made on a case to case basis. One posting stated family members are not in need of nursing care and should not interfere. However, family members are very much in need of nursing care and compassion. Any nurse who doesn't get this should not be at the patients bedside. Critical and palliative care is more than just taking care of the ailing patient, family and friends are just as important. Marijke
  5. Marijke

    Family visitation in ICU

    Sorry for the strong language, but has any of you ever had a family member in ICU? It is an incredible hard thing to deal with. My father died in ICU in The Netherlands last May, the hardest thing I have ever had to deal with. The unit was locked, but we where welcome at any time just by calling in (even when he was considered stable). I know the family can be a pain in the behind in the ICU, ever thought some of them are because they are beyond coping? Being a nurse I could hardly handle it, but with the help and compassion (ever heard of compassion?) of the nursing staff we managed to keep things together and make the correct decission. Sorry but this thread has me just fuming!!!! :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire Marijke
  6. Marijke

    Family visitation in ICU

    Sorry for the strong language, but has any of you ever had a family member in ICU? It is an incredible hard thing to deal with. My father died in ICU in The Netherlands last May, the hardest thing I have ever had to deal with. The unit was locked, but we where welcome at any time just by calling in (even when he was considered stable). I know the family can be a pain in the behind in the ICU, ever thought some of them are because they are beyond coping? Being a nurse I could hardly handle it, but with the help and compassion (ever heard of compassion?) of the nursing staff we managed to keep things together and make the correct decission. Sorry but this thread has me just fuming!!!! :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire Marijke
  7. OK I will see what can be done. I have no idea if it is possible. The good thing is, you are trying during a period where our own students are on holidays. Marijke;)
  8. Marijke

    O.K. I seriously think I'm burning out...

    I think the sad part is that most of us know what it feels like to be working under those kind of circumstances. Marijke
  9. Hi Gordon, What area are you interested in? I have no idea if my hospital does these kind of things, but I could ask next week. I work in Kelowna BC, a nice town to spend your summer and not to far from Vancouver. Marijke:cool:
  10. Marijke

    Would OR nursing be a good fit for me?

    I am not known as the most patient person either, but seem to be doing fairly well. Nursing has actually improved things a lot. Don't worry to much about the communication thing, there are countless hours spend in nursing school on these things and it does get easier (practice makes perfect) Give nursing a try, God knows we need all the help we can get. I love the OR, after working OB, this is heaven. Good luck! Marijke:nurse:
  11. Marijke

    new ward nurse starting out

    How about using a PDA? I know you are just starting out , but there are some really good deals to be found. You can carry an incredible amount of info with you, in a relative small thing. It can hold all the phone numbers you could possibly need. You can make quick notes on things you need to chart. You can set alarms for things you need to remember. It can hold your schedule. You can download all kind of little programs that could serve as reference materials including ePocrates, a very good, free! drug reference program. Even if you don't have your own PC, I think you still might find it useful (minus the little programs). Good luck with your new job!!!! Marijke:D
  12. Marijke

    A little pet peeve

    How about idear instead of idea. Marijke
  13. Marijke

    Gowning and Gloving

    Yes it takes a while to get the hang of it. I give new people their own gown table so they can take their time to do it and not feel pressured. Try to practice at home (most warm up jackets have knitted cuffs like OR gowns, so you can use those), it is much easier when nobody is watching. Relax you can do it!!!!!! Marijke:D
  14. Marijke

    Gordon Campbell DUI

    A lot of us would loose our job because of a conviction. He was driving almost twice over the legal limit. Something tells me he had a lot more than the 7 drinks he stated he had during this long evening. Did you see his wifes face? I think he is facing the biggest challenge at home.:chuckle Marijke
  15. Marijke

    Moving to Canada from USA

    Hi Fergus, Just read your posting, are you really thinking about going to the Grace (BCWH), I would advise caution. I worked there for apr. 5 years, low risk and high risk LDR. The day I left was the best day of my life so far. Management is only interested in special little glamour projects, leaving no money for the great volume of regular patients and out of town patients. Of the highly qualified staff that was working there when I left in 1999, is hardly any left, making it a very scary place to work (and to be a patient). I think you are much better of staying in the Okanagan, although I realize morale is at a very low point, the lower mainland is much worse of. At least here you can still communicate with your patients, which is a very hard thing in Vancouver, if you don't speak Cantonese, Mandarin or Punjabi. It is not that I have a problem with that, but it does get exhausting after a while, specially if you want to provide the best care possible and have a hard time communicating with the patient in labour and her family. Good luck with your search for a nice place to work. Marijke:chair:
  16. Marijke

    British RN taking Canadian RN exam

    Hi Gail, Don't sweat the exam to much, nothing like the European or US exams. As long as you are able to read and answer multiple choice questions, you will pass with flying colors (don't even have to be a nurse). I wrote the RN's 12 years ago, when my English was Dutch high school quality. After 2 days and 400 multiple choice questions, I was starting to question if this was the real exam. It is however good to do a couple of practice exams, so you know what to expect (lots of psych). Those books where not available 12 years ago and I had no idea what expect, so I studied for the American NCLEX, total waste of my time, but a good refresher course. Good luck and I hope you will like Canada. I read a lot of complaints about wages in Canada, but you probably know what it is like earning a lot less. Marijke